Firewire (IEEE 1394) questions

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by BarbM, Jan 4, 2004.

  1. BarbM

    BarbM Auditioning

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    I am upgrading my home entertainment system and am about to get a rear projection HD tv (I think the Mits WS55413.) I am also going to upgrade my receiver (my current one is an old Dolby pro logic and I am liking the new Yamaha RXV1400.) I have noticed that there are options to get models of both the tv and the receiver that have Firewire capability. I also have Tivo through Comcast and plan to upgrade to HD Tivo when it comes out.

    I have questions about whether I should care about getting a tv and a receiver with Firewire? What kind of things will use Firewire down the road and can't I get the same digital quality with another interface that my tv and receiver might come with? The cost does jump up a bit on both components, but I also don't want to regret not doing it in a couple of years.

    Thanks ahead of time for any help you can give me on this decision.

    -- Barb
     
  2. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    Hi Barb. I'm sure someone else will be able to give a more thorough answer, but I have a small amount of information to share.

    About three years ago I worked in retail selling electronics. At that time there was some discussion about what method will be used to transfer a digital signal from the airwaves to a set-top box to the tv. Everything from component cables to DVI to firewire was mentioned. To my knowledge no standard has been set. That being said it seems to me that more companies are leaning toward component and DVI than firewire. However, there may be other uses for the firewire port that I am not aware of.
     
  3. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    i didn't realize the yamaha had firewire capability. that's pretty cool.

    the whole idea of firewire is to allow for one "intelligent" connection. with firewire, the components could actually talk to eachother, control eachother, etc. they would automatically know how many vcr or dvd players were connected, etc. stuff like that...

    i know mits is touting this feature and i think it's necessary for their netcommand (or whatever it's called). i have the 65313 myself, but haven't even really researched it too much.

    the problem is there are still so many different interfaces out there right now. from what i've read, i keep hearing that HDMI (?) is going to be the connection of choice. hdmi is essentially a dvi connection with audio capabilities.

    your mits should also have the dvi connection.

    tbh, while i like the idea of a single connection (like firewire) .... i just don't see it taking off in the immediate future.

    also, remember that you're buying a tv to watch it - base your decision on the picture quality. [​IMG]
     
  4. BarbM

    BarbM Auditioning

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    Thanks for the great feedback.

    The Yamaha model that has firewire is a higher end one and is pretty pricey, BTW.

    If my Mits has DVI, is that all I need to get HDMI? Will my receiver also need to have DVI?

    Thanks!
     
  5. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    hmm...hope i didn't confuse ya more! [​IMG]

    the dvi connection is a video-only connection. it's typically used between the dvd player and the tv. it provides a digital connection -- which (in theory) should provide a better picture.

    there is no audio signal present in a dvi connection.

    hdmi is a combination of digital video and audio - it's really a totally different connection.

    if your mits has dvi, then you should definitely think about getting a dvd player with a dvi connection. two popular models are the samsung 931 (which i have) and the bravo v-1.

    this way, you'll utilize the best video connection for your tv. if your gear supports hdmi (semi-doubtful), then that's all the better!
     
  6. BarbM

    BarbM Auditioning

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    Hi Ted,

    Okay, now I get HDMI, thanks. Now, the question is, how will I know if the Mits I am looking at and the Yamaha receiver have HDMI connections?

    Thanks again.
     
  7. BarbM

    BarbM Auditioning

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    I found an interesting article that I can't post because I haven't posted enough times on this site, but it basically says that HDMI will be available later this year over standard DVI connections if you use a converter connector. It didn't sound like a big deal. The question I have is, hypothetically, would this connector degrade the quality of the signal, or is digital always good quality no matter what?

    Here is an excerpt from the article:

    "The first HDMI-equipped televisions and DVD players were introduced by Panasonic, Pioneer and Sony in September.

    This year, Philips will introduce a line of HDMI-compatible digital TVs, DVD players and recorders and a set-top box.

    Other companies are expected to follow. The HDMI standard is also being adopted by LG Electronics, Mitsubishi, Pioneer, Samsung, Sharp and manufacturers of various set-top boxes.

    While consumer electronic companies have the right to manufacture digital TVs and peripheral equipment using only HDMI connectors, they are unlikely to do so any time soon because such devices would be incompatible with current equipment which only has analog connectors.

    Instead, HDMI inputs and outputs will be one more connection choice on the back of each piece of gear.

    The new connector can work with DVI, allowing those who own sets with the older video-only DVI inputs to use it with a simple convertor plug.

    The connectors will also be able to send set-up information between devices. For example, if a manufacturer includes the necessary software, the HDMI connection can send a signal from the DVD player to the digital television with directions that the movie it is about to play is coming in on input one and will be in wide-screen format.

    Because the HDMI standard does not allow for recording, other connectors will still be needed to link a video display to a VCR or a DVD recorder."
     
  8. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    hi barb!

    hdmi is a pretty new and unique feature. i would think if the gear featured it, it would be prominently stated.

    you can always ask the salesperson ... hopefully they'll know. or, check the manufacturer website - it should definitely be listed there.

    good luck, let us know if you have any other q's.

    [​IMG]
     

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