John Dirk

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But again, I personally can’t see this as being all bad when I can press a button on my remote and watch nearly any movie that’s in print. I don’t want to go back to the days of having to go to a specialty store to find something outside of the top hundred titles and then have something special ordered and delivered a month later. In the 1980s, it was a week or months long project if someone said “You should see...”. Now, it’s a button push. On the whole, this is a tremendous benefit.
@Josh Steinberg - As always, well stated and articulated. The only problems I have with the new paradigm are:

  1. You can't truly own it unless you have a shiny disc in your hands.
  2. Studios have already shown their willingness to alter original classics to suit "the times."
Both concern me but the latter is an abomination I will avoid as long as I can. That said, I agree physical media will become less and less relevant to the general consumer and eventually reach niche status similar to where vinyl exists today.
 

John Dirk

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think the next evolution is right around the corner.

That evolution is 5G

Now, if I understand it correctly -- and I always welcome facts -- it is faster than the fastest wired cable speed available.
@Ronald Epstein - I haven't thoroughly researched 5G yet [so no actual facts] but I will. Generally speaking, however, ALL wireless connections ultimately uplink to a wired connection at the ISP level. If the infrastructure there is sufficient and you've purchased a high enough tier then, yes, there should be no bandwidth issues.

Also, like all new tech, it will likely be a long time before 5G rolls out to rural areas. Verizon lists it as available in ATL today yet I still cannot get it where I live which is only about 18 miles outside the metro area.
 

Josh Steinberg

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@Josh Steinberg - As always, well stated and articulated. The only problems I have with the new paradigm are:

  1. You can't truly own it unless you have a shiny disc in your hands.
  2. Studios have already shown their willingness to alter original classics to suit "the times."
Both concern me but the latter is an abomination I will avoid as long as I can. That said, I agree physical media will become less and less relevant to the general consumer and eventually reach niche status similar to where vinyl exists today.
To point 1, this isn’t something the average consumer cares about at all. They want access, but don’t care about permanently acquiring anything. To varying degrees, they may even feel burned by their past purchase choices. Your average consumer might remember spending money on VHS tapes they can no longer play, or may remember spending money on a DVD they didn’t watch as much as they thought they would, or in general is getting the picture that every few years they’re being asked to buy the same thing again. It’s just not a merry-go-round they want to be on. And statistically speaking, your average consumer already has at least one streaming subscription. So from their point of view, it’s not even about trading in discs for streaming, it’s about that they’re already paying for a service that gives them want they want, so why keep buying discs?

...which, incidentally, don’t always last forever.

To your closing point of it one day being a niche like vinyl, it’s already so close. Many of the vinyl pressings out there are getting hundreds of copies, and if they sell 500 of them, that’s a win in a lot of cases. The Kino Insider said in another thread that they need to sell 1500 copies of something for it to work out. That’s certainly closer numbers-wise to what vinyl does now than it is to what disc sales did ten years ago.
 

Josh Steinberg

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It could end up being a win for us - the quality of vinyl has gone up now that the people doing those releases only have to satisfy a small group of enthusiasts looking for a premium quality product, rather than having to straddle the like between appeasing collectors while appealing to a mass market.
 

Todd Erwin

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I think the next evolution is right around the corner.

That evolution is 5G

Now, if I understand it correctly -- and I always welcome facts -- it is faster than the fastest wired cable speed available.

I am *assuming* 5G has the ability to replace home internet as we now know it.

The only thing I am not certain is if, with all those cell towers, 5G has the ability to deliver those phenomenal speeds without any cable connections and without congestion. If that can be done then 4k and 8k streaming should be a piece of cake.
I say kudos to T-Mobile for their rural rollout of 5G (my little rural community was part of their initial rollout), and boo to Verizon, whose slogan of "5G Built Right" is quite the opposite, rolling out in larger metro areas first.
 
