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Edited TV on DVD concerns (1 Viewer)

DeathStar1

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Neil
This got me wondering. Are Studios required to save the original prints of a show, or are they allowed to throw them out?

With the edited versions of Mr.Bean being found on the A&E sets, I'm worried that edited versions of other shows, especially older shows that where aired on USA Network wich is known for heavy edits, may weasel their way into the DVD market as well. Especially since the edited versions may have been around longer and are easier to access than the orignial uncut masters...

Anyone think this might become a trend with other companies to 'accidentally' release edited stuff on a suppposedly uncut release? Or are these potential worries not worth being concerned about?
 

Derek Miner

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As someone who works in TV, I don't believe this is much of a concern.

When shows turn up somewhere like USA, the network is usually provided with clones (copies) of the show masters which the network edits how they see fit. The people who own the original show usually don't touch it. In syndication, however, the people who own the show often distribute it as well, and thus make those editing decisions. But I can't believe shows made sometime in the last 20 to 30 years would have missing masters that would result in edited versions being used for home video.

Shows older than that turning up on home video in edited form I can believe, probably due to bad recordkeeping or lack of available masters. The Monkees has always aired in syndication (and on MTV, Nickelodeon & VH1) with some revised episodes including different songs than originally aired. But when Rhino released the whole series on video, they were presented as originally aired. Incidentally, Rhino owns all those materials related to the show, so they can make the decision as to how to present them.

I don't know what the arrangement for Mr. Bean is with A&E, but it could be a licensing agreement where they only get to use whatever is given to them. I recall some complaints about parts of Monty Python's Flying Circus being edited on the A&E DVDs, which turned out to be because that's all the BBC provided to them.
 

Chad R

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There are no laws if that's what you mean. And as the show is the property of the studios they can do with them as they please. However, they would never destroy anything nowadays as these things are considered assets, and with the surgence of TV on DVD they are considered assets now more than ever.

I agree with Derek, this case smells more of bad record keeping than anything else.
 

Ben_D

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Apr 16, 2003
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I know some of the "Little House on the Prairie" videos provided by TimeLife were edited versions--those releases were coordinated with GoodTimes Video, but I don't know why some of the tapes had the edited version instead of the complete version. It makes me wonder what versions will turn up on the upcoming Imavision DVD season sets.
 

Derek Miner

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I agree with Derek, this case smells more of bad record keeping than anything else.
Well, I suppose we might assume some poor recordkeeping on the part of the BBC, but I'm not going to accuse them...

Poor recordkeeping might be the culprit on the Little House on the Prairie releases mentioned above. I find it disappointing that Time-Life would release a series to video with editing, even if it may have been inadvertent.
 

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