FOX 2.35:1 Trailer of 1.85:1 Films

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chris Stone, Oct 23, 2001.

  1. Chris Stone

    Chris Stone Agent

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    anyone know what is up with those 2.35:1 Trailer of Films that were shot flat in 1.85:1, for example
    The Scout
    Airheads
    Unlawful Entry
    Buffy, the Vampire Slayer
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  2. Adam Tyner

    Adam Tyner Screenwriter

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    I'm probably wrong, and I'm sure someone will correct me...but don't a pretty hefty portion of trailers have flat and scope equivalents? I should probably be embarassed to admit this, but I have two Josie and the Pussycats 35mm trailers, one flat and the other scope. The scope trailer looks like it's been reformatted in some way -- there are no 'black bars' or anything I can spot, though I admittedly haven't given it more than a cursory look...
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  3. Sean Cauley

    Sean Cauley Stunt Coordinator

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    As far as I can understand it, the reason for the scope and flat formats of theatrical trailers is so that they can run on a screen matted either way for the main feature in a theatrical setting. That way, if you're sitting in the audience for a flat-ratio romantic comedy, they can show you a trailer for a STAR WARS film that's formatted to fit the 1.85:1 screen (if I recall correctly, the widescreen VHS releases of the STAR WARS special edition trilogy included SE trailers in 1.85:1, and the VHS).
    I guess the DVD's in question must have gone with the trailer that doesn't match the finished film's ratio for some reason or other (quality of film elements? easiest to find?).
     
  4. Rusty Ray

    Rusty Ray Second Unit

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    yeah, they have to "flip a lens" to go from 1:85:1, to 2:35:1, and vice versa.. they prolly just crop and matte the trailers so they dont have to go through the hassle of switching over if the movie itself is not in the same aspect ratio.. sometimes they forget... [​IMG]
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  5. frank manrique

    frank manrique Supporting Actor

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    It is customary for movie studios to order trailers of all their movies in both "flat" (spherical 1:85:1) and "scope" (anomorphic 2:35:1) formats, whether they were shot flat or in scope anomorphic.
    This greatly simplifies film projection matters; for instance, if an scope ratioed film is being exhibited and trailers of non-scope movies are to be shown prior to the main feature, then there will be no need for extraneous work such as lens flipping, as it was suggested.
    Btw, there was a time when all movie trailers had mono soundtracks. Then a few years ago it became customary to have them both with mono and stereo tracks, but now most movie trailers even have Dolby Digital and Sony SDDS (if it still survives), plus the DTS sync time code (whose signal is "read" by a laser "reader" off theatrical prints, then sent to the CD-ROM unit where discs containing the soundtracks are played back)...in addition to Dolby "SR" optical stereo (analog sound) tracks...
    -THTS
     
  6. GerardoHP

    GerardoHP Supporting Actor

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  7. Jesse Skeen

    Jesse Skeen Producer

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    I'm guessing that for these trailers, they included the scope versions because these had stereo soundtracks; the flat versions were mono. For some odd reason, for a while Fox and Disney/Buena Vista were doing all their flat trailers in mono, but the scope trailers were in stereo. Later, to my dismay, their scope trailers also started showing up in mono and stayed that way until the studios came to their senses and started doing all their trailers in Dolby Digital and analog stereo (most current trailers also have SDDS, and timecoded for DTS assuming the trailer disc has the soundtrack on it and assuming the theater bothers to get the trailer discs and put them in!)
     
  8. Lyle_JP

    Lyle_JP Screenwriter

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    "Flipping a lens" is harder than you think, unless your projector is a Cinemechanica or one of the newer Simplex machines. Most movie projectors (Century, Norelco, older Simplex) don't have lens turrets, and switching a lens requires loosening (unscrewing) the pin that holds the lens in place, pulling the lens out of the projector, sliding the new lens in to place, making sure it is oriented properly (if anamorphic), tightening the pin down, and then changing the aperture plate in the gate.
    As you can imagine, the above procedure is pretty time consuming, and you try not to keep an audience in the dark for that long, so the alternative is to have all your trailers in the same format as your feature. The studios help you with this by releasing trailers for just about every movie in both flat and scope.
    Of course, in older theaters (and maybe a handful of new ones) you also have the alternative of running the trailer reel on a separate projector from the feature. This makes swapping out trailers week by week much easier, but very few theaters still have two projectors aimed at the same screen anymore.
    -Lyle J.P.
     
  9. Derek Miner

    Derek Miner Screenwriter

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    There's also a trailer like this on That Thing You Do. I remember seeing this in the theater in scope as well, and hoping the film was going to be scope.
    = Derek =
     
  10. Jesse Skeen

    Jesse Skeen Producer

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    That's odd, since by the time "That Thing You Do" came out, all trailers were in stereo and digital in both flat and scope formats. There was only a difference in the pre-digital days when the analog tracks on the scope versions would be stereo but the flat versions were mono.
     

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