Finally moving out (a.k.a. taking the plunge)

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Brian Harnish, Sep 15, 2003.

  1. Brian Harnish

    Brian Harnish Screenwriter

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    I am seriously getting fed up with living at home (it brings about a serious lack of options when dealing with women and such...I can't exactly bring a date home with me to watch a movie (or play...hehehe... [​IMG] ) with 3 other people in the house all the time). Plus, it would be rather awkward saying "Hi Mom" as we went into my bedroom as that's the only place in this house with a decent home theater. [​IMG]

    So, I'm planning on finally moving out come January (that'll give me enough time to pay off my current credit card debt in full). What do I need to consider when moving out? I've counted up my expenses and have considered almost everything (I think). For those that took the plunge and left mommy and daddy (or in my case, mommy and grandparents), what other things should I consider other than the bare essentials?

    The bare essentials meaning:

    Car Insurance
    DSL (or cable)
    Food (and for hardcore beer enthusiasts, no this does not include beer as I don't drink very often [​IMG] )
    Gym Membership
    Recreational Expenses
    Utilities (unless the apartment complex already pays for some of them)
    Miscellaneous (for those that took the plunge, please tell me anything I may have forgotten above). Keep in mind that I pretty much don't need cable T.V. (I only watch films and listen to music for entertainment -- I find standard cable T.V. much too droll and uninteresting). The few shows I do enjoy don't warrant spending an extra $30-50/mo for cable.

    I plan on going a month or two without too much extra cash as I get a small business going. I can't do too much at home right now but as soon as I get out I'll finally have the best possible environment to think and concentrate: Quiet, quiet, and more quiet. Man, I simply can't wait. Also, another benefit for moving out: Girls girls girls, HERE I COME!! [​IMG]
     
  2. Carl Miller

    Carl Miller Screenwriter

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    If you don't already, I strongly recommend having a couple of months rent set aside as a safety net to cover rent in case something unexpected happens...like a big car bill.
     
  3. Carl Johnson

    Carl Johnson Cinematographer

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    Off the top of my head the essentials to moving out are:
    • rent
    • insurance (both auto and renters)
    • transportation (if you're driving a well used vehicle think ahead to what a car payment will do to your budget
    • food
    • electric
    • heat
    • water
    • phone (either cell or landline, no need to pay for both)
    • internet
     
  4. Mark Romero

    Mark Romero Second Unit

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    I never considered internet to be essential until I got it.
     
  5. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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    Errrr, furniture? Outfitting a new place is more expensive than you think.

    Unless you already have sufficient in your room which you're taking with you?
     
  6. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    find a roommate that already has their place outfitted?
    The bare essentials add up, you need house wares, cleaning supplies and a vacuum, plates, glasses, silverware, cooking utensils, a microwave, shower curtains, stuff you never think about. it adds up FAST.
     
  7. Scott Core

    Scott Core Auditioning

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    Make sure you really like the apartment/house before you sign the lease. Talk to your prospective neighbors and landlord about any problems (parking, trash pickup, pipes, heat or a/c) before you sign and what options you have available if they occur after you move in. A year lease is a long time if you find out you don't have any place to park your car(s) or if your neighbors do things like leave their trash in the common hall overnight before taking it out to the dumpster in the morning or the crazy guy that will jiggle your doorknob at two in the morning (my first apartment, man, let me tell ya...). Also, figure out how, when, and where you'll be able to do your laundry.

    I agree on the rent cushion. Two or three months rent in the bank is a pretty good idea should something happen.

    Good luck on finding a place.
     
  8. Brian W. Ralston

    Brian W. Ralston Supporting Actor

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    Especially in CA, don't forget about the expensive deposit most apartments/landlords require. Sometimes it is only equal to one month's rent....but I have seen it as high as 3 months rent (which in SoCal can be about $3000 up front). Make sure you find out about this when you look for a place and prepare for it in your savings these next few months.
     
  9. DonnyD

    DonnyD Screenwriter

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    If you chose to live in an apartment, typically they are not Home Theater compatible.....That would be a MAJOR consideration for me.....
     
  10. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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  11. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    oh another idea, are you in college? make friends that are, hang around in the spring when everyone moves out. free stuff galore!!
     
  12. Brian Harnish

    Brian Harnish Screenwriter

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    DonnyD wrote:
     
  13. mark alan

    mark alan Supporting Actor

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    the only way you won't have a down payment is if you find someone who is willing to do seller financing. You will not find that.

    A better option is to find an older home for rent and rent it. If you are not overly picky about location, you can usually find a house for less than the rental cost of an upscale apartment complex. Of course, you will then have yardwork and maintenance issues, driveby shootings, etc.
     
  14. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    There goes every spare dollar you may have left. :wink:
     
  15. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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  16. AllanN

    AllanN Supporting Actor

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    Extra transportation costs, if your moving farther that you where from school or work. This may come under groceries, but cleaning supplies, non food stuff.

     
  17. Pamela

    Pamela Supporting Actor

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    My suggestion is let friends, family and co-workers know that you are looking for a place, now. Putting it out on the grapevine can be a great way to find a something.

    I've been living in an apartment and wanted to move. Looking in papers and using an agnecy did not yield anything. I started telling everyone that I was looking and lo and behold, my good friends' good friends own a bunch of properties. They knew I was looking and when something was available, they let me know. Now, instead of living in an apartment, I will be living in a small house with, a garage, a yard and a huge patio—for the same price as I now pay for my dumpy apartment.

    Plus, since they already know me, they have gone the extra mile to get the property ready for me. New paint, carpet, and blinds, not to mention the plumbing and electrical work they had done to accomodate my needs.

    Either way, be patient and you will find something. good luck!
     
  18. Hunter P

    Hunter P Screenwriter

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    Very, very true. It's amazing how you can take these things for granted.

    Good luck on living on your own. Yeah, roommates are cheaper but there is nothing like having the place to yourself. All the food in the fridge is yours and you don't have to worry about somebody else eating it. You don't have to be quiet because somebody is sleeping in the next room. The hair in the shower is yours. And if there is a new stain, you know where it came from. [​IMG]
     
  19. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    Regarding budgeting: it is possible to live comfortably for about $14k a year, and without credit card debt. I did this for several years as a graduate student while living in upstate NY (which is a bit cheaper than CA).

    Some thoughts on it:
    - No student loans to pay
    - No new car payments
    - Get a roommate with furniture and live in cheap apartments, keeping rent and utilities under about $500 / mo.
    - Buy minimal furniture and do it over time (mooch off of roommates). Desks, bookhelves, etc. are done on the cheap.
    - Cook your own meals. Only eating out (includes lunches)about once per week.
    - Buying toys infrequently. For me this meant only getting a few (
     
  20. Justin Ward

    Justin Ward Supporting Actor

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