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Josh Steinberg

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I say kudos to T-Mobile for their rural rollout of 5G (my little rural community was part of their initial rollout), and boo to Verizon, whose slogan of "5G Built Right" is quite the opposite, rolling out in larger metro areas first.
T-Mobile’s plan seems to make more business sense too. You’d think you’d have an easier time bringing a new product to a long underserved area that desperately needed it, than you would bringing a redundant product to an area with people who already have multiple options.
 
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Blu Eye

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If anyone needed another reason to keep buying physical media:

Pretty obvious really in relation to streaming.

However, I am a little surprised about the downloaded film purchase.

I don't know how they can control that, however.

I have not streamed or downloaded a film so I don't know the actual process but I am assuming once you have downloaded it you can save it to a flash drive and play it on your video player etc.

If Amazon subsequently inform you that the film can no longer be watched then you still have the option to do so without them knowing.

Personally, this would be something I would not have any reservations about especially as I have already paid for it.

However, as it states in the terms and conditions you don't own it and you are technically agreeing to their terms.

I think I have commented on this before but it's worth repeating that all these streaming companies apart from maybe Disney + do not own the rights to the films and only have temporary agreements with the companies that do own them to stream etc.
 
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Malcolm R

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That's been the main argument against digital/streaming for years. Access to your purchased content is not guaranteed in perpetuity.

Digital/streaming makes it much easier for the studios to control their content. Their holy grail would be to get consumers to pay a fee for each and every viewing of a film or show. Wall-to-wall pay-per-view for everything.

Online rentals are just the short-term version of where we may be headed. Currently, you have X number of days to watch your rental then you lose access. I can see a day when you would not buy a film, but instead may "buy" access to a film for a period (say one year). But then if you want to renew your access to watch it again after that year has passed, you'd have to pay again.
 

Worth

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That's been the main argument against digital/streaming for years. Access to your purchased content is not guaranteed in perpetuity.

Digital/streaming makes it much easier for the studios to control their content. Their holy grail would be to get consumers to pay a fee for each and every viewing of a film or show. Wall-to-wall pay-per-view for everything.

Online rentals are just the short-term version of where we may be headed. Currently, you have X number of days to watch your rental then you lose access. I can see a day when you would not buy a film, but instead may "buy" access to a film for a period (say one year). But then if you want to renew your access to watch it again after that year has passed, you'd have to pay again.
That seemed to be the way things were going for a while, but subscription services have become the dominant model in the last few years. The vast majority of viewers watch something only once and don't feel the need to own anything. They seem perfectly content with services like Netflix and Disney+ which offer a fairly wide variety of content for a monthly fee, instead of paying per title.
 

jcroy

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That seemed to be the way things were going for a while, but subscription services have become the dominant model in the last few years. The vast majority of viewers watch something only once and don't feel the need to own anything. They seem perfectly content with services like Netflix and Disney+ which offer a fairly wide variety of content for a monthly fee, instead of paying per title.
Even if joe sixpack or jane q public have a movie/show on vhs, dvd (or bluray), it ends up sitting on the shelf collecting dust for years (or decades) without ever being watched once.
 
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Mark-P

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I have not streamed or downloaded a film so I don't know the actual process but I am assuming once you have downloaded it you can save it to a flash drive and play it on your video player etc.

If Amazon subsequently inform you that the film can no longer be watched then you still have the option to do so without them knowing.
Your assumption is false. Any downloaded video content is encrypted with DRM so that it can only be played back via the app or service of the provider. Furthermore, while Amazon video content can be downloaded to devices such as smartphones and tablets, they disabled the ability to download to PCs years ago.
 

Blu Eye

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That's been the main argument against digital/streaming for years. Access to your purchased content is not guaranteed in perpetuity.

Digital/streaming makes it much easier for the studios to control their content. Their holy grail would be to get consumers to pay a fee for each and every viewing of a film or show. Wall-to-wall pay-per-view for everything.

Online rentals are just the short-term version of where we may be headed. Currently, you have X number of days to watch your rental then you lose access. I can see a day when you would not buy a film, but instead may "buy" access to a film for a period (say one year). But then if you want to renew your access to watch it again after that year has passed, you'd have to pay again.
Exactly!

I have said something similar myself.

