Few Questions from a "Newb"

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Ryan Abbath, Jul 12, 2005.

  1. Ryan Abbath

    Ryan Abbath Auditioning

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    Well this weekend I had a sudden urge to go out and buy a TV. In my price range the Toshiba 30" 30HF85 Widescreen HDTV. Now my DVD player is pretty outdated, it's an old toshiba dual tray player that's treated me pretty good. It's not progressive scan but it got the job done for my old tv. When I hooked it up to my regular video input on the tv the picture just looked like crap. So I tried using the same A/V cables and hooked it up to the Colorstream component with the dvd player and it looks pretty nice. Now my first questions...

    If I buy better component video cables will my picture improve alot or should I just stick with the A/V cables that seem to be getting the job done? But I'm going to upgrade to a HD dvd player in a couple weeks so should I just wait for that and buy an HD plug.

    Ok now I have regular cable (not digital) and man when I watch tv it looks like crap. I get fuzz, it's pixelated, and there's all these little white horizontal lines that pop up in random places on some stations. I figure this is normal since I'm not using HD or digital cable.

    Just some input on this would be great, I'm new to all this and I've been trying to look this up the past couple days and I'm not getting anywhere.
     
  2. EricRWem

    EricRWem Screenwriter

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  3. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Hard to say whether you will see improvement with better cables, but most likely you will. You will have to buy and try, or do you live near stores with return privileges, or do you have friends with upscale equipment from whom you could borrow cables, etc.?

    If per chance the red and white cables are made of the same material (video grade) as the yellow cable for manufacturing simplicity, the cables are probably not degrading the video signal as you have it. Usually the red and white cables are of lesser quality material. For a real component video cable set with red, green, and blue cables you are probably getting the maximum quality.

    It is also possible that for an inexpensive TV the electronics inside may not preserve the difference that excvellent cables could send to the TV.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     

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