EQ for a Denon 4802?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chris Tabor, Dec 7, 2002.

  1. Chris Tabor

    Chris Tabor Stunt Coordinator

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    Would it be a waste of money to get an EQ for my denon 4802? What would the advantages be?
     
  2. Chris Tabor

    Chris Tabor Stunt Coordinator

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    come on someone has to have an answer
     
  3. Laurence_C

    Laurence_C Stunt Coordinator

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    Chris, most purest on this board will say its a waste of time and money. Then there are those purest that will say get one but only for the use of correcting problematic room acoustics. I'm not a purest and I don't have a problem with room acoustics, that being said I have 2 Audio Control C-101 series III equalizers for the fronts and rears. I mainly use them for 5 channel stereo mode, sounds great despite what the "Purests" say. It's all in what you think sounds good. I don't however use them while I have a movie going, it just doesn't work. I'd try looking at Audio Control, they are solid!!!
     
  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Chris,

    A lot of good info in Laurence’s post if you read between the lines.

    Regardless of what the “purists” say, most speakers can benefit with a little equalization, because very few speakers have reasonably flat response. And the right equalizer can help with response problems added by the room – how much so depends on how sophisticated the equalizer is.

    The first situation anyone wanting to equalize a home theater will encounter, as Laurence noted, is that you can’t do it with just “an equalizer.” Home theater is a six (or more) channel system, so each channel you intend to equalize has to have its own dedicated equalizer channel. That means a minimum of three standard stereo equalizers to cover all six channels, or a multi-channel piece specially designed for home theater. Neither option is cheap.

    The next situation is that you have to have a way to connect the equalizers. For home theater, the only way to do this is between the pre-amp and amplifier sections. This means you must have pre-out and main-in connections for all channels. Virtually no receivers have these connections for all channels, so that means you must use at least some outboard amplifiers. As you can see, the list of hardware is starting to get pretty involved.

    So if you intend to EQ your complete system, Chris, be prepared to ante up a minimum of $800-1000 in equalizers and amps, even for good used equipment.

    Some other good advice from Laurence – if you’re looking at home audio brands, don’t waste your time or money with anything else but AudioControl. The cheapie $75-100 stereo equalizers from Radio Shack and Best Buy aren’t worth having.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  5. Laurence_C

    Laurence_C Stunt Coordinator

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    Chris, I'll add a little more to what Wayne and I have said. An equalizer can add so much more to music and I mean music only, but only if used and set-up correctly. AudioControl is very user friendly, has excellent user manuals and they explain step by step just how to use their equalizers. Sound City has the AudioControl Rialto(a 7 channel home theater equalizer for $599), they are an authorized dealer and you probably could talk them down a little. Good luck if you head down this path.
     
  6. RobCar

    RobCar Stunt Coordinator

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    I've heard good things about the Yamaha EQ 550 ... but that's only 2 channel. Can I use it to adjust music when I'm playing it through the two mains and then turn it off for movies? I listen to a lot of live music, and much of it would benefit from an EQ's influence, I believe. I don't have separates.
     
  7. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    If your receiver has a switchable tape monitor loop, you could connect an equalizer there. However, you would have to be sure to disengage the loop when watching movies; otherwise your system will default to Dolby Pro-Logic.
    However, many late-model receivers do not have a tape monitor loop. This leaves only two options for two-channel music use:
    • Connect the equalizer in-line between the music source (i.e., CD player) and the receiver’s input.
    • Connect it between the receiver’s L/R pre-outs and main-ins. The equalizer has a bypass switch, which you would engage if you don’t want equalization for movies.
    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  8. Phil Mays

    Phil Mays Second Unit

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    WOW,

    I love to EQ, and as others have commented my Onkyo does not have a tape loop. I have run my CD player through my tape to get the connection. Wayne gave some greast info OI will pirint and try. If I want to EQ each channel what would I do again. Also can I not EQ dolby if I use an EQ for each channel?

    BTW, I have the Yamaha -550 and am totally pleased.
     
  9. Laurence_C

    Laurence_C Stunt Coordinator

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    Phil, There are only 2 ways I know of to use an equalizer on each channel. (1) you need pre-out/main in loops for all of your channels, or (2) run your pre-outs to the equalizer and then to a power amp, each channel has to be done this way.
     

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