Flat Screen vs HDTV

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Carlos Garcia, Mar 28, 2002.

  1. Carlos Garcia

    Carlos Garcia Screenwriter

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    I want to buy a 32" TV set and I'm looking for some advice on this.

    I've come down to two options: Toshiba 32" Stereo TV with Flat Picture Tube — 32AF41 and Samsung 32" DynaFlat HDTV Monitor — TSL3293HF, the price difference is $300.

    Is there really a difference between them? Is it worth $300?

    I'm kind of skeptical since I read yesterday an article saying that HDTV's probably are going to be obsolete in 2-3 years.
     
  2. Marc Rochkind

    Marc Rochkind Second Unit

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    Can't speak about these specific models, but I have a Samsung 27" flat screen HDTV that's terrific.
     
  3. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Yes, Carlos, the HD-capable Samsung will look superior. And, no, HDTV is not going to be "obsolete" soon--whatever copy-protection scheme is settled upon will not render high-def obsolete. (I'm concerned about what you may be reading.)
     
  4. Jeremy Engel

    Jeremy Engel Extra

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    I think you mean that analog tvs will be obsolite in about 3 years. Hdtv monitors are not going to be obsolite.
     
  5. Drew Eckhardt

    Drew Eckhardt Stunt Coordinator

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    The paranoid putzes who run the entertainment industry have added weasel clauses to the specifications and attached licensing requirements that disallow analog output at resolutions with an equivalent resolution of more than 520,000 pixels (960x540p) on sources which are marked to only allow constrained analog outputs.

    Buy a set which has only analog inputs, and you won't be getting HD resolutions off pre-recorded media, cable, etc. once this technology is used (IOW, your set will offer 1/4 1080i or 2/3 720p HD resolution) unless you jump through hoops (the encryption is cryptographically weak, and there are exemptions for "computer" products provided they don't output in "consumer" component formats (although transcoders are available).

    Buy JVC's $1000 D-VHS deck which implements the constrained output as a down-conversion to 480i, and once this is used you'll be stuck with quality no better than DVD on new releases.

    1/4 to 2/3 the performance of newer sets that accept digital inputs or being no better than a five-year old 480p set will constitute "obsolete" to many people.

    Fortunately, for small sets in traditional domestic settings this isn't as bad as it sounds: with average visual acuity you'd need to sit four feet from a 32" 4:3 set to be able to resolve 1080i, and still less than six feet for 720p.

    If you're going to buy a new set anyways, it can't hurt to buy a HD set at the same price - there will be some time before constrained output becomes the rule, and you may be able to get that at better than line-doubled NTSC resolutions.

    Personally I would (did) get something (CRT front projection) capable of analog HDTV. If nothing else, it will do a fine job of playing DVDs for the next five years at which point we may or may not have a reasonable HD pre-recorded library and rental infrastructure that renders it "obsolete"
     

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