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Favorite Old School 70mm Cinemas (1 Viewer)

Bobby Henderson

Stunt Coordinator
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Messages
143
In terms of 70mm movie-going I was in hog heaven when I lived in New York City 30 years ago (mid 80's into early 90's). Manhattan alone had dozens of screens equipped to show 70mm. At least a dozen of those venues played movies in 70mm on a frequent basis. Some really big releases placed 70mm prints in Brooklyn, Queens, out on Long Island, in New Jersey and even Staten Island on some occasions.

The Ziegfeld was my favorite place to watch movies, many of which were in 70mm there. The Loews Astor Plaza was also great. It was built underground and had an even higher seat count than the Ziegfeld (around 1500 IIRC). The Gemini Twin and Cinema One got a lot of shows in 70mm. I watched a few shows at the Gramercy Theater on 23rd Street; it was close to my college. I saw "The Untouchables" in 70mm at the Loews New York Twin. I saw a few shows at the 34th Street Showplace, such as "Black Rain" in 70mm and an early 35mm Dolby SR release: "Robocop."

When I left NYC I figured that was it for 70mm movie-going. But I ended being able to see a few good shows in Dallas. The General Cinemas Northpark 1-2 was my favorite theater there. I was hooked on my first visit ("Jurassic Park" in 35mm DTS). I did see a few 70mm shows at the UA Plaza theater nearby (it had four out of eight auditoriums equipped with 70mm). In terms of sound quality for theaters in that era, I was blown away by the sound quality at the GCC Northpark 1-2 in Dallas. The #1 screen was a real THX house. Not only that, but it was one of the original half dozen or so screens in LA and Dallas that Tomlinson Holman worked on in advance of the release of "Return of the Jedi" and debut of THX. The crew at the Northpark 1-2 would re-tune the sound system for every movie that played there. Compare that to most theaters not getting sound systems re-tuned at all. Anyway, "Titanic" in 70mm DTS on the Northpark #1 screen was pretty incredible. It's a real shame that theater got demolished. I think LOOK Cinemas in Dallas was the last place in the DFW metroplex showing movies in 5/70mm; the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic helped put that theater out of business.

Out of theatrical venues in operation today, there's nothing within driving distance to me that's open to the public that I find truly impressive. I wasn't very impressed with where I watched "The Hateful Eight" in 70mm: an AMC 24-plex in Oklahoma City. They had the BL&S UP70 setup installed in a mid-sized house with a HDTV-shaped common width screen. At least the screen had vertical masking. It seems all the IMAX 15/70 equipped houses are pretty much removing 70mm capabilities in addition to the 5/70mm places that have all but vanished.
 

bujaki

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5,546
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Jose Ortiz-Marrero
In terms of 70mm movie-going I was in hog heaven when I lived in New York City 30 years ago (mid 80's into early 90's). Manhattan alone had dozens of screens equipped to show 70mm. At least a dozen of those venues played movies in 70mm on a frequent basis. Some really big releases placed 70mm prints in Brooklyn, Queens, out on Long Island, in New Jersey and even Staten Island on some occasions.

The Ziegfeld was my favorite place to watch movies, many of which were in 70mm there. The Loews Astor Plaza was also great. It was built underground and had an even higher seat count than the Ziegfeld (around 1500 IIRC). The Gemini Twin and Cinema One got a lot of shows in 70mm. I watched a few shows at the Gramercy Theater on 23rd Street; it was close to my college. I saw "The Untouchables" in 70mm at the Loews New York Twin. I saw a few shows at the 34th Street Showplace, such as "Black Rain" in 70mm and an early 35mm Dolby SR release: "Robocop."

