Electrical questions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brad Jay, Jun 7, 2002.

  1. Brad Jay

    Brad Jay Agent

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    I am putting together my first HT setup while the room is being built. Will I need any special electric. I bought a Monster Power 2500 and it looks like all I need is a Regular wall socket and everything will plug into the MP2500.

    I will have 2 amps, one for my SVS and one 5 channel for the Martin Logans. The salesman I bought them from never mentioned a regulator but the guy that dropped them off said I should get one and he also suggested I return the MP2500 for a better one. If I upgrade the MP2500 would the regulator be unnecessary.

    Is the delivery guy trying to make a sale or is the regulator needed. I have done a search here and It doesn't look like to many people use them.
     
  2. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Brad,
    To start out, yes, you want a SURGE SUPPRESSOR which is the main function of Monster HTS2500. It's true that this model doesnt get the best raves (see the other thread in this tweaks board).
    If you tell us more about your needs, it may be that you can be just fine with the TrippLite ISOBAR6 DBS which sells for about $59. The unit carries F-terminals to run your cableTV coax or satellite dish coax as well.
    Are you getting a newly built house, like still in framing, or modifying an existing room? This has bearing on whether you have the option for installation of a dedicated 120VAC circuit (and I believe 15A wud be fine for most) in which there are no other arrays of lights, motors, fans on the same circuit.
    Nobody at the door can tell you need a "regulator" (voltage regulator?) without knowing if you have crappy electrical power coming into the house -- brownouts, blackouts, power surges, power sags in the neighborhood. There's some confusion in terms here.
    Voltage regulators carry transformers and cost around $1,200. Not to confuse the issue, but there are people who graduate to "balanced power" and "voltage stabilizer" units, again costly, for specific audio needs.
    The TrippLite absorbs any huge electrical surges and is designed to be replaced in that case, hopefully having protected your gear. Again, in new home stage, people also install a "whole house" surge protector at the breaker box for around $200 or less. This wud be the first line of defense in addition to the surge protector at the point of your gear. A lot depends if you live in a part of the country that's plaqued by electrical/lightning storms.
    Just to get an idea of the variety of units by Monster and Panamax, check www.discountpanamax.com
    bill
     
  3. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Bill: do you have any reasonably priced suggestions for an individual to ascertain the quality of their power?
    While not specifically on topic, if its protecting your investment that you just made, it'd pay to take a very close look at your homeowners insurance and find out just what it is they cover and whether that's for full replacement cost or pro-rated. Even within those two broad categories, there are fine points.
     
  4. Brad Jay

    Brad Jay Agent

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    Bill,
    Thanks for the reply. It is existing construction. I will go check out your link to learn more.
     
  5. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Brad, it will be important to know what else will be on that living room or rec room or great room electrical circuit -- wherever your home theater is located -- to stay within rated amperage range.

    A 15A circuit (14gauge wire) nominally handles 1800 watts. Applying the 80 percent safety rules, that's 1440 watts.

    A 20A circuit handles 2400 watts, or a safety-rated 1920 watts. Add up the chassis plate amp rating on each piece of gear, mainly the power amps, plus TV, DVD, VHS, etc. to see where you fall.

    If your research leads you to believe some surge protectors impart "current limiting" degradation to your primary power amp, by all means looks for a better protector in the $300-$500 range.

    Chu Gai makes a good point for homeowners to find out the flavor of electronic gear replacement the insurance covers as a backup -- if not primary coverage -- for any damage to the house that ruins your electronics. You'll note that surge unit makers offer a $50,0000 to $1 million of some ridiculous amount guaranatee or warranty. But it's important to be able to rely on homeowner insurance, too.

    Chu Gai asks how people can determine the quality of their power? I don't know. In my case, I talked with a senior engineer at my local power company a year ago when I was setting upmy system and after 30 minutes came away satisfied with the reliability of my local power company's voltage regulation and the absense of weather-related electrical storm spike/surges where I live.

    There's something of a tutorial, tho self-serving, at the Richard Gray's Power Company website.
     
  6. Mike Matheson

    Mike Matheson Second Unit

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    Brad,

    If your house is still in the being built phase, Bill's suggestion about considering installing a dedicated circuit is a good one (actually, all of his suggestions are good ones--he's a knowledgeable guy). Dedicated circuits can help eliminate some noise on the line (from lights, dimmers, etc.). You'd still probably want a surge protector though. . .

    There are lots of threads discussing dedicated circuits here at HTF--if interested, just do a search.
     

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