DVD's with holes drilled in the cases: What's up with that?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Scott Leopold, Aug 27, 2002.

  1. Scott Leopold

    Scott Leopold Supporting Actor

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    I got thinking about this a while back after posting in a thread about bootlegs, then thought about it again after reading the most recent thread on DVD's on Ebay. A lady I used to work with was buying DVD's from one of her mother's friends for $10 apiece. Basically, it turned out that most of these were homemade bootlegs of very low quality (burned from a videotape taken in the theater). However, a large number of them were genuine, official DVD's; the only thing is, they had a small hole drilled in the upper left-hand corner of the case. I forget which one, but one of the DVD's I picked up used was drilled in the same way. Does anyone know what's up with this? I didn't think much of it when I bought one that way, but after seeing all the ones my former coworker brought in, I'm guessing it's similar to paperbacks with the cover ripped off (in other words, unsold copies that the retailer is returning to the distributor for a credit).
     
  2. Peter Apruzzese

    Peter Apruzzese Producer

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    Usually, DVDs (and CDs) that are drilled out in the manner you describe are promotional copies and are not intended for retail sale. They might be review copies or other giveaways. The bar code is drilled so that the item can not be returned to a store or the manufacturer for credit.

    Another possibility is that the drilled-out titles are DVDs that have been sold through a volume liquidator. Again, the bar code is defaced so that they can not be returned to the manufacturer. These may be DVDs that are now out-of-print. This is similar to the days of "cut-out" records.
     
  3. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    We'll ignore the bootlegs for now.

    Often, DVDs (or CDs, and, in the past, vinyl LPs) that are sent out for promotional purposes (to be reviewed perhaps) will be hole-punched to alert any retailers who might be duped into buying one. The vast, vast majority of my CDs, for example, are review copies. And the label sides of the discs often read "for promotional use only."

    Also cutouts and out-of-print titles are sold to certain retailers through jobbers who do the hole-punching on the cases and covers.
     
  4. MatS

    MatS Screenwriter

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    What Peter said
     
  5. Mark_Wilson

    Mark_Wilson Screenwriter

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    I've got a few LD 'punch outs'. These we're all liquidations.
     
  6. Joel Fontenot

    Joel Fontenot Supporting Actor

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    Aren't punch-outs or cut-outs (in the case of the days of LP's) supposed to reduce the value so that they can be sold at much cheaper prices too?

    Joel
     
  7. AllanN

    AllanN Supporting Actor

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    I purchased a twin pack of PS2 games (basically you got one older game for free) and they had holes drilled in them. Probably so you could not buy the $50 pack then return them separately for there $70 face value.
     
  8. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

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    Several decades ago I was in Columbia House buying records (33-1/3 RPM) and many of them had holes punched in one corner. I had always thought that they were returns (Most, but not all, of them were not shrink-wrapped.

    Glenn
     
  9. Jorge Montes

    Jorge Montes Stunt Coordinator

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    You know, my free copy of "Man on the Moon" from Universal for buying "Jurassic Park 3" had a big ol' drill hole right through it barcode. Yet, my review copy of "Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back" is untouched. Odd.
     
  10. Art Martinez

    Art Martinez Stunt Coordinator

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    Well, it has already been said but I'll say it again just to throw my hat in the ring. The punch out is done so that promotional copies can't be returned to a retailer for money. When I worked at a radio station a couple years ago we would receive new CD's a week or so early in order to give out on air for publicity. (of course working at the station I was always able to get my hands on a CD or two, which is why I now own over 1200 CD's)[​IMG]
    Anyway the CD's we got for promotional distribution always had the bar codes punched out, and some even went as far as printing on the cover sheet that said "FOR PROMOTIONAL USE ONLY. SALE OR OTHER TRANSFER IS PROHIBITED. MUST BE RETURNED ON DEMAND OF RECORDING COMPANY."
    The funny thing is I now work in retail and most people in retail have no clue what it means when the bar code is punched out. Perhaps it has been just my experience, but it seems that only people in the industry or that follow it know what these punch outs are for. Kind of ironic that it is a devise to stop promotional copies from being sold but people outside of the industry that stand to get "taken" don't know about it.
     

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