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For the love of movies: The Past, Present, and Future of Cinema and what makes us fans (1 Viewer)

tsodcollector

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vertigo is one of hitchcock's best movies next to the birds,psycho,rear window,etc.this movie was early cinematic masterpiece,and this movie was no exception,if you check out at your local library or buying at amazon.com,it's a cinematic masterpiece.you can watch it with your children and your friends.
 

Reggie W

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Interesting article, file under "Old guys rock!" I guess....

--------------------

Warners’ first original feature of the Warner Bros. Discovery era is here … and it’s a period mobster drama fronted by two Hollywood veterans.

Returning to the genre that made him a household name, Robert De Niro will star in Wise Guys, a feature intended for theatrical distribution that will be directed by Barry Levinson, the filmmaker known for movies such as Oscar best picture winner Rain Man and Wag the Dog.

Nicholas Pileggi, who coincidentally authored Wiseguy, the 1985 book that was the basis for the 1990 De Niro-Martin Scorsese crime classic, Goodfellas, wrote the script. Irwin Winkler, best known for producing the Rocky movies as well as being a producer on Goodfellas, is a producer.

The project is centered on Vito Genovese and Frank Costello, two Italian-American crime bosses that ran their respective families in the middle of the 20th century. In 1957, Genovese attempted to assassinate Costello but failed, although he was wounded and decided to retire, as much as one can retire from the Mafia.

De Niro would play both characters, according to sources.

Wise Guys is an interesting choice for Warners, which under new president and CEO David Zaslav has been cutting and shelving projects, re-examining its DC slate, and figuring out which movies to push ahead on a theatrical level, now that the all-in-on-streaming strategy from the previous AT&T regime has been discarded. Zaslav has championed Wise Guys, with its pickup initiated in late May under Warners’ former Toby Emmerich regime. The project doesn’t seem to have the hallmarks of a tentpole — big budgets, visual effects, big intellectual property — nor does it feel like “young Hollywood,” something that would seemingly attract the demographic most known for going to the movies. Instead, it feels like a throwback, and has a team whose average age is four score — De Niro is 78, Levinson is 80, and Winkler is 91. (The studio, run by Michael De Luca and Pam Abdy, do have Joker: Folie a Deux as their first greenlight.)

Levinson was a prestigious Hollywood player in the 1980s and 1990s, with movies such as The Natural; Good Morning, Vietnam; Bugsy and Disclosure on his résumé. One of his biggest films was Rain Man, the 1988 drama that starred Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman. It was a runaway hit and won several Oscars, best picture and best director among them. Styles and tastes change, and in recent years the director has helmed features for the small screen, including HBO’s Paterno and The Wizard of Lies. The latter starred De Niro as disgraced financier Bernie Madoff and earned four Emmy nominations. De Niro and Levinson also worked together on 1997’s Wag the Dog and the 2008 Hollywood-centric tale What Just Happened.

 

tsodcollector

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Interesting article, file under "Old guys rock!" I guess....

--------------------

Warners’ first original feature of the Warner Bros. Discovery era is here … and it’s a period mobster drama fronted by two Hollywood veterans.

Returning to the genre that made him a household name, Robert De Niro will star in Wise Guys, a feature intended for theatrical distribution that will be directed by Barry Levinson, the filmmaker known for movies such as Oscar best picture winner Rain Man and Wag the Dog.

Nicholas Pileggi, who coincidentally authored Wiseguy, the 1985 book that was the basis for the 1990 De Niro-Martin Scorsese crime classic, Goodfellas, wrote the script. Irwin Winkler, best known for producing the Rocky movies as well as being a producer on Goodfellas, is a producer.

The project is centered on Vito Genovese and Frank Costello, two Italian-American crime bosses that ran their respective families in the middle of the 20th century. In 1957, Genovese attempted to assassinate Costello but failed, although he was wounded and decided to retire, as much as one can retire from the Mafia.

De Niro would play both characters, according to sources.

Wise Guys is an interesting choice for Warners, which under new president and CEO David Zaslav has been cutting and shelving projects, re-examining its DC slate, and figuring out which movies to push ahead on a theatrical level, now that the all-in-on-streaming strategy from the previous AT&T regime has been discarded. Zaslav has championed Wise Guys, with its pickup initiated in late May under Warners’ former Toby Emmerich regime. The project doesn’t seem to have the hallmarks of a tentpole — big budgets, visual effects, big intellectual property — nor does it feel like “young Hollywood,” something that would seemingly attract the demographic most known for going to the movies. Instead, it feels like a throwback, and has a team whose average age is four score — De Niro is 78, Levinson is 80, and Winkler is 91. (The studio, run by Michael De Luca and Pam Abdy, do have Joker: Folie a Deux as their first greenlight.)

