For audio, add sub or upgrade mains?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by RobCar, Nov 27, 2002.

  1. RobCar

    RobCar Stunt Coordinator

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    In my small living room (12x10), I'm starting to think that I need a little more depth to my sound. I have bookshelves (bostons, cr-6) and am considering getting a sub, but is that a good setup for music? Subs seem popular for HT setups, but not sure if I should get the sub for music primarily or instead invest in a new set of mains w/ more bass. Any suggestions? Thanks!
     
  2. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    this is a tough call.

    it sounds like you'll be listening primarily to music?

    if so, i think some new mains may be a better choice. subs always seem to "color" the music too much.

    but, if you're happy with the way your boston's sound (excluding bass) and you can find a sub that blends well, then you've killed two birds with one stone.

    just remember that it's not as simple as adding a sub and turning it on. you have to worry about placement, creating a seamless crossover, etc.

    how about just getting the sub first? if you don't like it you can return it then get some new mains.
     
  3. RobCar

    RobCar Stunt Coordinator

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    One thought is that I might eventually get both a sub and new fronts, on my way to 5.1 ... in which case, if I got the sub first and used it for, say, half a year w/ the current bookshelves, it'd sound ok for music?
     
  4. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    if your goal is an eventual 5.1 system, then you need to keep the concept of "timbre matching" in mind.
    timbre matching means that all 5 speakers will have the same sonic characteristics. that means the motorcycle in the left speaker will still sound like a motorcycle (and not a moped) when it gets to your center speaker.
    most manufacturers have specific models (or speaker packages) designed exclusively with this intent.
    so, if you go the piece-by-piece route, just keep that in mind.
    btw - you don't have to timbre-match a sub either. you can pretty much use any sub with any speaker array.
    hope that helps some...if not keep asking! [​IMG]
    oh yeah...your original question. [​IMG]
     
  5. Reece

    Reece Stunt Coordinator

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    Why not invest in a good pair of front towers that can add some depth to your music by fulfilling your bass requirements while not sacrificing the overall sound by getting "boomy"? Then later on if you add a sub for HT the towers will allow you to lower the crossover point and let the sub rule the true low end material.

    Just a suggestion.
     
  6. RobCar

    RobCar Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for all the great suggestions. Towers of course sound better than bookshelves and would usually be a great solution, but as I said, the room's really small, so i think I need to stick with the 'shelves. Thanks again, guys!
     
  7. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Towers don't necessarily sound better than bookshelf speakers. They may extend lower, but that doesn't make them "better". Since bookshelf speakers typically use smaller woofers they often have much better midrange quality than a tower which uses a larger woofer.

    If you do choose to buy towers, take some CD's with you that have really great vocals and some acoustic guitars in them. If they have the same quality midrange reproduction AND extend lower, then I'd consider them better.

    My own personal opinion is that I'd buy the sub. You'll need it if you go with a 5.1 (or 7.1) system later.
     
  8. Dan Hine

    Dan Hine Screenwriter

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    I own Polk RT1000i Tower speakers. They are now in my bedroom running on my computer. Adire's HE10's (monitor sized speakers) replaced them in the HT. In other words, I agree with Brian. [​IMG] Towers are not necessarily better. I too would go with a sub...as long as it is a quality sub. Don't rush out and get the newest KLH special. Do you have a specific budget in mind?
     
  9. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Dan,
    You're so PC! Nice to know that someone agrees with me! [​IMG]
     
  10. RobCar

    RobCar Stunt Coordinator

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    OK, so sub over better mains is the consensus, even for music primarily. I was tempted by a pair of bigger bookshelves today, but that would've left me wondering what to do with the existing speakers between now and 5.1 ... so, any recs for a small sub (remember, small room) for, say, $300?
     
  11. Brian Burgoyne

    Brian Burgoyne Second Unit

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    For $399 + shipping you can get the Adire Rava. Brian Bunge also makes subs. The Adire is reported to be good for music.
     
  12. RobertSchaez

    RobertSchaez Stunt Coordinator

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    I bought my sub for mainly for HT, but found I love it for music as well. I agree with the others on a sub being the better choice for more bass. That's what subs are designed to do and they're rather good at it. You also have more flexibility in placement so it sounds the best with your room setup.

    Make sure you get one that is good for music. Some are not as tight as others and won't blend well with your speakers, and the last thing you want is to be able to know the sub is over there, thumping away.

    Within a given budget, better to to with quality, not quantity. A good 8 inch sub will sound better for music than a cheap 12 inch.

    Make sure you can return it for a full refund if it doesn't work out. I would stay away from internet-only companies if you're not sure you want to use one. Returning hassle and paying for shipping takes the fun out of it!
     

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