Eyeglasses!

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by John Watson, Jun 8, 2003.

  1. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    Within the last 3 years, my wife and I both had new glasses prepared from new prescriptions.

    In both cases, the lenses have been very prone to develop smudges that result in areas of blur, as well as excessive amounts of scratches. My wife has already had hers replaced, and I'm wearing my previous prescription glasses, until I can get around to replacing the pair I'm supposed to be wearing.

    We've both worn glasses for decades. I've never encountered such rapid deterioration before.

    Did we get suckered into some coating that is susceptible to easy damage, or have the manufacturers developed a way of making glass less durable, so we have to buy more, or have we just been unlucky?.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Douglas*A*R

    Douglas*A*R Stunt Coordinator

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    Sounds to me like they weren't hard coated. That's a very thin, transparent resin that is applied to plastics and glass that makes them very scratch resistant. I don't think it should be a problem if you took the glasses back to their place of purchase and have it done. It should take less than an hour if they have the necessary items at their location.

    I don't know if there are significant differences between hard coat formulas. My father is an optical engineer, though, so I'll ask him tomorrow and let you know.
     
  3. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    Are you sure they're glass? Lots of prescriptions are now filled with plastic lenses unless you specifically ask for glass.
     
  4. Eric Kahn

    Eric Kahn Guest

    I am wearing the glasses I got over 4 years ago, they have lenses made of Glass, I will not buy plastic lenses simply because the scratch too easily no matter what coating is on them
    I am waiting for the glasses industry to start offering lenses flash coated with synthetic sapphire like they do with high end watch crystals, second hardest substance known and easy to apply

    but that probably will not happen because they want you to damage your glasses and buy more
     
  5. nolesrule

    nolesrule Producer

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    In my glasses buying experience, plastic's cheaper than glass, even with the added expense of a scratch-proof coating. My plastic lenses are about 4 years old and scratch free.
     
  6. Khoa Tran

    Khoa Tran Supporting Actor

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    don't go to lense crafters they are a rip off, i had my previous glasses for 4-5 years and they don't have a scratch on them, they are the plastic with hard coating, my new glasses the same...i think most people get ripped off with their glasses for not shopping around, i'm wearing designer glasses with all the extra options on the lenses and crap for 200 while when i checked out lense crafters they wanted 180 for cheesy frames and the basic lenses...
     
  7. Aaron Reynolds

    Aaron Reynolds Screenwriter

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    All coatings are not created equal, not only in terms of scratch-resistance, but also flare and proper colour registration. The best coatings I've ever seen were Pentax's SMC (Super Multi Coating), the same stuff they put on their camera lenses. Unfortunately, it is no longer possible to get SMC on your eyeglasses here in Canada.

    Zeiss also have an excellent coating, which at some point was the same as Pentax's SMC -- the two manufacturers had a technology exchange back in the '70s.

    Both of these coatings are expensive, but you get what you pay for. I had an epiphany a number of years ago when I realized I was accepting a far lower standard of quality for my eyeglasses than I ever would for my camera lenses. How backwards is that? [​IMG]
     
  8. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Most "anti-glare" coaring causes smudges out the yin-yang. I hate them. You have to wash your glasses a hundred times a day. I have three year oldpolycarbonate lenses in my everyday glasses and my prescription sunglasses and they are virtually scratch-free after all this time. I don't take especially good care of them.
     
  9. Aaron Reynolds

    Aaron Reynolds Screenwriter

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  10. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    -Thanks for all the info guys, it is likely my lenses are plastic, because they are large and would be quite heavy if glass.

    So it sounds like its the quality of coatings, and I share the concern that the sellers don't want to sell good coatings, for the obvious reason. But I'll try harder to find a better one next time, which may be soon, given the smudges I've got [​IMG]
     
  11. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    "Polycarbonate" is way better than both glass and plastic. Thinner, too. Get it.
     
  12. Peter Kim

    Peter Kim Screenwriter

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    There's something called super(?) high-index (either 1.66, 1.67, 1.7...higher the number, the thinner for the same prescription, although 1.7 might now be illegal). Not sure, but I'd think that the thinner would be much more dense and less prone to scratching.

    However, these are extremely expensive polycarbonate lens 'add-ons'. 4 years back and I got the thinnest my optician sold (1.66) for a total package of about $350-$400.

    But unless I get laser eye surgery, I'll need another pair of glasses soon - and although the price is too steep, the difference in thickness is remarkable.

    BTW...don't let Lens Crafter confuse you with the thin lens offerings (Featherlites?)...it is their own lens thinning process and crap compared to the industry standard.
     
  13. EdR

    EdR Second Unit

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    By far the best way I've found to keep my glasses in good shape is to wash the lenses with soap and water.

    Just rub your finger on the lense with a little soap (wet the lense first), then rinse them off. The drops of water left behind can be wicked away with toilet paper (just touch it to the lense).

    My optometrist recommended this, and it's amazing how well it has preserved my lenses.
     
  14. Cary_H

    Cary_H Second Unit

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    I must concur with them being plastic with a lousy coating or none at all. Plastic is very unforgiving around what you get away cleaning them with.
    Glass is more costly and heavier, but offers superior optics and surface durability. For folks with bat-like eyesight glass optics will be thinner in the same prescription than plastic.
    Glass hi-index is the only way to go for folks like myself. Beyond bat-like. Expensive yes, but hi-index Zeiss lenses are remarkably thin, considering. Conventional glass lenses at similar powers would inflict neckstrain. Plastic at these powers? Certainly not in public....I'm not even sure if Nikon's hi-index cut it.
     
  15. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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