Flexy rack question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Ed_A, Jan 25, 2002.

  1. Ed_A

    Ed_A Stunt Coordinator

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    I’m currently working on a flexy rack. I’d like to have the 5/8” diameter all-thread that runs through each shelf to terminate flush (or somewhat flush) with the top surface of the top shelf. I’m thinking there might be a bolt or end cap that’s relatively flat that can screw into the all-thread. Any ideas?
    The Salamander Archetype racks have this feature but I’m not sure how to get this done. You can see an example at:
    http://www.salamanderdesigns.com/archetype/index.htm
    If Myram reads this: I saw the flexy TV stand on your website; very nice. I am building my rack similar to yours. Your TV sits on your TV rack, on top of these "top shelf bolt securing points" that I mention above...did you terminate it flush? Here's the site:
    http://www.angelfire.com/me4/myram/
    BTW, all my shelves are 3/4" thick plywood that I'm staining. The rack will be for my 32" Sony Vega...and I can't decide on how low or high to place the TV. Can anybody recommend an ideal viewing height? (i.e. center of screen at eye level, bottom of screen at eye level, etc.)
    Thanks for your help,
    Ed
     
  2. Chris Hoppe

    Chris Hoppe Stunt Coordinator

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    Sure! You can use a thread coupler and a carriage bolt to accomplish this. The coupler is about 2 1/2" long. You'll need a carriage bolt (it has a round flat head) that is about 2" long. Put the carriage bolt down through the hole in the top shelf, then screw the coupler in from the other side. Now thread the rod into that from the bottom...
     
  3. Ryan Schnacke

    Ryan Schnacke Supporting Actor

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    That carriage bolt idea sounds cool. I may try that on my next flexy project - stair-step shelves for my wife. For my flexy TV stand, there was only one rod that had to be flush. The one in the middle at the back. So I just drilled the hole and fed the rod up until it was flush on the top side. I used two nuts underneath the top shelf so they could lock against each other. The TV covers this area, so you don't notice the funny looking hole with metal rod in it. You can sort of see it in this pic.
    http://us.f1.yahoofs.com/users/d8f1a...ptfo8A7g4fFlTZ
    Here you can see the two nuts below the top shelf.
    http://us.f1.yahoofs.com/users/d8f1a...ptfo8AcQeQE5QZ
    If those links don't work then just go here and flip through my photos.
    http://photos.yahoo.com/ryan_schnacke/
     
  4. Ryan Schnacke

    Ryan Schnacke Supporting Actor

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    BTW, if you flip through my photos you'll see the stand with my components and 32" JVC TV on it. I went with 5/8", 2 feet long all-thread rods. Home Depot sells them in 2 feet, 6 feet, and maybe even 10 feet sections. Lowes has 1 foot, 3 feet and 6 feet. The casters add just a little more height.
     
  5. Ed_A

    Ed_A Stunt Coordinator

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    Chris, that sounds like it would work. Thanks. [​IMG]
    Ryan, nice TV stand you built there. From the pics it looks like you veneered the edges of the boards? I'm trying to figure out what to do the the 3/4" edges, they don't stain well at all...How did you go about doing that? Where did you get the veneer to apply? And to match?
    Thanks,
    Ed
     
  6. Ryan Schnacke

    Ryan Schnacke Supporting Actor

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    Lowes or Home Depot sells birch and oak veneer in a roll that's just a little over 3/4 wide and 20-25 ft long. Its already got glue on the back so you just have to iron it on. It's about $5 - $7 a roll, so not exactly cheap. But it was very easy.

    I cut a strip about 1-2 inches longer than I needed for a side. Then just started at one end and iron it on. I covered the hot plate of the iron with aluminum foil to keep it clean, but it wasn't messy at all. I did a small section at a time, maybe 6 inches. Doesn't take long for the glue to melt at a hi-temp setting. Then use a wood block to hold that section firmly down while the glue cools. Then move on to the next section. Once you're done with a side trim the 2 ends to just a tiny bit beyond the end of the wood. Then do the next side.

    Since the veneer is slightly wider than the 3/4" wood it sticks out a couple of millimeters and looks kinda funny. But its really easy to sand it down to where you can hardly see the seem at all.

    I was surprised at how easy and well the veneering went. Takes a while, doing 6 inches at a time. But the result was worth it. I'll be doing the same on my wife's shelves.
     
  7. Stephen Teffner

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    Here's something I did on my last couple of Flexy's I built. On the top shelf, where I wanted the bolts and washers to sit somewhat flush. I just routed out a circle big enough for the washers to fit in, and deep enough so that you only see the top of the nuts. They're not counter sunk all the way through but there is about a 1/4 of an inch thickness in that area (if you can picture it?). You might want to give this a try.

    Stephen Teffner
     
  8. DougKlon

    DougKlon Auditioning

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    Hi -
    I've got the same problem right now (wanting a flush top shelf). The coupler and carriage bolt might work, if I sink the bolt enough that the rounded top isn't sticking out.
    My project is a clone of the Salamander archetype with a TV stand, as seen here, http://www.salamanderdesigns.com/arc...3?modelbase=tv
    What I am wondering is if I could just run all 4 threaded rod legs up flush to the top, then just put a cap on there. It wouldn't be fastened down by a nut the way the other shelves are, but it's not like it's going to go flying away. Would this be safe? Has anyone else built a rack like this and figured out a good solution? Thanks!
    Doug Klon
     
  9. Jonathan M

    Jonathan M Second Unit

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    Another option is to fasten a nut up into the underside of the top shelf. You could either glue this nut on to the underside of the shelf and then thread the rod up in to it (And maybe a little into the shelf), or you could drill a shallow hole (Just deep enough for the nut) into the underside of the shelf slightly smaller than the diameter of the nut, and tap it in with a hammer. That way the nut will fit nice and snug, and won't rotate when you thread the rod up in to it.

    Both these methods will give a flush top with no trace of the rod viewable from the top, as no hole has gone right through the shelf. Remember that there isn't a lot of upward pressure on any shelves (Mostly downwards), and so it could probably even just sit on top of the nuts without any glue. The glued in nuts would just give a little more support.
     
  10. Greg.K

    Greg.K Screenwriter

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    On my flexy rack, I first countersunk a hole big enough for a half-height jam nut to fit in flush at the top, then drilled the hole for the threaded rod.
    I capped it off with a metal hole cap painted flat black. It worked pretty well.
    Pictures
    Closeup
     
  11. Clif Forsyth

    Clif Forsyth Extra

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    To get a flush top shelf on my flexy I laminated 2 3/4" pieces of oak ply together. Before I did that I counter sunk a t-nut into the top of the bottom piece threaded a 3/8" rod into it. Then I used a reducer coupling nut to tighten the t-nut into place. The reducer coupling nut is 3/8 on one end and 5/8 on the other. Then I glued the 2 pieces together. I couldn't find edge banding wider than 1 inch so I bought some paper backed Oak veneer and cut 2" strips from it. I then spread wood glue on the edge banding and on the side of the shelf. Let it dry for 15-20 mins then used an iron to glue the edgeing on. Once the top shelf was done I then threaded my 5/8" allthread into the coupling nuts. I covered the allthread with 2" aluminum tubing which I sanded to a nice brushed finish and then coated them with wipe on satin poly to prevent finger printing. All in all it turned out great and there is nothing visible to indicate how the top shelf is secured.
     

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