When I left NYC I figured that was it for 70mm movie-going. But I ended being able to see a few good shows in Dallas. The General Cinemas Northpark 1-2 was my favorite theater there. I was hooked on my first visit ("Jurassic Park" in 35mm DTS). I did see a few 70mm shows at the UA Plaza theater nearby (it had four out of eight auditoriums equipped with 70mm). In terms of sound quality for theaters in that era, I was blown away by the sound quality at the GCC Northpark 1-2 in Dallas. The #1 screen was a real THX house. Not only that, but it was one of the original half dozen or so screens in LA and Dallas that Tomlinson Holman worked on in advance of the release of "Return of the Jedi" and debut of THX. The crew at the Northpark 1-2 would re-tune the sound system for every movie that played there. Compare that to most theaters not getting sound systems re-tuned at all. Anyway, "Titanic" in 70mm DTS on the Northpark #1 screen was pretty incredible. It's a real shame that theater got demolished. I think LOOK Cinemas in Dallas was the last place in the DFW metroplex showing movies in 5/70mm; the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic helped put that theater out of business.

Out of theatrical venues in operation today, there's nothing within driving distance to me that's open to the public that I find truly impressive. I wasn't very impressed with where I watched "The Hateful Eight" in 70mm: an AMC 24-plex in Oklahoma City. They had the BL&S UP70 setup installed in a mid-sized house with a HDTV-shaped common width screen. At least the screen had vertical masking. It seems all the IMAX 15/70 equipped houses are pretty much removing 70mm capabilities in addition to the 5/70mm places that have all but vanished.
I lived in NYC from late '71 to mid-'88, when I moved to Dallas, so I recognize all the venues you describe above. It's a shame they're all gone. Unforgettable viewing experiences.
 

cinemel1

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Mel Matsil
I’ve always lived in the NY area and saw most of the films released in their original roadshow runs:
Oklahoma! - Rivoli (1956)
Around the World in 80 Days - Rivoli (1956)
South Pacific - Criterion (1958)
Porgy & Bess - Warner (1959)
Ben-Hur - Loew’s State (1960)
Can-Can (1960) Rivoli
Spartacus - DeMille (1960)
The Alamo - Rivoli (1960)
West Side Story - Rivoli (1961)
El Cid - Warner (1961)
Barrabbas - DeMille (1962)
Lawrence of Arabia - Criterion (1962)
Mutiny on the Bounty - Loew’s State (1963)
Cleopatra - Rivoli (1963) 4 hour verion
It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World - Warner (1964)
Circus World - Loew’s Cinerama (1964)
My Fair Lady - Sheridan Theatre Miami Beach (1965)
The Sound of Msick- Syosset Theatre (1965)
The Greatest Story Ever Told - Warner (1965)
Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines -Pine Hollow (1965)
Doctor Zhivago - Loew’s Cinerama (1965)
The Agony & the Ecstasy - Sheridan Miami Beach (1966)
Battle of the Bulge - Warner Cinerama (1966)
The Bible - Loew’s State (1966)
Grand Prix - Warner Cinerama (1967)
The Sand Pebbles - Rivoli (1967)
Far From The Madding Crowd - Loew‘s Capitol (1967)
Gone with the Wind (70mm blow-up - Academy Ratio cropped) - Rivoli
Camelot - Warner (1967)
Doctor Dolittle - Loew’s State (1968)
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
War & Peace - Russian Version - DeMille (1968)
Star! - Rivoli (1968)
Ben-Hur - Plainview (1996)
Hello Dolly -Rivoli - (1970)
Ryan’s Daughter - Ziegfeld (1970)
That’s Entertainment Part II - Ziegfeld (1976)
Return of a Man Called Horse - Ziegfeld (1976)
Star Wars - Hicksville Theatre - (1977)
Close Encounters of the 3rdKind - Ziegfeld (1977)
The Deer Hunter - Cinema 1 (1979)
Alien - Syosset (1979)
Apocalypse Now - Ziegfeld Theatre - Premiere (1979)
The Empire Strikes Back - RKO Twin (1980)
Altered States - Ziegfeld (1980)
Raiders of The Lost Ark - Sunrise Multplex (1981)
Quest for Fire - Sunrise Multiplex (1982)
Star Trek II; Wrath of Khan - Sunrise Multiplex (1982)
Gandhi - Green Acres Theatre (1983)
Return of the Jedi - RKO Twin (1983)
Brainstorm - Ziegfeld (1983)
The Right Stuff - Sunrise Multiplex (1983)
Indiana Jones & the Temple of Doom - Sunrise (1984)
Star Trek III: Search for Spock - Sunrise (1984)
Dune -?- (1984)
Cocoon -?- (1985)
The Black Cauldron - Sunrise (1985)
Aliens - Sunrise (1986)
The Mission - Sunrise (1986)

