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For Those Who Still Think Physical Media Has No Place in the 21st century...

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by Nick*Z, Nov 16, 2019.

  1. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    And those of us who like other genres find it irritating that the stuff we like gets pushed aside for that.

    Why else would law-abiding consumers be treated as if we were potential criminals? Why else would we be subjected to all this rigamarole when none of it is actually necessary for a disc to function inside a player?
     
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  2. Blu Eye

    Blu Eye Stunt Coordinator

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    Most likely. I see a lot of titles especially horror that I have never heard of and most of them no doubt ever played in cinemas.

    I wonder if the companies are making money putting these type of titles out but they must be as there is a plethora of films coming out where I scratch my head.

    They would not be releasing these titles if there was no demand.

    It is both fascinating and frustrating at the same time looking at the releases.
     
  3. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

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    I'll give you credit here for "reading my mind". :)

    Back when I was in the peak of my ocd compulsive completionist collecting of dvds/blurays, this ^^ was exactly one of several arguments I would keep on saying to myself repeatedly, largely to rationalize all the buying binges I was doing in those days.
     
  4. Blu Eye

    Blu Eye Stunt Coordinator

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    I hope you are right but I'm afraid I am very cynical by nature.
    Knowing how businesses will exploit any situation for maximum profit given the opportunity I am concerned about the monopoly over the content they have.

    Also, what would be the consequences if Internet Service Providers started charging via the amount of data you use?

    The mobile phone companies still do it.
    The ISPs did that in the beginning here in the UK.
    I know it is not utilised now but it is still possible in the future.
    Internet is not a human right. Only a privilege. I have always wondered why it is so cheap.

    Maybe the companies make huge profits at these prices but not sure.

    I do realise streaming could be a potential paradise but I am still very sceptical.
     
  5. Message #345 of 647 Jan 24, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2020
    MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    I detest "background noise" and I only leave the TV on when I actually want to watch it. Otherwise, it's a waste of time and a waste of electricity, and therefore a waste of money. In my opinion, the only shows that are worth watching at all are shows that are worth giving your undivided attention to. If I want something to listen to while I am doing something, I'll listen to music. The lack of a visual component to the audio makes it easier to concentrate on two things at once.

    I'm starting to agree with Nick*Z's points about DVD's time essentially being over. It was good while it lasted, but binge-watching LA Law reminded me how bad the worst DVDs can be, and also why it was two years into the format's existence before I adopted it. It is at the same age now that laserdisc was when it gave up the ghost. For all its flaws, the best laserdisc has to offer is still better than the worst DVD has to offer. But all the things DVD can do that laserdisc can't, Blu-ray and UHD can also do and do better. If technology has reached the point where content shot on tape can look be made to better, or at least have its technical flaws made significantly less distracting, on Blu-ray than it did on DVD, then I'm not exactly sure what we're keeping DVD around for anymore other than the minority of films whose Blu-ray successors aren't improvements. That's not the format's fault, that's the studios' fault.
     
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  6. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

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    To get around this issue, I only use the cable provider's data pipes to my cable box dvr when watching anything on vod (whether a lot carte or flat-rate). As far as I can figure out, the cable connection to the dvr box is not metered at all. (ie. My cable bill is exactly the same every month, even when the dvr box is recording hd stuff 24 hours a day from various baisc cable channels).

    I don't use my actual internet connection to watch any streaming services.
     
  7. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

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    I guess you're very very different than me. :)

    I thrive in a noisy environment.

    Whenever I'm in non-noisy environments, I get anxious and paranoid very easily.
     
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  8. Worth

    Worth Producer

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    If Netflix or any other streaming service jacked up its prices, people would simply cancel their subscriptions. The younger generations don't seem particularly interested in film and television anyway - they'd just spend more time on social media and video games.

    And on top of that, there's also piracy to contend with. Most people will pay $8-10 per month, but hike it to $50, and they'll start illegally downloading instead.

    As far as service providers are concerned, prices have actually gone down in the last few years for all but the most basic of internet services - at least in Canada. A few years ago, almost no one offered unlimited data, but now it's fairly common.
     
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  9. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

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    In a way they do.

    When I switched from DSL (3Mbps with a 1 Terrabyte(!) cap - no way to even come close at that speed) to Cable internet I had a 200Mbps connection - but a 250Gb data cap. It's just my wife and me and neither of us do much streaming (although I do quite a bit of dling - partly due to working on computers on the side on occasion). I kept a close eye on what we were using and would curtail my activities if it looked like we were close. It took 8 months before we finally went over (and that was when my son and his family were at the house for a week). The first month they just send a notice but warn that if you go over again you'll be charged an "overage fee." That fee is rather usurious when compared to the "regular" cost per Mb. A few months later when it was apparent we were about to go over again I just called and upped our speed to 400Mbps as it comes with unlimited data. The extra $$ for that is less than the overage fee (although it's monthly).

