Eliminating vinyl pops with Sound Forge

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Daren Welsh, Apr 8, 2003.

  1. Daren Welsh

    Daren Welsh Supporting Actor

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    I've got an old record that I'm trying to rip so I can burn it to a CD. When I play it, there's a lot of pops and crackling (most likely due to several decades of dust). So I figured I might be able to clean up the audio quality using some sort of filter in Sound Forge 6. Can anyone fill me in on how to smooth out the sound?
     
  2. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    There is no filter that is without trade offs. I'm not sure which exist as direct X plugins (which would be needed to work with sound Forge)- but forge has no native tools to fix it, without doing it manually.

    -Vince
     
  3. Daren Welsh

    Daren Welsh Supporting Actor

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    I'm using Ortofon Nightclubs (not that I bought them from Needle Doctor) on Technics 1200s through a Pioneer DJM-600 mixer, then through my Pioneer VSX-35TX (basically as a passthrough) to my HTPC's Hercules GameTheater XP 6.1 stereo RCA input. The audio quality on everything else I've recorded through my mixer has been top-notch. So I know the record has to be pretty dirty. I'll try to find some cleaning supplies at a local store ... I've been meaning to, but haven't done it yet.

    I figured I might be able to use some software to reduce the popping for a first cut until I get that record cleaned up, or in the possible case that it's not able to be restored.
     
  4. Jeff Lehr

    Jeff Lehr Stunt Coordinator

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    If you want a simple cleaning solution for vinyl records, just use distilled water (steam distilled is best) with about 5%-10% isopropyl alcohol...go to your local drugstore and try to find at least the 91% isopropyl. Don't use the common 70%...it's not pure enough to be used on vinyl...too many other things in it.
    You'll then need a wetting agent to break the surface tension of the water and make the solution flow better.
    You can get by with a couple drops of Dawn dishsoap, but you can't use too much, otherwise it will leave a residue on the record. Better to use something called Kodak Photo-Flo...if you have a photography studio or darkroom supply shop in your area they should have it. You only need a couple drops of this stuff in your solution...a little goes a long way.
    Now you need a record brush to scrub your record with this solution...you can make a quick and dirty one by going to a fabric shop and finding some velvet. Then wrap the velvet around a small block of wood (like a 1"x1"x 3" long). Pour some solution on the record using a small squeeze bottle (careful not to get the label wet), then spread the solution with the brush you made, scrubbing the record going with the grooves all around a couple of times.
    After getting it scrubbed and letting the solution loosen up the dirt, soak up the excess with a clean cotton cloth, then make sure you rinse right away with straight distilled water...do this a couple of times, maybe even 3.
    If you don't rinse after cleaning, the residue left by the solution will make the record sound even noisier than before you cleaned it.
    Let it air dry completely before you play it.
    Sorry this got so long...I just didn't want you to go out and use any commercial cleaners on your vinyl...some of them have some nasty chemicals that don't get along with vinyl very well.
    Anyway...hope this helps a little.

    JL
     

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