After this I stopped keeping track of the 70mm presentations.
Some of the films listed above may have been blow-ups.
The best Manhattan theatres for 70mm were the Rivoli, Criterion, Loew’s State, Warner Cinerama, Loew’s Cinerama (formerly the Capitol Theatre), Ziegfeld, DeMille.
The Sheridan in Miami Beach was a fine venue. The Syosset & Cinema 150 theatres on
Long Island were excellent. The local theatres (RKO Twin, Sunrise Multiplex, etc.)were passable. Nothing compared to the Manhattan venues.
When Lucas released the special editions of the first 3 Star Wars films they showed them at the Cinema 150 in Syosset which had a giant curved screen with an excellent sound system. I also saw 2001 there the week before its first broadcast on pan and scan tv, a travesty of course. I went there after work one day and was the only one in the theater. The projectionist invited me into the projection booth on the ground floor right behind the candy counter. He showed me how everything worked. Seeing the giant 70mm film itself was a treat.

Unfortunately those days are gone. Theatres have lost quality of showmanship.
I’m glad I was there in the days when viewing a film was an event.
 

SixOfTheRichest

Stunt Coordinator
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Messages
83
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Daz
I’ve always lived in the NY area and saw most of the films released in their original roadshow runs:
Oklahoma! - Rivoli (1956)
Around the World in 80 Days - Rivoli (1956)
South Pacific - Criterion (1958)
Porgy & Bess - Warner (1959)
Ben-Hur - Loew’s State (1960)
Can-Can (1960) Rivoli
Spartacus - DeMille (1960)
The Alamo - Rivoli (1960)
West Side Story - Rivoli (1961)
El Cid - Warner (1961)
Barrabbas - DeMille (1962)
Lawrence of Arabia - Criterion (1962)
Mutiny on the Bounty - Loew’s State (1963)
Cleopatra - Rivoli (1963) 4 hour verion
It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World - Warner (1964)
Circus World - Loew’s Cinerama (1964)
My Fair Lady - Sheridan Theatre Miami Beach (1965)
The Sound of Msick- Syosset Theatre (1965)
The Greatest Story Ever Told - Warner (1965)
Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines -Pine Hollow (1965)
Doctor Zhivago - Loew’s Cinerama (1965)
The Agony & the Ecstasy - Sheridan Miami Beach (1966)
Battle of the Bulge - Warner Cinerama (1966)
The Bible - Loew’s State (1966)
Grand Prix - Warner Cinerama (1967)
The Sand Pebbles - Rivoli (1967)
Far From The Madding Crowd - Loew‘s Capitol (1967)
Gone with the Wind (70mm blow-up - Academy Ratio cropped) - Rivoli
Camelot - Warner (1967)
Doctor Dolittle - Loew’s State (1968)
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
War & Peace - Russian Version - DeMille (1968)
Star! - Rivoli (1968)
Ben-Hur - Plainview (1996)
Hello Dolly -Rivoli - (1970)
Ryan’s Daughter - Ziegfeld (1970)
That’s Entertainment Part II - Ziegfeld (1976)
Return of a Man Called Horse - Ziegfeld (1976)
Star Wars - Hicksville Theatre - (1977)
Close Encounters of the 3rdKind - Ziegfeld (1977)
The Deer Hunter - Cinema 1 (1979)
Alien - Syosset (1979)
Apocalypse Now - Ziegfeld Theatre - Premiere (1979)
The Empire Strikes Back - RKO Twin (1980)
Altered States - Ziegfeld (1980)
Raiders of The Lost Ark - Sunrise Multplex (1981)
Quest for Fire - Sunrise Multiplex (1982)
Star Trek II; Wrath of Khan - Sunrise Multiplex (1982)
Gandhi - Green Acres Theatre (1983)
Return of the Jedi - RKO Twin (1983)
Brainstorm - Ziegfeld (1983)
The Right Stuff - Sunrise Multiplex (1983)
Indiana Jones & the Temple of Doom - Sunrise (1984)
Star Trek III: Search for Spock - Sunrise (1984)
Dune -?- (1984)
Cocoon -?- (1985)
The Black Cauldron - Sunrise (1985)
Aliens - Sunrise (1986)
The Mission - Sunrise (1986)

