Faq?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by John_Q*, Jun 29, 2003.

  1. John_Q*

    John_Q* Extra

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    Hi,
    I was just wondering if there was any sort of FAQ or newbies guide to this forum? I've got a few $k to spend on a new TV, but I'm finding all the different model numbers, TV types, connectors, formats, etc to be overwhelming. (Who knew there was this much to buying a TV?? :b)

    I've gotten a lot of good mileage out of the other forums around here (DVD, speakers/receiver), but now it's time for the TV upgrade and I don't know what to do!

    Thanks,
    John
     
  2. adamKI

    adamKI Stunt Coordinator

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    This thread is a good place to get started. Have fun finding yournew TV!
     
  3. Sam Pat

    Sam Pat Stunt Coordinator

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    John,

    There isn't exactly a specific "Buying a new TV - all comprehensive, everything you need to know here" sort of guide archived. [​IMG]

    But the best thing to do (and what I did) is go shopping. Look for models that interest you (and are within your budget) and find as many other models that interest you as possible from as many shops as you can manage.

    Then type in all the specific models into the search function, and do some research!

    If you don't find everything you need, then that'll be a great time to ask for advice/experiences/words of wisdom.

    Just make sure you're a tad more specific.

    ie. Instead of "What TV should I get?"
    ask something like, "Is TV A better than TV B? Who has A or B and any comments?"

    I don't know how much or how little you know, you did ask about TV types... lets get more detailed questions!

    Best of luck, buddy! And have fun in your hunt.
     
  4. John-Miles

    John-Miles Screenwriter

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    most importantly before you go looking decide what you want, do you want a projector? RPTV, HD or analog, direct view maybe? or perhaps plasma? the list goes on, but you also want to decide on a price range and aspect ratio. before you decide on an aspect ration you really need to seriously consider how much of each thing you watch and will watch, ie video games, dvd, HD braodcasts, once you have that worked out it will be easier to decide many of these things.

    Good Luck
     
  5. John_Q*

    John_Q* Extra

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    Thanks for the tips guys.

    Here's what I'm thinking: definitely 16x9. No projectors (renting the place). My TV room is fairly large (up to 16' viewing distance), so I'm hoping to come up with 40+ inches. I'm trying to keep the weight reasonable (none of these 200 pound monstrosities).

    I've just gotten a progressive scan DVD player. HDTV and digital cable are a year or two away still.

    My budget is odd. I've got 1-4k to spend right now, BUT if there is a convincing reason to spend something like 5-7k (like plasma), I would be willing to do it.

    Basically, I'm lost on these points: Should I worry about all these different resolutions? How about all the different connectors I hear about? Do you need a special sort of output from the receiver in order to take advantage of the fancy features (like how you need optical/coax to use digital sound) - or does plain old s-video do the trick?
     
  6. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    With up to 16' viewing distance, you could have the largest 65" or greater RPTV with room to spare. Optimal viewing distance will vary with source (NTSC vs. DVD vs. HDTV) but you are no where near optimal for even VHS at 16'. Unfortunatly, a 65" RPTV set will weigh more (probably more than 200lbs.), but certainly not as much as a HD tube.

    Resolutions - you may worry about no 720p support if you intend to receive OTA (over the air) HDTV. If you are going to use satellite or cable to get HDTV, most boxes will rescale 720p to 1080i. Still, if a set displays native 720p or upscales it, it is another thing you do not have to worry about.

    DVI is a concern if you intend to record HDTV. Also, there are new DVD players coming out that will upscale a DVD to HDTV through the DVI port. Most cable based HDTV boxes are not arriving with the DVI ports operative, though, so this is not a hindrance to receiving HDTV. Still, DVI is becoming more common on HDTV's and you may find one with DVI in your price range easily.

    To get the best progressive scan picture from your DVD, most TV's require your to use the component connection. It is not necessary to route this through the A/V receiver if your receiver does not have component switching, just go directly from the DVD to the TV. HDTV also requires component (or DVI, see above) input. You'll probably not use the s-video inputs on your TV unless it is to watch non-HDTV cable or satellite.

    My personal preference is Toshiba HDTV's. Good price, great picture out of the box (hardly any red push), outstanding picture with a few tweaks. They do upscale all 480 input to 540p, but I'll be damned if I can see the difference. YMMV.
     
  7. Jed M

    Jed M Cinematographer

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  8. John_Q*

    John_Q* Extra

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    Again, thanks for the responses.

    Based on the info given, I've done a little research. RP TVs (which have extremely nice size for their price) are out due to the overall size of the units - they tend to dominate rooms. Projectors are also not an option because 1) I can't hang them from the ceiling, and 2) leaving it on the coffee table would lead to trouble [​IMG]. And direct-view TVs don't have the size I need.

    This seems to leave me with two choices (unless someone can really sell me on a projector - anyone have pictures?): plasma and LCD. I've seen a lot around here about plasma, but next to nothing about LCD. For instance, there are the Sony 50-60" XBR GrandWEGA LCD screens and they cost less than plasma. Are they also not as good?
     
  9. John-Miles

    John-Miles Screenwriter

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    The Grand Wega is not as deep as most RPTV, but it would be just as dominating ina room.

    nice tv tho ive only seent hem in show rooms.
     