Personally, I think we are entering into a dark age in relation to movies (I hope I am wrong).

Going by how younger generations movie watching habits are such as watching movies on their phones and streaming I think cinemas will be severly reduced in numbers in the western world.

Taking into consideration the current economic climate and the closures of them at the moment I think their decline has been exacerbated and sped up which will make 2021 an interesting year.

As far as I can tell bums on seats have been declining year on year for a while. There has been a lot of noise about the movie "Tenet" being pushed as a last great attempt to revive what has been a cinema loving culture in the western world in the last 50 years plus.

I don't expect younger audiences to appreciate and watch older films made in the last century. Only the latest release on their phones or streamed at home. This is bound to change not only how artistically movies are made but also their budgets etc.

The studios will still probably be the major players. I expect them all to have their own streaming services eventually and I think I have mentioned this in my previous posts. The way I see it the major avenue of how new movies will be viewed and where their profits will be realized will be via streaming as opposed to cinemas so whoever owns the streaming businesses will have a lot of power and influence.

There may be a few streaming companies that become independent but I would still expect them to be heavily influenced by the major studios if any shall exist. If it has not yet happened, I fully believe Netflix will be bought by a major studio at some point. The reason I believe that will occurr is because Netflix are making their own movies and so they are a major threat to the big studios.

It could be that Amazon and Netflix become major studios themselves and challenge the old guard.

Lastly, I think it is highly likely that TV shows is where the majority of funding is going to flow. There seems to be a plethora of them around at the moment. Can't keep up with the amount of content and a lot of it is of a high quality too. You could even argue that they are more interesting than most of the movies being made currently. Going by the amount of content being made available I am assuming most of them make good profits. If so, this probably is helped by the lower budgets required to make them and the ones that reach big audiences seem to do better than most blockbuster movies.
 

Blu Eye

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Your assumption is false. Any downloaded video content is encrypted with DRM so that it can only be played back via the app or service of the provider. Furthermore, while Amazon video content can be downloaded to devices such as smartphones and tablets, they disabled the ability to download to PCs years ago.
Oh okay.

This makes me scratch my head even more as to why people pay for these limited services.

I must say that does not surprise me one bit.

It's certainly not a service that interests me and I am glad I have collected and continue to collect physical media.

I don't think that is ever going to change, either.
 
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OLDTIMER

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The vast majority of my own viewing is from my own extensive collection of DVDs and Blu-rays, although I still occasionally watch streaming or off-air. The reasons for this choice have extensively been covered in this thread.

My gripe is that most of my friends and relatives cannot understand this. “Why would you want to watch the same movie twice?” is the usual comment. So I no longer tell them about my viewing habits or what being a film buff is. I just sit back with my wife and enjoy our nightly film shows.
 

John Dirk

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Oh okay.

This makes me scratch my head even more as to why people pay for these limited services.

I must say that does not surprise me one bit.

It's certainly not a service that interests me and I am glad I have collected and continue to collect physical media.

I don't think that is ever going to change, either.
These services, like most, are designed for the masses. What matters most to them is convenience. Most probably have no idea what DRM means, let alone what it can do. This is yet another area where enthusiasts will likely take it on the chin while the masses are blissfully unaffected.
 

BobO'Link

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Your assumption is false. Any downloaded video content is encrypted with DRM so that it can only be played back via the app or service of the provider. Furthermore, while Amazon video content can be downloaded to devices such as smartphones and tablets, they disabled the ability to download to PCs years ago.
Amazon now has a Prime Video app for Windows which now allows videos to be "downloaded." It must be installed from the MS store (blech) and I'd expect it to suffer from the same limited playback capabilities as with the other devices on which downloading is supported.
 

Worth

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...As far as I can tell bums on seats have been declining year on year for a while. There has been a lot of noise about the movie "Tenet" being pushed as a last great attempt to revive what has been a cinema loving culture in the western world in the last 50 years plus...
Not really. Except this year, of course, attendance has been remarkably consistent year over year. Whether the pandemic will permanently alter moviegoing behaviour remains to be seen.
 

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