After this I stopped keeping track of the 70mm presentations.
Some of the films listed above may have been blow-ups.
The best Manhattan theatres for 70mm were the Rivoli, Criterion, Loew’s State, Warner Cinerama, Loew’s Cinerama (formerly the Capitol Theatre), Ziegfeld, DeMille.
The Sheridan in Miami Beach was a fine venue. The Syosset & Cinema 150 theatres on
Long Island were excellent. The local theatres (RKO Twin, Sunrise Multiplex, etc.)were passable. Nothing compared to the Manhattan venues.
When Lucas released the special editions of the first 3 Star Wars films they showed them at the Cinema 150 in Syosset which had a giant curved screen with an excellent sound system. I also saw 2001 there the week before its first broadcast on pan and scan tv, a travesty of course. I went there after work one day and was the only one in the theater. The projectionist invited me into the projection booth on the ground floor right behind the candy counter. He showed me how everything worked. Seeing the giant 70mm film itself was a treat.

Unfortunately those days are gone. Theatres have lost quality of showmanship.
I’m glad I was there in the days when viewing a film was an event.
I hear ya! Even today, with the clean cut digital presentations on giant screens and Dolby Atmos Sound, something has still been lost. Thing is though, it could also be the films themselves. I would rather watch any of those films you listed you saw in 70mm, than say the latest Nolan blockbuster, or any newer blockbuster type of film, that has no soul. All cut and paste.
 

SixOfTheRichest

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
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Messages
83
Real Name
Daz
In terms of 70mm movie-going I was in hog heaven when I lived in New York City 30 years ago (mid 80's into early 90's). Manhattan alone had dozens of screens equipped to show 70mm. At least a dozen of those venues played movies in 70mm on a frequent basis. Some really big releases placed 70mm prints in Brooklyn, Queens, out on Long Island, in New Jersey and even Staten Island on some occasions.

The Ziegfeld was my favorite place to watch movies, many of which were in 70mm there. The Loews Astor Plaza was also great. It was built underground and had an even higher seat count than the Ziegfeld (around 1500 IIRC). The Gemini Twin and Cinema One got a lot of shows in 70mm. I watched a few shows at the Gramercy Theater on 23rd Street; it was close to my college. I saw "The Untouchables" in 70mm at the Loews New York Twin. I saw a few shows at the 34th Street Showplace, such as "Black Rain" in 70mm and an early 35mm Dolby SR release: "Robocop."

When I left NYC I figured that was it for 70mm movie-going. But I ended being able to see a few good shows in Dallas. The General Cinemas Northpark 1-2 was my favorite theater there. I was hooked on my first visit ("Jurassic Park" in 35mm DTS). I did see a few 70mm shows at the UA Plaza theater nearby (it had four out of eight auditoriums equipped with 70mm). In terms of sound quality for theaters in that era, I was blown away by the sound quality at the GCC Northpark 1-2 in Dallas. The #1 screen was a real THX house. Not only that, but it was one of the original half dozen or so screens in LA and Dallas that Tomlinson Holman worked on in advance of the release of "Return of the Jedi" and debut of THX. The crew at the Northpark 1-2 would re-tune the sound system for every movie that played there. Compare that to most theaters not getting sound systems re-tuned at all. Anyway, "Titanic" in 70mm DTS on the Northpark #1 screen was pretty incredible. It's a real shame that theater got demolished. I think LOOK Cinemas in Dallas was the last place in the DFW metroplex showing movies in 5/70mm; the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic helped put that theater out of business.

