Framing

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Fernando A, Oct 12, 2003.

  1. Fernando A

    Fernando A Auditioning

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    First timer.

    I'm just about to start framing my basement. I'm doing an open concept HT/billiard/bar room. My local HT specialists mentioned that instead of building a REAL sub floor I could screw down 5/8 plywood directly over the concrete and this would improve the sound quality of my set up. Has anyone ever heard of this being recommended?:b

    Also, Build a screen vs. buy one. I would rather spend the 600 - 1000 dollars on speakers then on a screen. Can I really build a screen that performs as well as a purchased screen?
     
  2. Dave Milne

    Dave Milne Supporting Actor

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  3. Fernando A

    Fernando A Auditioning

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    The plywood idea sounded funny to me too.

    Also, I have been reading through this forum like mad and I have not come across any comments on metal studs vs. wood studs. Metal is cheaper but if it offers poorer results I wouldn't want to go that route.

    There are some truely amazing HT's found on this forum.[​IMG]
     
  4. Mark McGill

    Mark McGill Stunt Coordinator

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    If you have a dry basement (check by taping a piece of clear plastic onto the cement, if no moisture great) then you can put carpet on the cement, however I would consider a rubber underlay to combat any slight moisture problems. If the floor is damp then you will need to seal it and put down a sub floor. Good luck.
     
  5. John Swarce

    John Swarce Second Unit

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    Has anyone used a product called DriLoc, available at Home Depot? I believe this is a "floating" floor that is not nailed to the concrete.
     
  6. Brent Card

    Brent Card Auditioning

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    I believe it is called DriCor, and I am installing it next weekend.

    Looks like a great product, and for my 600 sq. ft. basement, it only costs about 200 bucks more than if I did a standard sub-floor with wood.

    I love the idea that it levels the surface around drains, but should something happen and I get water, it will still easily run out via the drains and not make a huge mess as it would if I had a wood sub-floor.
     
  7. Fernando A

    Fernando A Auditioning

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    My basement is bone dry. I guess I'll simply go with a high quality uderpad and carpet. This will save me some cash. Still would like to hear input on wood vs. metal studs. Thanks. [​IMG]
     
  8. pradike

    pradike Stunt Coordinator

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    Smart move. I have the same setup...went with a premium pad and carpet...no echos, no harmonics, no reverb, just great sound. Save your cash for something more important in your theater...that is, something that will make a difference...

    That plywood floor stuff is useless.
     
  9. Mark McGill

    Mark McGill Stunt Coordinator

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    Unless you are used to working with metal studs I would recommend wood. Metal is straight etc but there is a learning curve. The downside to metal is for all of your trim etc that needs to be nailed on, you must place wood in the metal studs for nailing into. So in other words go with traditional wood framing. Remember to use pressure treated for anything that comes in contact with the cement floor. Many municipalities have codes requiring this. Also keep a dead air space between all cement foundations. If you need more explanation on this let me know.
     
  10. Dave Milne

    Dave Milne Supporting Actor

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    Ditto what Mark said on metal studs. If you're used to working with metal, it's great. If not, it's a nightmare.

    However, if you're planning complex curves, metal studs can be easier. It's amazing what you can do with metal studs and a pair of tin snips. I recently visited an utterly spectacular theater installation in a home under construction. It was about 20'x35' mostly oval-shaped with some graceful curves in the walls and a domed ceiling! Try doing that with wood studs [​IMG]
     
  11. Fernando A

    Fernando A Auditioning

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    Thank you all. I have made up my mind. I will frame all walls in wood, use reilient channel for the ceilings, and use metal studs for the coffered ceilings.[​IMG]
     
  12. Mark McGill

    Mark McGill Stunt Coordinator

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    Whatever you do just remember that if you are planning on attaching any sort of trim, back your steel with wood. You'll notice that 2x4's slip into steel studs. They were designed for that. Good luck
     
  13. Cary_H

    Cary_H Second Unit

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    I have some pretty fair experience framing with metal studs and track.
    The last time I did any framing was helping out a family member. I couldn't sway him from using wood, and it took three of us triple the time I would have required....going it solo. What should/could have been a quick little project became a huge pain. Never again!
    Using metal demands far less precision when measuring for cuts, it's a breeze to cut even without a metal stud cutter, and way easier to secure. Less mess, less noise, less fuss.
    As a previous poster already implied.....just scab pieces of 2x4 where you'll need backing for trim, or add/substitute wood studs where you need additional strength.
    Armed with little more than the basic how-tos and the right tools you'll put yourself through far less pain using metal. Wood framing demands a far higher level of skill than the average, everyday guy has in his repertoir if carpentry isn't one of his hobbies.
     
  14. Fernando A

    Fernando A Auditioning

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    Good point. I suppose I could build the bar and the stage out of wood for the strength factor and go with metal for everyhing non-load bearing.[​IMG]
     
  15. Robert-Y

    Robert-Y Auditioning

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    Just a typo correction for Brent Card's post on the subfloor system that floors over concrete. It's called "DRIcore." It is carried in some Home Depot locations. Go to the DRIcore website for the specific stores.
     

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