Experience with Drylok latex paint/Fast Plug?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Jay H, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. Jay H

    Jay H Producer

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    Any pros and cons or tips to recommend to me? I've got a leaky basement that I'd like to seal. Have heard of Drylok and Fast Plug to seal the floor/wall joint. The Drylok is supposedly good to 22ft and 10lbs/in2 pressure. Thinking of doing it this winter before the spring melt. My basement is mostly poured concrete (painted though) but a section which is real porous is concrete block so I want to do two walls facing uphill with the fast plug and then paint the lower 2ft or so of the cinder blocks. I have water coming up from below and not a drainage problem that I'd like to address before spring...

    Jay
     
  2. TonyD

    TonyD Who do we think I am?
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    i sealed 2 concrete walls that are part of my foundation over a year ago with this and havent seen a drop of water yet.
     
  3. Jay H

    Jay H Producer

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    That's good to hear Tony! I read the instructions and they say for the masonry paint itself, not to do it below a surface or air temp of 50degs. Since I run my house fairly cold, my basement is just about 50degs so I'll probably hold off til the spring. I hate winter rains!

    Jay
     
  4. Micah Cohen

    Micah Cohen Screenwriter

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    Jay! If you have "water coming up from below" Drylock will not do much for you. It could cost some $, but a good french drain and sump pump system will end your worries forever. Could be between $1000-$2000, depending upon the length of the cut, but doing one wall alone may be less expensive. Otherwise, Drylock rocks for keeping the damp inside of concrete block from coming into the basement.

    Happy new year! (I hung the bike, then the temps went back to the 50s... Sheesh! Global warming - I'm all for it!)

    MC
     
  5. Jay H

    Jay H Producer

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    Ohhh, well it's certainly coming up from below, because I get running water for 2-3 days after a moderate rain event that has stopped. Plus, all the gutters are already emptying at least 10ft from the house and I don't see any leaks.

    Hmmm, I don't care for the the water on the concrete, I don't like the moisture and possible mold/mildew associated with it.

    A french drain fixes the symptons but not the cause.

    I already have a sump pump which handles the majority of the leakage in the small laundry room which is lower than the main basement and also an addition to the house so it has major leakage there. I'm more concerned about fixing the small cracks in the foundation (poured concrete) in the main downstairs area where I have stuff in storage. The previous owner fixed in such a way that there is little chance of serious flooding in the main room because water will eventually trickle it's way to the lower laundry room where the sump pump is and even in a power outage, water will eventually make it's way out the door to the back yard which is lower than the front.

    I'll look into french drains but I think I can still patch the cracks and the floor/wall seam with Drylok Fast Plug effectively.

    P.S. still haven't had time to make my bike carrier, busy busy busy. I'm too busy enjoying the winter and doing snowshoes hikes in the catskills and the ADKs.

    Jay
     
  6. TonyD

    TonyD Who do we think I am?
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    my foundation in the basement had 2 cracks on 2 different sections from cracks running top to bottom.
    about 3 ft.
    all below ground level.
    i sealed 1, 12 ft length with the drylok
    and the other crack on a longer wall, just a 2 ft radius around the crack.

    still no leaks.
     
  7. Micah Cohen

    Micah Cohen Screenwriter

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    Well, we might be talking about two different things here. Drylock and such will not STAUNCH THE FLOW of water coming UP from, say, underground. Water finds its own level, even from up under concrete flooring. There could be a history of wet and wetness from rains and from underground right under your basement -- an underground creek flow, for instance. (I had this. Solved it completely with a french drain.)

    A french drain makes the visible floor dry, and takes away the water that seeps up from below or that may run down side walls (and collect on the concrete floor). The french drain is under the concrete, and sloughs off the moisture to a sump pump in a hole (or, to your existing sump pump in that lower portion of the basement). But the key is that the french drain keeps the floor dry no matter where water comes from.

    Point is, you can't stop water. Ever. It will always come back. Drylock and such "work," I have my rear basement wall Drylocked right now, but not for good and not forever. Water finds a way. Up or through or around, water will always win. The trick to the french drain-and-sump pump set up is that it allows the water to continue winning, without inconveniencing you.

    MC
     
  8. Jay H

    Jay H Producer

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    Well, I know that one of the water leaks is a small crack in the foundation and that was Drylok Fast Plug is for. The oil based or latex based paint is kind of secondary as I don't think I'm getting seeping through the floor or the walls. So I'm pretty sure the one small leak I have in the main room can be fixed. And the other leak on the other part of the wall I think is seepage between the floor/wall. But that isn't as obvious though I can't see it coming from anything but the seam. Once I fix those, the main basement area should be water free for now. Then I'm move onto the lower basement which has some major leakage there. However, the way the floor is actually leveled, it's practically has it's own French Drain!

    Jay
     
  9. RogerOne

    RogerOne Auditioning

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    I had a local company come to my home with a proposal to control a leak in our walk out basement. The price was about $5,000 and they proposed collecting the water to a sump and pumping it outside - in other words not fixing the leak at all. Instead I bought a container of Fast Plug and a can of the UGL Extreme Latex Masonry Waterproofing paint. The leak was where a concrete block wall met the concrete floor. I ground out about 1/4 inch of the mortar between the block and the floor and cleaning the surface of the floor and the wall with the grinder for about two inches in both directions. Then I generously filled that area where I removed the mortar and about a half an inch up the wall and onto the floor. They I painted several coats of the paint over the fast plug and up the wall and on the floor. The next year we had about 20 inches of rain in one week and we did not have a single drop of water come into the house.
     

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