Dynamic Compression (DD/DDEX)

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by JeremyFr, Feb 1, 2003.

  1. JeremyFr

    JeremyFr Supporting Actor

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    Ok quick question in real world HT use what is the best compression setting to use for dynamic compression on your reciever?

    I realize that Max runs full dynamic range and is exactly as it was recorded, then you have STD which seems to make the volume a little more manageable where you have a lot of quiet and then load scenes. and then MIN which seems to make everything quiet and is great for watching stuff late at night etc where you dont wanna crank it up.

    It seems though that when I have set to max so I'm not losing a thing and I tend to have a hard time hearing dialog and so I of course turn it up but then something loud will happen that damn near blows me out of my couch. With STD it seems to regulate this a little better for me and I'm not having to reach for my remote alot less while watching a movie.

    Prime example my wife and I sat down to watch Lilo & Stich last night and I had it set to MAX as usual and it made for some very loud scenes so I changed the compression to std and it seemed to make the soundtrack a little more regulated and scenes like the chase scene at the end of the movie were not hugely overpowering but still sounded great in relation to the movie.

    So basically I'm wondering what some other peoples views on this are and what settings you use.
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    I always leave it off. If there's a problem hearing dialogue, it might indicate the need for some additional tweaking of your normal settings. (Has your system been calibrated with an SPL meter?)

    M.
     
  3. JeremyFr

    JeremyFr Supporting Actor

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    no I need to go spend the money on one here just haven't done it yet.
     
  4. Geoff L

    Geoff L Screenwriter

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    As Mike asked and you answered, no, this is very important.

    A Rat Shack-SPL Meter and a calibration disc (Avia or VE) is very important to get your systems channel levels set up correctly!

    After it is properly calibrated if you are still having a tuff time hearing the center than trouble shoot.

    FIRST:::>
    Make sure your Center is properly AIMED to your seating postion. A laser pointer works very nice for this. Also make sure you bring the Center channel speaker all the way out to the very edge, (even a tiny bit over the edge) of the tv set, (if it is setting on top).

    These things (AIMING & CENTER SPEAKER TO THE EDGE), should be done BEFORE calibrating your system. These can help make the centers dialouge easier and clearer to hear. If you do these things and calibrate only to find it is still difficult & hard to hear, a speaker up grade may be in order.

    Hope this offers some usefull information and helps your current situation...

    Regards
    Geoff
     
  5. EduardoBonifaz

    EduardoBonifaz Stunt Coordinator

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    My friend;
    as I know the dynamic range compression rate is as follows;
    standard is the way the sound engineer recorded the soundtrack, max is suggested to use if you don´t want sudden changes in sound volume ( watching a movie late night ie), the lower the compression rate the louder of the sounds (not always the best) and according to the other reviewres I suggest tuning your system witha SPL meter
     
  6. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    eduardo, hola

    Jeremy's "clinical" experimentation, in his lead-off post, accurately describes how Dolby's Dynamic Range Compression is designed to work.

    MAX = maximum frequency range
    STANDARD = a slightly compressed range of lows to highs
    MIN = The most compressed, or minimum range.

    All of the information the sound engineer has recorded is there in maximum range.

    This feature comes with all Dolby Digital 5.1 receiver/processors and applies to our DVD movies played in DD5.1 (but not for DTS mode).

    Try it yourself late some night to see if the reduced range or "midnight mode" settings are something you would want to use at times. The dialog level remains approximately the same, just the levels of highs and lows are reduced, or compressed.

    buena suerte
     

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