    The odd part is after upping our speed for the higher data cap our data usage seemed to drop significantly while I 100% know I was using much more than before (on purpose - partly to test that theory). I suspect they "fudge" the numbers to get people to do just what we did. Did we "need" the extra speed? Not at all.

    Right now my 16yo grandson is living with us, playing online games, watching videos, etc., and we still could "get by" with a 200Mbps connection - other than that artificially low data cap (we've hit 600Mb a few months with him here - far less than the 1 Terrabyte I had on DSL).

    I've argued that data caps should be speed caps instead. If I pay for 200Mbps then I should be able to pull that rate 24/7 with no added fees. If my needs outstrip the data rate then I simply pay for a faster connection.

    I could go to a 1Gbps connection but have no need for that much speed (few people truly do - even households with multiple "heavy" streamers - and it's quite rare to actually get that speed delivered due to the way ISPs allocate bandwidth).
     
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  10. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

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    I would be in heaven if the documentaries of interest to me, were easily available on bluray. But alas, documentaries of interest to me are largely non-existent on vhs/dvd/bluray.
     
  11. Traveling Matt

    Traveling Matt Supporting Actor

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    Assuming the 4K Blu-ray holds genuine 4K content in the first place. The format did itself no favors by premiering its first 10 titles with 8 or 9 HD upscales. Honestly that kept me from taking it seriously. I certainly wasn't going to consider building a library with genuine and non-genuine 4K discs.

    Retiring DVDs means retiring DVD players (and eventually BD playback of DVDs). That would be an enormous inconvenience for those needing to play their existing libraries - not just new purchases - and if anything, due to cost, inconvenience and probably distrust, would facilitate a move from DVD to streaming rather than BD for many people.

    Existing DVD libraries are a thing, and many people are not going to rebuy content. It's not all about new purchases, but it is about the ability to play the discs you've already got and aren't replacing.
     
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  12. Jesse Skeen

    Jesse Skeen Producer

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    DVD playback should of course always be supported, but it really makes no sense to keep releasing recent material on it. What exactly are all those people buying on DVD nowadays?

    I can play 4K discs but have been very lukewarm about the format since it can't also do 3D- and many of the first titles released were 2D presentations of 3D movies. I do buy all current 2D movies on it when it's available, but it hasn't wowed me enough to make it worth paying premium prices for it (if a title I want is priced too high I'll just do without it until the price comes down, I won't buy the cheaper format instead to save money but I might end up renting it on digital instead.)
     
  13. bmasters9

    bmasters9 Producer

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    I think you might want to correct that to " be made to look better"-- somewhat hard to understand for me.
     
  14. Blu Eye

    Blu Eye Stunt Coordinator

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    That seems a logical outcome.

    I will throw you another one (I'm a nuisance, I know).

    What if the younger generations completely lose all enthusiasm for watching films?

    This seems a plausible outcome from what I observe.

    This could potentially lead to streaming companies going the way of physical media.

    Then where does that leave us?
     
  15. Traveling Matt

    Traveling Matt Supporting Actor

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    The same content we're buying on BD or 4K BD. It's good enough for them and so they haven't upgraded. Simple as that. These are no doubt many of the same people who don't recognize OTA 4:3 stretched to 16:9.
     
  16. Worth

    Worth Producer

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    That makes sense from an enthusiast's perspective, but if you were a distributor, why would you get rid of it? DVD is cheaper to manufacture and still outsells blu-ray, which means greater profit.
     
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  17. Blu Eye

    Blu Eye Stunt Coordinator

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    I think you are probably correct in your assumptions that the ISP did those shenanigans to coerce you into upgrading.

    Are the streaming companies assuming most users (especially younger generations) hardly watch any films on a monthly basis but will still continue to pay the fees?

    Are they predicting a trend for this market in relation to that?

    If so, the true movie buffs who watch new content almost on a daily basis are going to suffer as the companies will have no incentive to have a wide variety of selection with their content.
     
  18. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

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    "Retiring" dvd players in priniciple can only be done via patent law enforcement. Though once the dvd-video patents expire, there is nothing to stop anybody from manufacturing generic bog standard dvd players which only play dvd-video discs.
     
  19. Worth

    Worth Producer

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    Television is definitely in a bubble right now. Streaming and conventional and cable networks aired 532 shows last year, and that's just the scripted stuff, not including documentaries and reality TV. There's no way that's sustainable. In a few years, Netflix is going to be in a position where its growth levels off, and it's not going to be able to throw billions into production the way it does now. People will pay for maybe 2 or 3 services, but that's about it - they're not going to spend hundreds of dollars a month to have everything.

    I suspect most of the new streamers are going to fall by the wayside within the next decade. A few like Apple and Amazon may continue to operate at a loss, if they feel it helps their core business somehow. I think we're going to see a huge contraction of the industry in a few years, until things level off and the volume of content is closer to what it was 15-20 years ago.
     
  20. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

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    I don't see a complete "retiring" of DVD *or* BR players for the forseeable future. Record players never went completely away and sales of vinyl records dropped far lower than DVD/BR sales before the retro fad brought 'em back.
     
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