Figured out my equipment, what else?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brian E, Mar 1, 2002.

  1. Brian E

    Brian E Screenwriter

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    Thanks to people here I've got my new equipment coming. My next question is what else will I need to have/do when it gets here?



    I'll be getting an SPL Meter and calibration disc.



    I have some Monster Cables from my current setup and I'm thinking about using Acoustic Research cables for the rest. Are these ok? Coax or Optical audio hookup for my DVD player (Panasonic A310)?, the player has both. What should I look for in a cable for the sub?



    Anything else I should know or do when setting it up?



    The rears I'll be using for now are from my old system (Aiwa SX-NAV900 150W 6ohm 3-way). These speakers have small wires hardwired into them. To extend these wires do you suggest splicing into the wire that's there or opening the speaker and soldering all new wire to it?



    As always thanks for your input. My new equipment along with it's specs is listed below.











    [​IMG]
    Pioneer VSX-709S











    Processing:


    Dolby Digital & DTS Decoding


    24-bit DSP


    5 Channel Stereo


    Multi-Channel Tone Controls


    5.1 Acoustical Environment DSP


    5.1 Advanced Theater


    Midnight Mode


    Multi-Channel Digital NR


    24-bit A/D Converters


    6 Channels 96k / 24-bit D/A



    Power:


    Direct Energy MOSFET Amplifier Design


    Direct Current Construction


    Double Density Amplifier PCB


    Stereo: 100 Watts per Channel (1 kHz, @ 8 ohm, 0.09% THD)


    Surround: 100W x 5 (1 kHz, .09% THD)



    Convenience Features:


    5.1 Channel Input


    Dot Matrix Display


    Video Signal Select


    Smart


    Pre-Amp Output (ALL)


    4 Assignable Digital Inputs & 1 Out


    4 Audio & 5 Video Inputs


    S-Video Switching Banana Speaker Terminals (ALL)


    Front A/V Input w/S-Video In


    Direct Switch


    3 step FL Dimmer


    2 Rear Panel AC Accessory Outlets














    [​IMG]
    B&W LCR60 S3 Center Channel









    Description 2½-way vented-box system with magnetic shielding


    Frequency Response 70Hz - 22kHz ± 3dB on reference axis


    Frequency Range -6dB at 55Hz and 42kHz


    Sensitivity 88dB spl (2.83V 1m)


    Nominal Impedance 8 ohms (minimum 3 ohms)


    Power Handling 25W - 120W into 8 ohms on unclipped programme


    Drive Units 1x 25mm (1in) metal dome high-frequency

    1x 130mm (5½-in) woven Kevlar® cone bass/midrange

    1x 130mm (5½-in) woven Kevlar® cone bass


    Dispersion Within 2dB of response on reference axis

    Horizontal: over 20° arc

    Vertical: over 40° arc

    (Units horizontally in line)


    Harmonic distortion 2nd & 3rd harmonics

    less than 1% 70Hz - 20kHz (90dB spl, 1m)


    Max. recommended cable impedance 0.1 ohms


    Crossover frequencies 400Hz, 4kHz














    [​IMG]
    B&W DM600 S3 Fronts









    Description 2-way vented-box system


    Frequency Response 75Hz - 22kHz ± 3dB on reference axis


    Frequency Range -6dB at 55Hz and 42kHz


    Sensitivity 88dB spl (2.83V 1m)


    Nominal Impedance 8 ohms (minimum 3.0 ohms)


    Power Handling 25W - 100W into 8 ohms on unclipped programme


    Drive Units 1x 25mm (1in) metal dome high-frequency


    1x 130mm (5.0in) woven Kevlar® cone bass/midrange


    Dispersion Within 2dB of response on reference axis, Horizontal: over 40° arc, Vertical: over 10° arc


    Harmonic distortion 2nd & 3rd harmonics less than 1% 88Hz - 20kHz (90dB spl, 1m)


    Max. recommended cable impedance 0.1 ohms


    Crossover frequency 4kHz














    [​IMG]
    CSW BassCube 15









    Woofer Size 15"


    Amplifier Power 150 Watts


    Frequency Response 28 - 170HZ


    Variable Crossover 28 - 160HZ


    Level Control


    Phase Switch


    Line-Level Input


    Weight 73 LBS
     
  2. Brian E

    Brian E Screenwriter

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    Also, does anyone have an idea where I can get some cheap cool looking stands like these? I might try and make some.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. TedO

    TedO Stunt Coordinator

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    Check Ebay under speaker stands, many different ones to choose from.
     