Levinson was a prestigious Hollywood player in the 1980s and 1990s, with movies such as The Natural; Good Morning, Vietnam; Bugsy and Disclosure on his résumé. One of his biggest films was Rain Man, the 1988 drama that starred Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman. It was a runaway hit and won several Oscars, best picture and best director among them. Styles and tastes change, and in recent years the director has helmed features for the small screen, including HBO’s Paterno and The Wizard of Lies. The latter starred De Niro as disgraced financier Bernie Madoff and earned four Emmy nominations. De Niro and Levinson also worked together on 1997’s Wag the Dog and the 2008 Hollywood-centric tale What Just Happened.

you also forget avalon,stars aidan quinn,kevin pollak,elizabeth perkins,and elijah wood.thast was one of his biggest movies.
 

Reggie W

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Always interesting to hear directors talk about other directors and their pictures. Carpenter is not complimentary here and I like the directors and pictures he seems not to like:

 

benbess

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Some parts of CE3K are a bit drawn out, and it's not in my top ten of Spielberg movies. But CE3K has a big point and pov, whether you agree with it or not. It didn't get out of control—it was just an early Spielberg epic.

There's only one Carpenter movie I'd rate an A+, and that's The Thing.

In contrast, there are more than twenty Spielberg movies that I'd say are near great to great. Plus even the Spielberg movies that I'd rate a B or B+ almost always have good rewatch value.

Spielberg is one of the best directors of all time, and from my pov probably even the greatest if you look at his whole filmography. Spielberg has directed over thirty movies, almost all of which are somewhere from watchable to great. The only director close to that score that I can think of is Hitchcock, but I think at this point Spielberg has more wins than Hitch.
 

Capt D McMars

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Some parts of CE3K are a bit drawn out, and it's not in my top ten of Spielberg movies. But CE3K has a big point and pov, whether you agree with it or not. It didn't get out of control—it was just an early Spielberg epic.

There's only one Carpenter movie I'd rate an A+, and that's The Thing.

In contrast, there are more than twenty Spielberg movies that I'd say are near great to great. Plus even the Spielberg movies that I'd rate a B or B+ almost always have good rewatch value.

Spielberg is one of the best directors of all time, and from my pov probably even the greatest if you look at his whole filmography. Spielberg has directed over thirty movies, almost all of which are somewhere from watchable to great. The only director close to that score that I can think of is Hitchcock, but I think at this point Spielberg has more wins than Hitch.
For me, the other Carpenter Romps are Big Trouble in Little China and Escape from New York...again both with the star of The Thing, Kurt Russell.
 

TravisR

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Some parts of CE3K are a bit drawn out, and it's not in my top ten of Spielberg movies. But CE3K has a big point and pov, whether you agree with it or not. It didn't get out of control—it was just an early Spielberg epic.

There's only one Carpenter movie I'd rate an A+, and that's The Thing.

In contrast, there are more than twenty Spielberg movies that I'd say are near great to great. Plus even the Spielberg movies that I'd rate a B or B+ almost always have good rewatch value.

Spielberg is one of the best directors of all time, and from my pov probably even the greatest if you look at his whole filmography. Spielberg has directed over thirty movies, almost all of which are somewhere from watchable to great. The only director close to that score that I can think of is Hitchcock, but I think at this point Spielberg has more wins than Hitch.
I think it's worth noting that John Carpenter has always been a contrarian so of course, he's going to say that whoever and whatever is hot at the moment sucks. :laugh: This interview is from the set of Halloween so him bashing Close Encounters and Star Wars is exactly what I'd expect him to say in May of 1978.
 

jayembee

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Really, guys? Not Halloween? I thought Carpenter's Halloween II was a generic slasher film, but the original still creeps the bejeezus out of me despite the number of times I've seen it. While it almost single-handedly started the wave of slasher films back in the day, it itself is almost the complete opposite of the slasher template.

I'm not a fan of horror films (at least post-1970), but Halloween is one that I am happy to watch over and over.

That said, I was something of a Carpenter fan back in the day, but I find his films in general don't hold up. Halloween, The Thing, and Big Trouble in Little China are the only ones I continue to be interested in watching. Possibly Dark Star and Assault on Precinct 13, too, though I haven't seen either one in ages, so I'm uncertain if I'd still like them.

And I'm not a big fan of most of Spielberg's work, either. So I really have no dog in this fight.
 

TravisR

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Really, guys? Not Halloween? I thought Carpenter's Halloween II was a generic slasher film, but the original still creeps the bejeezus out of me despite the number of times I've seen it. While it almost single-handedly started the wave of slasher films back in the day, it itself is almost the complete opposite of the slasher template.

I'm not a fan of horror films (at least post-1970), but Halloween is one that I am happy to watch over and over.
Halloween is my all-time favorite movie and I also love nearly every movie Spielberg has ever made. I just chalk this up to Carpenter being Carpenter. :laugh:
 

Reggie W

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Some parts of CE3K are a bit drawn out, and it's not in my top ten of Spielberg movies. But CE3K has a big point and pov, whether you agree with it or not. It didn't get out of control—it was just an early Spielberg epic.

