Explain this one...Folding paper

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Jay H, Jun 2, 2003.

  1. Jay H

    Jay H Producer

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    My snapple I had a Snapple Fact on the bottlecap which says:

    "no piece of paper can be folded more than 7 times"

    Huh? Obviously I must be missing something about the definition of "folded" but certainly I can find a big enough piece of paper to fold into an accordian and more than 7 times... [​IMG]

    Jay
     
  2. Dave_Brown

    Dave_Brown Supporting Actor

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    I think they mean in half more than 7 times. Obviously you can take any sheet of paper and make 7 folds all over the place. But I think once it hits 7 it gets to think to fold anymore times? [​IMG]
     
  3. Ricardo C

    Ricardo C Producer

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    What if it is a 200 sq. ft. piece of toilet paper? :p)
     
  4. Danny R

    Danny R Supporting Actor

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    The usual full quote is "No piece of paper can be folded more than 7 times in half"

    Accordian style thus doesn't qualify. And while it does get difficult because of the increasing paper thickness, it certainly isn't an absolute:

    Ask Dr. Math
     
  5. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    What Dave said. This is not a fundamental law of physics, but more of an odd rule-of-thumb. A typical piece of paper can't easily be folded in half more than seven times. It's too thick and to small to be folded anymore.

    Using thinner paper should allow for more folds. Sharper creases could help too.

    Try it and see [​IMG]
     
  6. Lee L

    Lee L Supporting Actor

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    I have all kinds of construction blueprints around the office that beg to differ. [​IMG] Most are 24"x36" and some even larger. Of course 99% of construction prints aren't actually blue anymore, just black and white Xerographic reporductions on large paper.
     
  7. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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    I saw this tested on a kids' program a long time ago. They started with a large (maybe 8ft by 8ft?) piece of thin paper, and managed about 7 or 8 folds before the bundle was too thick to fold any further.
     
  8. Lee L

    Lee L Supporting Actor

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    Actually, I did try this yesterday with an approximately 24x36 piece of paper and I could only fold it 7 times before it got too stiff. It appeared that because of all the folding back and forth, the layers were locking together, giving the whole thing a certain structural rigidity that made it too stiff. Maybe they are on to something, althought with something less than 20# Xerographic bond it would be easier.
     

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