DVD's that look like crap on a big screen?

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Ryan L. Bisasky, Sep 6, 2005.

  1. Ryan L. Bisasky

    Ryan L. Bisasky Second Unit

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    to a point where it is acceptible on a smaller screen or a regular 4x3 tv, but when upgrade to an hdtv, the dvd now looks like crap.
    Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon the dvd looks like it might have been pal sourced, or columbia had a bad copy to begin with
    Austin Powers 1. there is so much grain/noise its not even funny.
    and i have a 57' sony hdtv.
     
  2. TravisR

    TravisR Studio Mogul

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    It seems like for every DVD made, someone thinks it looks bad. In other words, it seems inevitable that a bigger screen makes it easier to see the flaws.
     
  3. John Whittle

    John Whittle Stunt Coordinator

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    This probably belongs in the HOme Theatre Hardware section, but there just isn't enough information here to give an answer.

    Need to know:

    DVD player
    TV Set MODEL and METHOD of display (CRT/DLP/LCD/LCOS/PLASMA) and the effective native resolution

    How DVD player is connected

    Who did the calibration of the display device

    and distance from the screen.

    That's for a start

    All of your comments could be explained by poor set up, bad connection, bad telecine transfer and other associated equipment (line doubler, HDMI upconverting DVD player, etc).

    So it's hard to say. Some early DVD do have problems, most of the ones I've come across were LBX transfers inside 3:4 frames and just don't have the resolution to hold up to a 1.78 screen, but most of the later (last couple of years) 16:9 transfer from major studios do hold up well, some better than others, but over all hold up.

    John
     
  4. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Backdraft is very difficult to watch on the bigscreen and frankly, I would like to see a completely new version of this good film.... very grainy
     
  5. Paul D G

    Paul D G Screenwriter

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    McCartney's Live in Red Square is a disgrace on my WS. Looks like some of the Video On Demand stuff off the cable box.

    -paul
     
  6. Dave Mack

    Dave Mack Producer

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    I recently got an optoma dlp FP, an oppo. upscaling dvd player and a 92" greywolf screen. With this now calibrated settup, good transfers can be breathtaking. But things such as EE, filtering and compression artifacts can be REALLY noticeable. I was surprised how lackluster "Road To Perdition" looked. But ironically, the deleted scenes looked MUCH better. More detail, no EE.
    "Gangs of NY" in the opening fight scene in the snow is horrid.

    What's surprising is how many smaller films can look great. Barfly, Romeo is Bleeding, State of Grace. These were relatively low profile releases and the telecine operator probably didn't even bother much to "tweak" the picture. These look WAY better than the above mentioned BIG titles.

    IMHO, of course... [​IMG] d
     
  7. Don Solosan

    Don Solosan Supporting Actor

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    This is a pretty common problem. DVDs mastered at a low bit-rate, etc., really show their flaws when you go to a big screen/projector system. The original release of The Fifth Element, compared to the SuperBit, is another classic example.
     
  8. David Ruiz

    David Ruiz Second Unit

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    As many people have stated over the past, bitrate doesn't have anything to do with it. It's less filtering that brings out more detail. The higher bitrate just helps keep compression artifacts to a minimum.
     
  9. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    Neil, trust me, Backdraft looks bad on ANY size display, truly, truly aweful. [​IMG] That, and the original dvd for The Hunt for Red October, thank goodness we have a better version of that one, though.

    Also, aside from a select few, any dvd not anamorphically enhanced doesn't look too hot, thankfully my FP has a really good deinterlacer by Farougia that cleans them up a bit.
     
  10. Ricardo C

    Ricardo C Producer

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    The ringing in TPM looks incredibly assy on large screens, as do some of the more glaring compression artifacts. Hopefully that'll be remedied with a new transfer soon.
     
  11. Don Solosan

    Don Solosan Supporting Actor

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    I'm not sure how, because it's compression artifacts that make those discs look so bad when they're blown up on a big display. Right?
     
  12. Aaron Silverman

    Aaron Silverman Executive Producer

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    Partly, yes. Another example is edge enhancement, which is intended to sharpen the image on smaller screens, but looks goofy on big screens.

    Kung Fu Hustle had a *ton* of EE, but it wasn't applied very thickly (i.e., the haloes were thin). It was very noticeable on my 55" set, but it would probably be barely visible on a 30" set.
     
  13. Ryan L. Bisasky

    Ryan L. Bisasky Second Unit

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    Alright, ill try
    Sony 57" HDTV Monitor (KP-57WS520) rear projection
    dvd player is with component cables and is a Samsung DVD-V1000. I have the tv set to PRO and the setting to "interlaced" (the three choices are interlaced, progressive or cinemagic)
    I have been fooling with calibration for the past week or so to see what looks best to me, but I haven't yet bought one of those professional calibration kits.
    hope that helps.
     
  14. Ravi K

    Ravi K Supporting Actor

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    Don't they filter the image more so that they can encode at a lower bitrate without compression artifacts?
     
  15. Brent M

    Brent M Producer

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    I too would like to see the "assy" transfer of Episode I brought up to the level of the Episode II and III DVDs. Hopefully we won't have to wait until 2007 for this to be done, but something tells me that probably will be the case. [​IMG]
     
  16. David Ruiz

    David Ruiz Second Unit

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    Compression artifacts can be horrible if severe, but how many DVDs have severe compression artifacts? Not many. Crappy transfers (at least in my opinion) are crappy because they have too much edge enhancement. EE can DESTROY a DVD. On a large screen, it can look very, very un-natural and gives everything a fake look to it.

    As a DVD reviewer, I take away more points when there is EE than when there are compression artifacts.
     
  17. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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    The Fellowship of the Ring - No, it doesn't look like crap, but it is probably my biggest dissapointment since I got my projector a couple of months ago. The picture is downright fuzzy, if it were out of focus. What's frustrating this had and continues to be touted as a reference picture quality. it might look like that on a smaller display, but I would think even on your average RPTV the lack of detail would be obvious? I nearly started a thread on this topic, but ran a search instead a found a few references to the fuziness. Still, by and large, FOTR is STILL considered reference quality. Weird.

    Infocus 4805 (DLP), El cheapo Magnavox DVD and blackout cloth, 96", 12ft away.

    --
    H
     
  18. Ravi K

    Ravi K Supporting Actor

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    Are all 3 LOTR films fuzzy? Were they filtered because they had so much on them? DD, DTS, 4 commentaries.
     
  19. Bruce Hedtke

    Bruce Hedtke Cinematographer

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    The only one I've seen (or at least, remember) was The Smokers. Aside from just being a generally bad movie, it looked at times like it was a streaming video playing over a dial-up connection. Just horrible, horrible quality.

    I can't think of any "high profile" releases that look like crap. Some you can tell were filtered far more than others, but most are at least at the "watchable" level.

    Bruce
     
  20. Aaron Silverman

    Aaron Silverman Executive Producer

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    The Quiet Man, an Artisan special edition of a classic film with nice special features, looks like it was dubbed from a VHS tape that had been watched 100 times. No joke!
     

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