Finally have a turntable..how to care for my vinyl???

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Leroy, Dec 13, 2002.

  1. Leroy

    Leroy Second Unit

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    After about 13 years without a turntable, I finaly broke down and picked one up (a cheapie Audio-Technica). I have about 15 LP's that I've had since the early 80's (even an LP of my first junior high band concert, me and my bad trombone!!)

    My question is concerns cleaning and care of my LP's. They've been sitting for all these years but are in good to excellent shape (Iron Maiden -Live After Death sounded sweet).

    Are there any special methods for cleaning vinyl? What's the best way to store them, stacked or standing?

    Oh, and what should I look for as far as defects when buying LP's? I'm going on a vinyl shopping spree this weekend at a local Flea Market. Never realized how much I missed that sound.
     
  2. mike_decock

    mike_decock Supporting Actor

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    The best way to clean them is with a vacuum record cleaning machine and Disc Doctor brushes. I use a VPI HW16.5 and Disc Doctor fluid and it works wonders. As long as the record isn't scratched or groove damaged, it'll be pretty much noise-free.
    Granted, spending $600-$700 in record cleaning equipment doesn't make sense for a 15 record collection, you should have at least a good anti-static brush. If you want to go a little farther in really cleaning them (especially if you're picking up used records), an Allsop Orbitrac does a pretty good job and isn't outrageously expensive. Even better would be to get the Disc Doctor brushes and fluid, but it's a very labor intensive process.
    To preserve the records, pick up some nice poly or paper/poly sleeves (I get mine at sleevetown.com) and never put them back in the paper sleeves. Paper sleeves scuff up the record and they are dusty.
    Storage of records should always be standing. You never want to stack more than a few records on top of each other for any extended period of time. It's tough on the covers and if they aren't perfectly lined up, it can lead to warping.
    When shopping for used, you want to look for obvious defects first (deep scratches, fingerprints, etc). Also look at how shiny the surface is, you should see a rainbow effect on the surface when you hold it at a certain angle. Also look at the center hole. If it has lots of marks on the label from people poorly lining it up over the spindle, it's probably pretty worn out. No inner sleeve is also a bad sign.
    Most important of all... HAVE FUN. You may want to take a stroll over to the Vinyl Asylum. It's about the best resource in the world for vinyl enthusiasts. The FAQ has great tips for setting up a TT, shopping for and cleaning records. Searching the archives will also turn up a wealth of information.
    -Mike...
     
  3. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I'm perfectly happy with the old Discwasher D4 system for my old vinyl.
     
  4. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    i've also been pretty happy with my discwasher system.
    also, if you get find any vinyl with that tight fitting shrink-wrap stuff, take it off. over time that wrapping can shrink and actually bend the sleeve. get those vinyl outer sleeves that mike mentioned.
    also, i would never stack my albums - not even for a short period of time. i've always kept them as vertical as possible. i try not to even let them lean - as that can put pressure on one outermost "edge" of the row.
    of course, i haven't listened to them in ages as i don't have a turntable anymore. [​IMG]
     
  5. Fletch

    Fletch Agent

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    Unless they are dirty and smudged I wouldn t touch them with anything.I used different cleaners and such,but in the end,as long as you do not touch the grooves I reccommend leaving them be.I have records I bought back in 69 that sound as good as new and have never been cleaned.
     

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