DVI input ( TV ) question

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Frank*M, Jul 9, 2005.

  1. Frank*M

    Frank*M Auditioning

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    What does this DVI ( digitl visual interface ) input do?
    Is it best to buy a DVD player, with this output or is the S-Video connection good enough?
    Maybe a satellite receiver is the best way to maximize the DVI potential?
    Any insight would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Frank
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Hi Frank.

    It is a digital cable that transmits video signals to your television. It is also a copy-protection technique since the "destination" end must constantly tell the "source" end that it is not recording anything.


    Well - component output on a DVD player is necessary for progressive-scan video.

    To date - people who have done side-by-side comparisons of DVI and Component output have seen little difference in video quality.

    Should you buy a DVD player with one? - Well, it would not hurt to have a different output type. But how many DVI inputs does your television have? Most TV's have 2 or 3 component inputs, but only 1 DVI input.

    IMHO: DVI wont really 'arrive' until televisions offer multiple DVI inputs and HT recievers/switch box's also offer multiple inputs.

    Add that the DVI cable is usually more expensive than component cables and you will see why I am a little cool on the "DVI potential".

    (Dont get me wrong - I love the digital nature of the connection, but there are drawbacks.)

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. Frank*M

    Frank*M Auditioning

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    Bob,
    Thanks for the reply.
    Sounds like component cables are the way to go for the dvd player and DVI for a HD satellite receiver in the future.

    But if I get that receiver, sounds like I can't record anything? Is that true?

    Frank
     
  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    If you want to record things, look into a HighDef PVR like the one from Dish network. Your local cable company might also start offering HD PVR's (My local company does).

    These are great ways to time-shift programming in HD. Last summers Olympics and "Desperate Housewives" in HD were fantastic - even with only 8 hours of recording time.

    If you really want to record things off, consider a Tivo unit with a built-in DVD burner. These only give you standard-def video, but it is better than nothing.

    Recording HiDef is ... controversial. Hollywood does not want just anybody making HD copies. They fear (and with good reason), that someone would make a HD copy, then use it to master thousands of video CD's/VHS tapes and sell things over-seas.
     
  5. Frank*M

    Frank*M Auditioning

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    Bob,
    This is a great help, Thanks again.
    I'm not interested in recording besides TIVO.
    I just want to get the most out of my Sony KV-36HS500 HD ready TV ( picture quality-wise ). Tivo HD receiver W/ COMPONENT connentions sounds like it will give me the same picture quality as DVI ?
    Also going to buy a DVD/VCR combo player. I should just make sure it has component connections right?
    Thanks again,
    Frank
     
  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Let's be careful here.

    Most likely the DVD portion will have component outputs, but not inputs.

    The jacks for the DVD side and VCR side are usually separated. So you will likely have to run different cables to different inputs on your TV for each of these.

    Unless you have a library of tapes you still watch, forget about a DVD/VCR combo. Look into a DVD recorder. Some of the nicer units have a hard-drive that let you record things then do simple edits to remove commercials, but you burn things to DVD R media. These are cheaper, take up less space and are usually better quality than VHS tapes.
     
  7. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    i would say, when i did my own comparisons, that there was a slight increase in pic quality via dvi. the edges were a little smoother and the picture a little brighter. tbh, i really had to look for it, but it was definitely there.

    also, don't forget about hdmi. hdmi carries the same video signal as dvi, but it also includes an audio signal as well. if you look at any late model tv or dvd player you'll see that they're using hdmi now. i'm pretty sure dvi is already on it's way out....
     

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