Out of theatrical venues in operation today, there's nothing within driving distance to me that's open to the public that I find truly impressive. I wasn't very impressed with where I watched "The Hateful Eight" in 70mm: an AMC 24-plex in Oklahoma City. They had the BL&S UP70 setup installed in a mid-sized house with a HDTV-shaped common width screen. At least the screen had vertical masking. It seems all the IMAX 15/70 equipped houses are pretty much removing 70mm capabilities in addition to the 5/70mm places that have all but vanished.
NY sounds like it would have been cinematic heaven for me in the 70's and 80's. I am grateful though for the several I did get to see during my time living in NZ. Of the handful of 80's films I got to see in 70mm, 2010 was the best, even if at 4 screen multiplex that replaced Aucklands awesome Cinerama cineama. The screen was moderate size, (I'd say about 17mtrs width), but they did utilize the top masking for 2:20 ratio. For some reason they didn't for The Untouchables though. Plus the benefit was the 6 Track Dolby; blow ups, spherical ratio or not.
 

cinemiracle

Screenwriter
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Messages
1,379
Real Name
Peter
I’ve always lived in the NY area and saw most of the films released in their original roadshow runs:
Oklahoma! - Rivoli (1956)
Around the World in 80 Days - Rivoli (1956)
South Pacific - Criterion (1958)
Porgy & Bess - Warner (1959)
Ben-Hur - Loew’s State (1960)
Can-Can (1960) Rivoli
Spartacus - DeMille (1960)
The Alamo - Rivoli (1960)
West Side Story - Rivoli (1961)
El Cid - Warner (1961)
Barrabbas - DeMille (1962)
Lawrence of Arabia - Criterion (1962)
Mutiny on the Bounty - Loew’s State (1963)
Cleopatra - Rivoli (1963) 4 hour verion
It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World - Warner (1964)
Circus World - Loew’s Cinerama (1964)
My Fair Lady - Sheridan Theatre Miami Beach (1965)
The Sound of Msick- Syosset Theatre (1965)
The Greatest Story Ever Told - Warner (1965)
Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines -Pine Hollow (1965)
Doctor Zhivago - Loew’s Cinerama (1965)
The Agony & the Ecstasy - Sheridan Miami Beach (1966)
Battle of the Bulge - Warner Cinerama (1966)
The Bible - Loew’s State (1966)
Grand Prix - Warner Cinerama (1967)
The Sand Pebbles - Rivoli (1967)
Far From The Madding Crowd - Loew‘s Capitol (1967)
Gone with the Wind (70mm blow-up - Academy Ratio cropped) - Rivoli
Camelot - Warner (1967)
Doctor Dolittle - Loew’s State (1968)
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
War & Peace - Russian Version - DeMille (1968)
Star! - Rivoli (1968)
Ben-Hur - Plainview (1996)
Hello Dolly -Rivoli - (1970)
Ryan’s Daughter - Ziegfeld (1970)
That’s Entertainment Part II - Ziegfeld (1976)
Return of a Man Called Horse - Ziegfeld (1976)
Star Wars - Hicksville Theatre - (1977)
Close Encounters of the 3rdKind - Ziegfeld (1977)
The Deer Hunter - Cinema 1 (1979)
Alien - Syosset (1979)
Apocalypse Now - Ziegfeld Theatre - Premiere (1979)
The Empire Strikes Back - RKO Twin (1980)
Altered States - Ziegfeld (1980)
Raiders of The Lost Ark - Sunrise Multplex (1981)
Quest for Fire - Sunrise Multiplex (1982)
Star Trek II; Wrath of Khan - Sunrise Multiplex (1982)
Gandhi - Green Acres Theatre (1983)
Return of the Jedi - RKO Twin (1983)
Brainstorm - Ziegfeld (1983)
The Right Stuff - Sunrise Multiplex (1983)
Indiana Jones & the Temple of Doom - Sunrise (1984)
Star Trek III: Search for Spock - Sunrise (1984)
Dune -?- (1984)
Cocoon -?- (1985)
The Black Cauldron - Sunrise (1985)
Aliens - Sunrise (1986)
The Mission - Sunrise (1986)

