Fabric on Walls...installation Question

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by tonyGar, Feb 4, 2006.

  1. tonyGar

    tonyGar Agent

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was think of putting guilford of maine fabrics (wall fabric) on the interior walls to help absorb the sound and use some additional sound panels as well.

    1. Do you that is a good idea?
    2. How do you apply the fabric to the wall and is it easy?

    Thanks for the feedback!!
     
  2. PaulT

    PaulT Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2002
    Messages:
    932
    Likes Received:
    0
    GOM fabric is acoustically transparent and is used to 'cover' sound absorbing material (panels), so applying it directly to your wall will not do anything for you other than give you a fabric wall.

    Bud kind of hijacked your other thread about panels, but there is a lot of good info there and links to follow.

    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...hreadid=249429
     
  3. tonyGar

    tonyGar Agent

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ok... so maybe I need fabric that is not transparent. I have been in theaters and studios that have fabric that is kind of carpet like on the walls.... I am just wondering if anyone know what I am talking about and that it helps fight sound reflection like panels too...

    If so how is it installed? Just wondering....

    I saw a very thin carpet at Home Depot and was half tempted to use that but I thought I would post first to get the wisdom of someone who has experience in using this material....

    Thanks again.
     
  4. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2002
    Messages:
    1,865
    Likes Received:
    0
    Home theater professionals use compressed fiber panels that are maybe about 1/2"to 1" thick. Cut them into designer shapes or use simple rectangular shapes and place them in the "mirror" locations on the sides of the room. I would probably only cover the bottom hemisphere of the room and leave the top half more "reflective" which could help with surround sound liveliness. Some theaters experiment with diffusion as well as absorption.

    Rock Wool panels, or compressed fiberglass with hardened edges is what's fairly common. Then you have your more effective fiberglass batting panels that are REALLY thick (4" or so), but those are more effective and absorb a broader band of frequencies due to the thickness.

    Then you apply the fabric over the panels and use adhesive or staples or whatever works best for your application.

    To easily mount them on the walls, you use these rectangular metal brackets that have a bunch of "teeth" on them. You screw these onto the wall and then you just "press" the fiber panel on top and the teeth hold the panel in place. I think you can find these in home improvement stores, I saw a professional home theater use this method for applying compressed fiberglass wall treatments.

    You would want to use a relatively acoustically transparent fabric (porous) over the panels to let sound into the fibers.

    As for carpet... I'd say the softer and thicker the better. I've been inside a room that was lined with sound deadening board and then with thick carpet.

    It was almost like I was in an anechoic chamber and was uncomfortably quiet... though there was still somewhat of a mid range echo when I clapped.
     

Share This Page