  4. Jason Wilcox

    Jason Wilcox Supporting Actor

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    wow.....those speakers are beautiful

    ps: sorry for not adding anything to the conversation
     
  5. Brian E

    Brian E Screenwriter

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  6. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Brian, looks like you're ready to roll! I bet you dont need much advice at this point (you got more posts than me!}

    I tried to upgrade an Aiwa system for someone else: replaced skinny audio connects with RadioShack Gold and a new RS Video cable. I stopped at pulling the fixed spkr wires from the Aiwas--what are they, no more than 18gauge? Yes try a splice w/ at least 14 gauge.

    Banana plugs are good for connectors to the 600s and amp.

    AR Pro connects look pretty solid and are cheaper than Munster. You know the drill re DVD digital output cable: coax is sturdier and generally cheaper than Toslink optical; it's entirely optional.

    Many recommend using RG6 coax for subwoofer cable. RS has a 25-foot RG6 with F-connectors -- buy two F-to-RCA adapters. A more custom run can be made by a local hi-fi dealer who stocks RG6 in white -- get the precise length you want made for sub placement -- again with F-to-RCA adapters -- $9US!

    Video cabling: are you S-Video or Component? Do you want to run TV and/or TV thru the AVR? You'll need a corresponding cable for AVR Monitor Out to TV...
     
  7. Brian E

    Brian E Screenwriter

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  8. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Sure, if you've got the coax stripper/crimper/dies -- make your own subwoofer cable!
    Banana plugs? Take a look at these styles
    Some like the double plug with a plastic bridge for sturdier connection to speaker posts. On the amp end it depends if the inputs are spaced to accommodate a double.
    Coax vs optical? Neither is "better" when one is looking at passing a digital 1s and 0s signal. It's just that once optical cable is severely crimped by accident it can be ruined. (I'm ok so far).
    HD 12gauge speaker wire all around is quite sensible.
     
  9. Jason Wilcox

    Jason Wilcox Supporting Actor

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    technically, optical should sound better but most optical cable is made with plastic rather than glass (a glass optical cable usually costs well over $100). therefore, most people prefer the sound of coax (although the difference is not at all vast)

    as for banana plugs, i'd avoid AR brand plugs. they tend to fit a little too tight. monster or another comparable brand should do fine.
     
  10. Brian E

    Brian E Screenwriter

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  11. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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  12. Brian E

    Brian E Screenwriter

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    I'm saying the F connectors I've used in the past twisted onto the cable and were then held on by a screw on collar. I don't have a crimper or anything.
     
  13. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    (I love yer sig...it starts to hypnotize me and I forget what I'm doin')

    anyway, I dont mean to sound know-it-all. I dont know about twist-on F-connectors and hope someone else can comment. But RG6 is so cheap to buy ready-made that we dont have to quibble about a few bucks.

    Homebuilt line-level audio cables dont have to achieve "true" 75ohm to work. But some will pay $60 for the Belden Cable/Canare crimper and dies plus more bucks for the "certified" connectors. I dont go there because I dont need to build a lotta cables.
     
  14. Jacques C

    Jacques C Stunt Coordinator

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    Twist on F-connectors have the reputation of being more fragile than their crimp or solder on brothers. Other than that there is no difference.
     
  15. Brian E

    Brian E Screenwriter

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    I was just reading my manual for the new receiver and if I read it right it says to hook up both digital and analog cables to the DVD player. Is that right? I thought I'd only need a digital connection. Every diagram shows both being used. Below is a quote from the instructions.
    "In order to use Dolby Digital/DTS soundtracks which are at the heart of home theater you need to hook up your
    DVD player with digital audio connections. You can do this by either a coaxial or an optical connection, you don’t
    need to do both. The quality of these two types of connections is the same but since some digital components
    only have one type of digital terminal you need to figure out which yours has and hook it up to the appropriate
    terminal on the receiver. In order to do this you will need the proper cable. For coaxial connections you can use a
    regular RCA stereo cords or the specially-made coaxial cords, they have the same type of plugs. For optical
    connections you will need a special optical cord which you can buy at your local stereo store. Also hook up the
    video connection of your DVD player, the analog audio (for recording the audio on DVDs, use regular RCA stereo
    cords), and your TV (it's easiest to use a regular composite RCA video cords) as shown below. We also
    recommend hooking up your all your digital components to analog audio jacks. For this you can use regular RCA
    stereo cords."
    Thanks!
     
  16. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Can you imagine the rat's nest of wires!!!

    I'm with you, starting out with the DVD, just use one of the digital outputs. At this point I don't understand Pioneer's instruction about also using analog RCAs UNLESS the DVDP supports DVD-Audio in which case one connects 6 cables to the receiver's 5.1 or 6.1 pass-thru inputs set aside for this purpose.

    Altho the instruction doesnt specify DVD it seems generic, doesnt it? Just take it a step at a time.

    It's about time for your threads to get out of Basics and into Receivers or AV Sources.
     

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