After this I stopped keeping track of the 70mm presentations.
Some of the films listed above may have been blow-ups.
The best Manhattan theatres for 70mm were the Rivoli, Criterion, Loew’s State, Warner Cinerama, Loew’s Cinerama (formerly the Capitol Theatre), Ziegfeld, DeMille.
The Sheridan in Miami Beach was a fine venue. The Syosset & Cinema 150 theatres on
Long Island were excellent. The local theatres (RKO Twin, Sunrise Multiplex, etc.)were passable. Nothing compared to the Manhattan venues.
When Lucas released the special editions of the first 3 Star Wars films they showed them at the Cinema 150 in Syosset which had a giant curved screen with an excellent sound system. I also saw 2001 there the week before its first broadcast on pan and scan tv, a travesty of course. I went there after work one day and was the only one in the theater. The projectionist invited me into the projection booth on the ground floor right behind the candy counter. He showed me how everything worked. Seeing the giant 70mm film itself was a treat.

Unfortunately those days are gone. Theatres have lost quality of showmanship.
I’m glad I was there in the days when viewing a film was an event.

A pity that you missed HEAVEN"S GATE in 70mm-the uncut roadshow version as it only screened for a week in NYC .It was never shown anywhere else in the world in this uncut version. Luckily I saw it.
 

Bobby Henderson

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
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Messages
143
IIRC the original, and very abbreviated, public release of "Heaven's Gate" played in 70mm at Cinema One. I don't think it even lasted a full week after that blistering NY Times review. I think only four or five days later the print of "Heaven's Gate" was pulled and replaced with a print of "Apocalypse Now."

cinemel1 said:
The best Manhattan theatres for 70mm were the Rivoli, Criterion, Loew’s State, Warner Cinerama, Loew’s Cinerama (formerly the Capitol Theatre), Ziegfeld, DeMille.

I think some of those theaters were gone by the 1980's. I remember visiting the Criterion Theater in Times Square a few times. "Total Recall" and "Alien Nation" are a couple shows I recall seeing in 70mm there. I wasn't all that impressed with it; the place seemed a bit run-down. The National Twin seemed bigger and nicer, although I seem to remember these big round columns on the left and right ends of the screen that did a good job of reflecting light back onto the screen.
 
Last edited:

cinemiracle

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IIRC the original, and very abbreviated, public release of "Heaven's Gate" played in 70mm at Cinema One. I don't think it even lasted a full week after that blistering NY Times review. I think only four or five days later the print of "Heaven's Gate" was pulled and replaced with a print of "Apocalypse Now."



I think some of those theaters were gone by the 1980's. I remember visiting the Criterion Theater in Times Square a few times. "Total Recall" and "Alien Nation" are a couple shows I recall seeing in 70mm there. I wasn't all that impressed with it; the place seemed a bit run-down. The National Twin seemed bigger and nicer, although I seem to remember these big round columns on the left and right ends of the screen that did a good job of reflecting light back onto the screen.
I never knew that ALIEN NATION was shown in 70mm
 

jayembee

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I never knew that ALIEN NATION was shown in 70mm
I didn't, either, but in checking IMDb (salt to taste), in the "Technical Specifications" page for the film:


Negative Format 35 mm (Fuji)
Cinematographic Process Super 35
Printed Film Format 35 mm (anamorphic)
70 mm (blow-up)
 

Bobby Henderson

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Yep. "Alien Nation" definitely had a 70mm print at the Criterion. I can't remember if it was the only 70mm show in Manhattan. It's kind of tough to dig up NY area newspaper ad images from 30+ years ago.
 

SixOfTheRichest

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Daz
A pity that you missed HEAVEN"S GATE in 70mm-the uncut roadshow version as it only screened for a week in NYC .It was never shown anywhere else in the world in this uncut version. Luckily I saw it.
Despite all the backlash and notoriety this film received, how was it? It has never really appealed to me, but if I had a chance to see it in 70mm I likely would have gone.
 