There's only one Carpenter movie I'd rate an A+, and that's The Thing.

In contrast, there are more than twenty Spielberg movies that I'd say are near great to great. Plus even the Spielberg movies that I'd rate a B or B+ almost always have good rewatch value.

Spielberg is one of the best directors of all time, and from my pov probably even the greatest if you look at his whole filmography. Spielberg has directed over thirty movies, almost all of which are somewhere from watchable to great. The only director close to that score that I can think of is Hitchcock, but I think at this point Spielberg has more wins than Hitch.

I never look at things as a contest and who is best but more so does the picture draw me in and get me involved. I love Close Encounters but I think at the time of this interview Carpenter felt that a picture like that with a huge budget was more a self-indulgent exorcise. That you got excess for excess sake. Carpenter worked his magic on much smaller budgets than Spielberg got.

He feels Close Encounters did not show an authoritative director's hand but I definitely think that Spielberg is an authoritative storyteller in that picture. He knows what he wants to say and has a grasp on the language of cinema to put his stamp on things while telling a good story. In comparison to the more economical approach, influenced by Hawks and Ford, that Carpenter takes to his films, I think you could say Close Encounters looks bloated.
 

Reggie W

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For me, the other Carpenter Romps are Big Trouble in Little China and Escape from New York...again both with the star of The Thing, Kurt Russell.

I think, off the top of my head, the only Carpenter picture I did not love was his invisible man movie with Chevy Chase, which just did not really work. Ghosts of Mars was not great but it grew on me and the Escape from LA picture was just too much a remake of Escape from New York and so served no real purpose. Maybe he was doing a Hawks thing there as with Rio Bravo and El Dorado but El Dorado, in my book, is a great film.
 

Reggie W

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I think it's worth noting that John Carpenter has always been a contrarian so of course, he's going to say that whoever and whatever is hot at the moment sucks. :laugh: This interview is from the set of Halloween so him bashing Close Encounters and Star Wars is exactly what I'd expect him to say in May of 1978.

I think Carpenter, like Spielberg, makes movies because he loves movies. So, I think Carpenter likes to make movies that are designed as pure entertainment. You give the viewer a beginning, middle, and end and you drive right at these things as the story moves along. You always stay economical with your storytelling in his world and you trim out any fat. He seems a direct descendant of Howard Hawks. He does not believe in wasting time to make his point.

Starman is really Carpenter's entry in the Close Encounters/ET genre. It's a great film and he is very direct in how he tells his story. The Thing is a horror film and it is designed to be frightening. Starman gives us a creature from space that is more like the aliens in Spielberg's pictures. Not dangerous, friendly and open to having an experience with humans. I think it is every bit as good as those Spielberg films.
 

TravisR

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I think, off the top of my head, the only Carpenter picture I did not love was his invisible man movie with Chevy Chase, which just did not really work. Ghosts of Mars was not great but it grew on me and the Escape from LA picture was just too much a remake of Escape from New York and so served no real purpose. Maybe he was doing a Hawks thing there as with Rio Bravo and El Dorado but El Dorado, in my book, is a great film.
I'm in a minority but I'm even a fan of Carpenter's 1990's output. The only stuff from him that I don't like is Memoirs Of An Invisible Man and the Masters Of Horror episode, Pro-Life (which is just cheap looking and a big letdown after his previous episode).
 

Reggie W

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Really, guys? Not Halloween? I thought Carpenter's Halloween II was a generic slasher film, but the original still creeps the bejeezus out of me despite the number of times I've seen it. While it almost single-handedly started the wave of slasher films back in the day, it itself is almost the complete opposite of the slasher template.

I'm not a fan of horror films (at least post-1970), but Halloween is one that I am happy to watch over and over.

That said, I was something of a Carpenter fan back in the day, but I find his films in general don't hold up. Halloween, The Thing, and Big Trouble in Little China are the only ones I continue to be interested in watching. Possibly Dark Star and Assault on Precinct 13, too, though I haven't seen either one in ages, so I'm uncertain if I'd still like them.

And I'm not a big fan of most of Spielberg's work, either. So I really have no dog in this fight.

Carpenter mentions in the clip he likes Polanski. He seems to have definitely incorporated into Halloween things Polanski did in Rosemary's Baby and obviously Polanski loved Hitchcock as well. Halloween is a great picture because the story is perfectly told. Carpenter completely understands how to build suspense and get under your skin. I think he probably got the suspense part from Hitchcock and the get under your skin part from Rosemary's Baby because that picture has a very creepy way of getting under your skin. Both Halloween and Rosemary's Baby create a really suffocating environment that their characters inhabit. You always feel this unease that they just can't escape the evil that awaits them.
 

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