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Film Reference Books (1 Viewer)

Taylor * D

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Hey gang, I searched multiple times but couldn't find anything so I hope there isn't a thread already.

If there's one thing I love most about HTF its the passion and knowledge of film. I'm always learning some new trivia from a favourite film or being introduced to a star I'm not familiar with. So my question is, what are some of the best books about film. This can be about the process of filmmaking itself or the history of a genre, informative biographies, etc. I have a bunch already that I've discovered over the years but I know there's a lot more out there. Among the titles I already have are A Star Is Born: The Making of the 1954 Movie and Its 1983 Restoration, Making Movies by Sidney Lumet, Hitchcock/Truffault, Easy Riders Raging Bulls, Memo from David O. Selznick, Lost Films by Frank Thompson, Conversations with the Great Moviemakers of Hollywood's Golden Age by George Stevens Jr., and my newest purchase M-G-M's Greatest Musicals by Hugh Fordin.

I know there's a lot more out there just waiting to be read.
 

Sam Favate

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Adventures in the Screen Trade by William Goldman is a classic.

I look forward to reading everyone’s suggestions.
 
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Angelo Colombus

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Here are some of my favorites:

1) United Artists, Volume 1 & 2 by Tino Balio
2) Lion of Hollywood, The Life and Legend of Louis B Mayer by Scott Eyman
3) RKO Radio Pictures, A Titan is Born by Richard B Jewell
4) Slow Fade To Black, The Decline of RKO Radio Pictures by Richard B Jewell
5) The Kid Stays in the Picture by Robert Evans
6) Orson Welles, Volumes 1,2,3 by Simon Callow
7) MGM, Hollywood's Greatest Backlot by Steven Bingen
8) Road-Show, The Fall of Film Musicals in the 1960's by Matthew Kennedy
 

TravisR

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Admittedly, my tastes run a little less classy so I can recommend some books on genre titles.

Any fan of the 30's and 40's Universal horror movies needs Universal Horrors: The Studio's Classic Films 1931 - 1946- Second Edition. It's easy to find info about the big movies like Dracula, Bride Of Frankenstein, or The Wolfman but if you're also interested in the lesser-known ones like Man-Made Monster, The Mad Doctor Of Market Street, or Captive Wild Woman, this book is essential. Maybe the best movie book I've ever read.

Ed Wood: Nightmare of Ecstasy was revolutionary at the time of its publication since it covered the "worst director of all time". Nowadays, every shitty director ever to live has a massive tome written about them but in the early 90's, it was not common.

Anyone who is a fan of Friday The 13th would enjoy Crystal Lake Memories: The Complete History of Friday The 13th. After the publication of this book, it was adapted into a 5 or 6-hour documentary and there's been tons of short documentaries and interviews on DVD and Blu-ray of the F13s but this was the first attempt of someone really looking at the behind the scenes stories of the entire F13 series.

And probably all Star Wars fans have heard or have read them but The Making Of Star Wars, The Making Of The Empire Strikes Back, and The Making Of Return Of The Jedi are three top-notch books and have heretofore unheard info in them (and given how well covered the Star Wars movies have been, that's pretty incredible).
 

Sam Favate

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And probably all Star Wars fans have heard or have read them but The Making Of Star Wars, The Making Of The Empire Strikes Back, and The Making Of Return Of The Jedi are three top-notch books and have heretofore unheard info in them (and given how well covered the Star Wars movies have been, that's pretty incredible).

I will second these three. Having lived with Star Wars for 44 years now, I thought I had read everything there was to read or knew everything there was to know. Then come J.W. Rinzler's books, which are outstanding. Rinzler is also the author of The Complete Making of Indiana Jones, The Making of the Planet of the Apes, The Making of Alien, and The Making of Aliens (<-- this is the only one I haven't read). All worthwhile.

There is also The Men Who Would Be King: An Almost Epic Tale of Moguls, Movies, and a Company Called DreamWorks
by Nicole LaPorte.
 

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