  10. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    John, direct views go up to 40" (32-36" for HDTV's). RPTV's start at 40" and go up to 65-70". If direct view does not give you size and RPTV's are too dominating, what size are you looking for exactly? The range of sizes available seems pretty wide. Granted, a 65" may be "too dominating" but a 50" may not. Also, it seems you are worried about the depth of an RPTV since you are looking at the Grand Wega. An RPTV is really not that deep (average around 18-24") and as far as width and height, a 50-60" CRT RPTV is the same general width and height as a 50-60" Grand Wega.

    The general consnesus about LCD is the blacks are not as good as a CRT and the reliability is not proven yet (especially with the Grand Wega). IMHO, CRT RPTVS still give the best picture, the largest size and the best reliability for the least amount of dollars.
     
  11. John_Q*

    John_Q* Extra

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    My issue with RP TVs is not the actual size of the screen - it's the size of the whole TV including the base. Are there any "tabletop" RPTV models? All the ones I see have the big base attached to them - this is the part that won't go over well with the female half! Basically, the TV needs to be capable of sitting on something.
     
  12. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    Mitsubishi makes a "tabletop" 42" RPTV. It has a stand that you can buy to store components in. The 46" sony is also a tabletop model. "Tabletop" is a misnomer though, the stands are not that tall. You might want to look at the Samsung DLP, which is getting good reviews. It comes in 50" or 60", is very thin (17" or so) and has no base underneath, so you can put it on a piece of furniture for WAF. Expensive, but not as pricey as a plasma.
     
  13. Jefferson Morris

    Jefferson Morris Supporting Actor

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    John_Q,

    I'm far from an expert on this subject, but I'm a similar boat as you. I'm also interested in upgrading to a 16:9 HDTV set, at least 50" diagonal, that doesn't require a crane and a moving van. My basic interest is in having my DVDs look as good as they possibly can.

    As Jeff Gatie suggested, you might take a look at DLP sets. The 50" Samsung seems to be pretty popular, and there's a 56" model coming out shortly. Neither weighs more than 80-90 pounds, and they will sit comfortably on tables.

    I plan to head out to Tweeter or Circuit City soon to see some demos and side-by-side comparisons. To date, I've only seen the 50" Samsung at Best Buy. I believe I noticed the "rainbow" effect that some complain about with DLP, but then again it didn't look as if any of the models on display were properly calibrated.

    --Jefferson Morris
     
  14. John_Q*

    John_Q* Extra

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    Wow, those Samsung DLP sets sound really sweet. Is there anything I should know about them (besides the rainbow effect)?

    Also, where are good places to check out prices and availability for those? They seem to be a bit harder to find than other things.
     
  15. Jefferson Morris

    Jefferson Morris Supporting Actor

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    I imagine Tweeter is a good place for a side-by-side comparison of DLP with other technologies (bring your favorite DVD), if they're in your area. I'm going to head out there this weekend myself, so I'll let you know.

    --Jefferson Morris
     
  16. John_Q*

    John_Q* Extra

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    One more: This is a 720p TV. What happens if I were to try to watch a 1080i broadcast? Is the TV capable of converting this to a 720p signal without bad things happening?
     
  17. Jefferson Morris

    Jefferson Morris Supporting Actor

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    Don't know the answer to that last question, but I just got back from my Tweeter trip. I mentioned my interest in DLP and the salesman all but slapped me. He tried to steer me to a 50" Sony XBR LCD set that was right next to it. The XBR looked great, but it was displaying HD content, which the DLP wasn't, so I couldn't really do a side-by-side comparison. (For some reason, the DLP was the only set in the room that wasn't showing the HD content). I also left my Fellowship of the Ring DVD at home, unfortunately.

    He badmouthed DLP on a number of fronts, telling me the DLP bulbs cost $600 (I've heard $300 or so), and seemingly decrying it as a fad. But he was such a slick salesman that I don't really trust what he said - the kind of guy who prefaces every rhetorical question with, "Let me ask you a question," then gives the answer before you have a chance to respond.

    I told him I was in no hurry to buy, and he recommended waiting for Philips' upcoming 55" LCOS set. The weight (a significant consideration for me) appears comparable to DLP (unlike the comparably sized Toshiba LCOS sets), and the asking price looked right - $3,900, IIRC. I believe the Philips LCOS sets will still theoretically be subject to the rainbow effect, but I guess no one has seen them yet.

    So I came out more confused than when I went in. I was semi gung-ho for DLP at first, and most who have them seem to love them, but I fear I may be in that minority that can't stand the rainbows and other artifacts. But I'm still interested to see the next generation of Sammy DLP later this year. So I'm in a holding pattern.

    --Jefferson Morris
     
  18. John_Q*

    John_Q* Extra

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    Jefferson,
    I've got to say, I really don't like the type of salesman you were dealing with. It sounds to me like the store just makes a smaller profit on Samsungs compared to other brands and so doesn't want to show them off as much.

    Around here, I haven't heard nearly as much about the LCOS sets compared to the DLP sets. LCOS is LCD-based, right? I haven't heard too many positive things on HTF about LCD TVs.

    All that being said, I still haven't seen DLP or LCOS in action, so take everything with a grain of salt. I'm planning to go to a few stores this coming weekend to check out some stuff. I've even got a Tweeter right up the road, so I'll go see what their deal is as well (see if it was either just the salesman, the chain, or the Truth).

    And don't forget your DVD from now on!! :wink:
     
  19. Jefferson Morris

    Jefferson Morris Supporting Actor

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