Flush Mounting and veneer

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jassen M. West, Mar 4, 2003.

  1. Jassen M. West

    Jassen M. West Supporting Actor

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    When using a router to create the c'bore to mount the driver do you take into account the thickness of the veneer? Also how do you cut the circle into the veneer for the driver to fit through? When should veneering be done before the c'bore for the flush mount or after?

    thanks,
    jay
     
  2. Ronnie Ferrell

    Ronnie Ferrell Second Unit

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    This is the way I do it. FYI: It is just one of many different approaches...

    I cut the through hole for the tweeter on the front baffle before gluing up the enclosure. I veneer it after glue up. Then I use a rabbeting bit to create the rebate. Mine was a 1/2" rebate and I happened to have a 1/2" rabbeting bit.

    Another way is to use a jasper jig to cut the rebate before cutting the through hole. I did this for the terminal cups on the back of the speakers. This would be the same as using a rabbeting bit before veneering. If you do this with a tweeter, you have to measure (guess) the thickness of your veneer and back off the rebate in the MDF a little. After veneering, cut a hole in the veneer big enough for the same rabbeting bit to fit through. set the depth of the bit to just over the thickness of the veneer. Run it around the through hole again to trim the veneer. If you did the jasper jig rebate, I guess you would have to freehand trim the veneer with a sharp utility knife. Brian Bunge took a veneer trim bit, the kind that just has a nub on the end and not a bearing, and cut mist of the nub off. That way it will fit in the rebate depth and trim the veneer without making the rebate any larger.

    Ronnie
     
  3. Zac_F

    Zac_F Agent

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    For practical reasons, I do the veneer last. You'll be handling the box a lot during construction and you don't want to mess up the veneer.

    That being said, it is easier to veneer first, then cut the hole, since then all of your measurements include the veneer thickness, and the circle gets cut into the veneer.

    If the driver is too deep in the hole, you can always add filler, such as foam, to bring it up.
     
  4. Dan Wesnor

    Dan Wesnor Second Unit

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    I have been forced (by the use of a vacuum press) to cut holes after veneering, and found that it is much easier.
     
  5. Ronnie Ferrell

    Ronnie Ferrell Second Unit

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  6. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    I've used both methods. It's pretty safe to cut your rebates and holes after veneering if your drivers are round. That allows you to use your circle-cutting jig (I highly recommend the Jasper) to do the cuts and it will control the router just fine. If your driver frames are other than round, then you might want to veneer after cutting your rebates and holes. As I always say, try both methods on scrap MDF and veneer and see which you feel more comfortable with.
     

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