SixOfTheRichest

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Daz
Yep. "Alien Nation" definitely had a 70mm print at the Criterion. I can't remember if it was the only 70mm show in Manhattan. It's kind of tough to dig up NY area newspaper ad images from 30+ years ago.
I haven't seen AN for yonks. I don't recall being overly impressed with the story, but I liked the visual look of it. It would have looked pretty good in 70mm I would say.
 

RichMurphy

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Yep. "Alien Nation" definitely had a 70mm print at the Criterion. I can't remember if it was the only 70mm show in Manhattan. It's kind of tough to dig up NY area newspaper ad images from 30+ years ago.
Actually, it's not too tough, thanks to the New York Times' "Time Machine" feature. And it looks like the Criterion had the only 70mm print in the area.

Criterion 70mm.png
 

RichMurphy

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Off-topic I know, but searching those archives can be addictive .... here's an example from 1916, when large big-city movie theatres had symphony orchestras. As you can see, movie hype is nothing new.

Intolerance.jpg
 

Bobby Henderson

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Actually, it's not too tough, thanks to the New York Times' "Time Machine" feature.

How do you access those images? Is that with a New York Times online subscription? If so, how good (or high in resolution) is the image quality?

BTW, I vaguely remember that 2 page spread. For some reason it reminds me of Edward Hopper's classic diner illustration, "Nighthawks." There was a decent number of movies that had huge, 2 page ads in the Friday edition of the New York Times.
 

cinemiracle

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Despite all the backlash and notoriety this film received, how was it? It has never really appealed to me, but if I had a chance to see it in 70mm I likely would have gone.
Hardly anybody in the audience on it's opening day matinee. Heard one patron ask another- 'did you read the NY Times review.?' I found the film to be very tedious and overlong. The cinematography was however, excellent. Watched the stars arrive the night before for it's World Premiere. As it was in 70mm, I just had to see it. Watched it again many years later on dvd but my opinion of the film never changed. I still have the full page ad from the NY times on the day that the film opened. The studio only let it play for a week in order to honor advance bookings before sending it to be re-edited before it's Los Angeles opening a few months later in a shortened 70mm version.
 

SixOfTheRichest

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Hardly anybody in the audience on it's opening day matinee. Heard one patron ask another- 'did you read the NY Times review.?' I found the film to be very tedious and overlong. The cinematography was however, excellent. Watched the stars arrive the night before for it's World Premiere. As it was in 70mm, I just had to see it. Watched it again many years later on dvd but my opinion of the film never changed. I still have the full page ad from the NY times on the day that the film opened. The studio only let it play for a week in order to honor advance bookings before sending it to be re-edited before it's Los Angeles opening a few months later in a shortened 70mm version.
I believe the shortened version has plenty of editing issues, but it would have made it a tighter film and still 2.5hrs. I would rather see the short version in 70mm if I had a choice.

The film making process was pure absolute self-indulgence and the hype surrounding Cimino got way out of control. I love The Deer Hunter, but the theme of that film was relevant and interesting to audiences and western set films usually have a limited appeal as well. It wasn't what audiences wanted to see at the time. UA only have themselves to blame and Cimino thinking he was so self-important. He was an excellent director, just poor choice of material.

He released The Deer Hunter in 70mm letterbox to retain the scope image.
 

RichMurphy

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How do you access those images? Is that with a New York Times online subscription? If so, how good (or high in resolution) is the image quality?

BTW, I vaguely remember that 2 page spread. For some reason it reminds me of Edward Hopper's classic diner illustration, "Nighthawks." There was a decent number of movies that had huge, 2 page ads in the Friday edition of the New York Times.
I checked, and apparently you need either home delivery (which I have on weekends) or a digital subscription. As for the image quality, it varies. I found it interesting that of my two clips above, the 1916 one looked better than the 1988 clip.
 

Bobby Henderson

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Jul 28, 2001
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143
A long time ago when I lived in Albany, GA one of the local libraries there had a very good NY Times microfilms collection that dated clear back to the 1800's. The image quality was pretty decent. It was possible to make prints of pages; the print output was similar to that of a photocopier. They also had microfilms from the LA Times, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Chicago Tribune and I think one or two other papers. The local library where I live now doesn't have any of that kind of stuff.
 

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