John Dirk

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But again, I personally can’t see this as being all bad when I can press a button on my remote and watch nearly any movie that’s in print. I don’t want to go back to the days of having to go to a specialty store to find something outside of the top hundred titles and then have something special ordered and delivered a month later. In the 1980s, it was a week or months long project if someone said “You should see...”. Now, it’s a button push. On the whole, this is a tremendous benefit.
@Josh Steinberg - As always, well stated and articulated. The only problems I have with the new paradigm are:

  1. You can't truly own it unless you have a shiny disc in your hands.
  2. Studios have already shown their willingness to alter original classics to suit "the times."
Both concern me but the latter is an abomination I will avoid as long as I can. That said, I agree physical media will become less and less relevant to the general consumer and eventually reach niche status similar to where vinyl exists today.
 

John Dirk

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think the next evolution is right around the corner.

That evolution is 5G

Now, if I understand it correctly -- and I always welcome facts -- it is faster than the fastest wired cable speed available.
@Ronald Epstein - I haven't thoroughly researched 5G yet [so no actual facts] but I will. Generally speaking, however, ALL wireless connections ultimately uplink to a wired connection at the ISP level. If the infrastructure there is sufficient and you've purchased a high enough tier then, yes, there should be no bandwidth issues.

Also, like all new tech, it will likely be a long time before 5G rolls out to rural areas. Verizon lists it as available in ATL today yet I still cannot get it where I live which is only about 18 miles outside the metro area.
 

Josh Steinberg

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@Josh Steinberg - As always, well stated and articulated. The only problems I have with the new paradigm are:

  1. You can't truly own it unless you have a shiny disc in your hands.
  2. Studios have already shown their willingness to alter original classics to suit "the times."
Both concern me but the latter is an abomination I will avoid as long as I can. That said, I agree physical media will become less and less relevant to the general consumer and eventually reach niche status similar to where vinyl exists today.
To point 1, this isn’t something the average consumer cares about at all. They want access, but don’t care about permanently acquiring anything. To varying degrees, they may even feel burned by their past purchase choices. Your average consumer might remember spending money on VHS tapes they can no longer play, or may remember spending money on a DVD they didn’t watch as much as they thought they would, or in general is getting the picture that every few years they’re being asked to buy the same thing again. It’s just not a merry-go-round they want to be on. And statistically speaking, your average consumer already has at least one streaming subscription. So from their point of view, it’s not even about trading in discs for streaming, it’s about that they’re already paying for a service that gives them want they want, so why keep buying discs?

...which, incidentally, don’t always last forever.

To your closing point of it one day being a niche like vinyl, it’s already so close. Many of the vinyl pressings out there are getting hundreds of copies, and if they sell 500 of them, that’s a win in a lot of cases. The Kino Insider said in another thread that they need to sell 1500 copies of something for it to work out. That’s certainly closer numbers-wise to what vinyl does now than it is to what disc sales did ten years ago.
 
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Josh Steinberg

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It could end up being a win for us - the quality of vinyl has gone up now that the people doing those releases only have to satisfy a small group of enthusiasts looking for a premium quality product, rather than having to straddle the like between appeasing collectors while appealing to a mass market.
 

Todd Erwin

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I think the next evolution is right around the corner.

That evolution is 5G

Now, if I understand it correctly -- and I always welcome facts -- it is faster than the fastest wired cable speed available.

I am *assuming* 5G has the ability to replace home internet as we now know it.

The only thing I am not certain is if, with all those cell towers, 5G has the ability to deliver those phenomenal speeds without any cable connections and without congestion. If that can be done then 4k and 8k streaming should be a piece of cake.
I say kudos to T-Mobile for their rural rollout of 5G (my little rural community was part of their initial rollout), and boo to Verizon, whose slogan of "5G Built Right" is quite the opposite, rolling out in larger metro areas first.
 
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Josh Steinberg

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I say kudos to T-Mobile for their rural rollout of 5G (my little rural community was part of their initial rollout), and boo to Verizon, whose slogan of "5G Built Right" is quite the opposite, rolling out in larger metro areas first.
T-Mobile’s plan seems to make more business sense too. You’d think you’d have an easier time bringing a new product to a long underserved area that desperately needed it, than you would bringing a redundant product to an area with people who already have multiple options.
 
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