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FIRST SONOSUB attempt...tell me what ya think!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mike_Ped, Oct 16, 2001.

  1. Mike_Ped

    Mike_Ped Second Unit

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    Welp, finished plans on my first sonosub and got my amp for it. Tell me what you think. (used adire's software)
    Driver: Tempest 15"
    Amp: Carver m500t (700 Watts mono 4 ohm)
    Sonotube:
    250 liters (24" wide, 36" height)
    1 flared vent - 17" long x 4" wide (on bottom cap)
    50% fill
    Tuned to 13.0 Hz
    I'm going to be using the 3/4" MDF for the top and bottom caps, and was planning on putting a floor plate 2" under the bottom cap (is there a specific distance you should keep this plate from the bottom cap?)
    I used to following website to do all unit conversions and for LspCAD help. http://www.quux.net/roo/diy/sonosub/
    Lemme know what you think and if you have and suggestions. This is my first attempt and I'm ready to be "critiqued" (go ahead and tear me apart...what the hell) Thanx
    Mike
    BTW - Can anyone explain the whole piano black shine thing to me.
     
  2. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    Looks great! A ported Shiva is going to deliver a lot of bass. As far as the piano finish... you need a smooth surface to start with. So, you will need to do something about the seams on the sonotube (wood filler and alot of sanding). Then you will need to apply layer after layer (10-12) of enamel preferrably applied with an airbrush (like a car). And probably a couple clear coats as well.
    Dave Poehlman
    (see my sealed shiva at http:\paleface.topcities.com)
     
  3. Mike_Ped

    Mike_Ped Second Unit

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    Thanx for the input Dave
    Anyone else have their .2 cents?
    Also, can anyone ellaborate on the piano black finish thing. The Patcave has a lot of info, but I'm unclear about the whole wetsanding thing. Thanx
    Mike
     
  4. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Wetsanding
    The main thing is preparation.
    1. Apply spray primer on the surface. Sand until smooth. Use various grit, working from coarse 80/100 grit, apply more primer, sand with higher grit until you get up to 200 grit or 400 grit. Once you are satisfied with the smoothness of the surface, and you can start on applying the paint.
    WARNING - don't mix lacquer paint with enamel paint, stick with one or the other.
    2. Once you apply a healthy coat of paint to the surface (make sure the temperature is not too cold, above 50 degree F), let it dry. Once it's dry, you can start the wetsanding process.
    3. Use wetsandpaper (you can get various grit, from 400-600 at Home Depot, and then 1000-1500 grit at automotive parts stores like Auto Zone), sprinkle warm water on the painted surface, and sand with the wetsandpaper, sanding it smooth and smoother as you work up on the grit. Wipe surface dry, allow it to dry completely before another coat of paint.
    4. Apply another coat of paint. Each coat should go on and cover more smoothly than the last coat after each wetsanding session. You basically move up in grit until you get up to 1000 or 1500 grit. So, you have to repeat the process quite a few times.
    5. Once you get to the last coat of paint, you don't sand that final coat unless you have imperfections, then you have to wetsand them away until it's smooth.
    6. Then you'll have to apply a few coats of clear coat and may have to do the wetsand process for those coats of clear coat paint.
    It's a lot of pain and hassle (I don't think I'll ever do it again).
    An alternate way is to wetsand a few coats, and then use something like Meguire's to give it that lustre of the final coat of paint.
    Julian Data had a nice write-up, but he's not been around of late, so maybe someone else has a link to his write-up.
    ------------------
    PatCave; HT Pix; Gear; DIY Mains; DIY CC; Sunosub I + II + III; DVDs; LDs
     
  5. Robin Smith

    Robin Smith Stunt Coordinator

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    I don't know exactly what the number should be, but I am certain that 2" is not enough clearance for your floor plate. I think you should shoot for 4" or more. If Patrick, Jack or one of the many other experts visits your thread they'll be able to give you a better number. But 2" is definitely not enough room.
    Do a search as I am sure there was a thread on this a while ago. Also, check out Eric Jones's EMJ Home theatre http://www.jones4.com/ and view his sonosub, it has a beautiful sonosub with a floor plate that according to the site is 3" from the bottom endcap.
    Good luck
     
  6. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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  7. Mike_Ped

    Mike_Ped Second Unit

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    Thanx for all the replies.
    I can see how that piano black finish is going to be difficult, but I want to make ONE of these ONCE...so I'm just gonna have to learn a little patience I guess and I'm going to go for it.
    One more quick question. If I put a plate 4" under the driver, should I or should I not bother putting spikes under on the bottom? I'm going to be using this on carpet but wanna be able to move it to uncarpeted floors just in case I have to someday (i was thinking of putting some threaded wood inserts in the bottom of the plate so that I can screw or unscrew the spikes at will)
    Thanx again!
     
  8. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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    I agree I'd use 4" or so as the distance b/t the driver and the base plate. Also a single flared 4" vent is not going to give you enough vent area to let this sub breath. You've picked a great driver, optimized the internal volume, have good power but are chocking it with the vent. I've got three 4" ports (non flared) on the bottom of my sub which is very similar in design to the one you are planning on building.
    ------------------
    http://www.mts.net/~glendap/
     
  9. Mike_Ped

    Mike_Ped Second Unit

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    Hmmm...
    I was orginally planning on going with three 4" ports (slightly shorter in length), but I changed my mind because it seemed I got a better graphs with lspCAD. Also, I heard using ONE 6" port is kinda like using 3 4" port. Is that right?
    I'll have to play with lspCAD a little more to find about this stuff. Thanx
    Mike
     

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