Early TV is a great way to study early Babyboomer culture.

Discussion in 'TV Shows' started by Tom_mkfty, May 26, 2005.

  1. Tom_mkfty

    Tom_mkfty Stunt Coordinator

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    The TV 100 Favourites remind me of what TV was like during my toddler years.

    The poor quality reminds me of *old aerial TV* and rabbit ears.

    The Lone Ranger reminds me of the popularity of cowboy shows.

    As a kid, I never paid attention to Dragnet,
    but I remember that badge at the end, with the end credits and music.

    One Step Beyond was the first TV show I started to follow.
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Tom, I don't see any mention of DVD in your post, so it has been moved from the Software area to here. Carry on.
     
  3. Tom_mkfty

    Tom_mkfty Stunt Coordinator

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    Early TV is early babyboomer.

    Beginning with Disney.

    Two sets of neighbours: one had three girls, the other had two boys.

    The girls bought soundtrack from, Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf.

    The boys like to hear the Davy Crockett soundtrack.

    There the stereotype started.

    I don't consider Leave It To Beaver, as a sitcom because it was too serious to be a comedy. A rolemodel.

    Ever notice the serious tone of early TV?
    Dragnet, Leave It To Beaver, Gunsmoke, Combat,and One Step Beyond all had SERIOUS tones even though they were different genres.
     
  4. Moe Maishlish

    Moe Maishlish Supporting Actor

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    Whenever I watch The Flintstones, I'm reminded of how different the male & female roles were back in 50's & 60's North American society, whereby men were the working stiffs, and women were typically housewives, and stayed at home taking care of the house & children. Very rarely in that show did you ever see a working woman (other than Mr. Slate's secretary)...

    Of course, it's a prehistoric show, so you'd expect to see prehistoric sexist portrayals... but it's still entertaining. [​IMG]

    Moe.
     
  5. Jeffrey Nelson

    Jeffrey Nelson Screenwriter

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    I believe the TV 100 Favorites is a DVD set of a bunch of old public domain TV shows. Poor quality is also mentioned. So, it might belong in the Software forum after all.
     

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