dvd/tv questions about the black lines.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Todd smith, Apr 12, 2002.

  1. Todd smith

    Todd smith Supporting Actor

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    O.K. I just went tv shoping for a television to watch dvd's on with my upcoming system. I cant justify a hdtv with my budget (7-800.00) I am planning on either getting a flat or regular 32" with component out. Here is my confusion. I noticed looking at the dvd's that a good majority of them are in widescreen mode. Does this mean that they ONLY do widescreen mode? The guys there told me the majority of dvd's have ONLY widescreen mode. If this is true, that is crazy. So in order to not have the black lines on top and bottom you have to own a $$$$$$$tv with widescreen mode? I then noticed some of the tv's have v-compression (16x9). How much does this actually help (if possible, be specific)? Please tell me that I am mistaken and these dvd's have a regular screen size option for people who cant afford these $$$$tv's. I really dislike those black lines.
     
  2. Tony Mc

    Tony Mc Stunt Coordinator

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    Todd,

    Read the post right below yours, titled "To 16:9 OR NOT to 16:9. What is the answer? ".

    Hopefully, the answers in that post will answer your questions.
     
  3. Bruce Hedtke

    Bruce Hedtke Cinematographer

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    Todd,

    Not to burst your bubble, but even 16x9 televisions display black bars. A film with a 2.35/1 Aspect Ratio will still need to incorporate black bars to keep the film as a 2.35/1 ratio. Once you get beyond the 1.85/1 Ratio, the black bars will start appearing, growing larger as the Aspect Ratio grows. I don't know why you hate black bars, they are there to preserve the picture the way it is intended to be seen. (If you believe it is covering parts of the film, rest assured, it isn't covering anything you weren't meant to see).

    Bruce
     
  4. Todd smith

    Todd smith Supporting Actor

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    Thanks for the replys. Well I guess I should now ask should I stretch my budget for a 32 inch tv so it can incorporate a true squeeze mode? What exactly does the 16/9 squeeze mode do for dvd's? Does it reduce the size of the black lines on top and bottom? I will be watching a fair amount of dvd's so what do you guys think? I appreciate the help as I am sure you could tell I am very green as far as home theatre knowledge.
     
  5. Dave Schofield

    Dave Schofield Second Unit

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    Todd,

    16x9 compression "squeezes" the scan area of a standard 4x3 screen into a 16x9 box. It simply allows for a slightly better resolution on 16x9 material.

    If you don't like the black bars buy the Pan&Scan discs or, better yet, get the VHS tapes. You cannot 'trick' a player or tv into diminishing the size of the black bars without either cutting off the sides of the picture (zoom) or distorting the picture (stretch). Either way, you are better off with the pan&scan version if you absolutely demand a full-screen picture.

    Check your thread in the speakers and subwoofers forum for a few links about widescreen movies.
     
  6. VicRuiz

    VicRuiz Second Unit

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    Gosh, Please don't dare go to the Home Theater Software forum to complain about the "black lines". You will not come out alive! [​IMG]
    The black bars are there in order for you to see the entire movie. Since movies are filmed for widescreen and presented in widescreen in theaters, when a movie is modified to fit a standard (4:3) TV screen, it has to be zoomed and cropped on the sides, causing the loss of up to 40% of the picture information. That is no way to watch a movie (or 60% of the movie, if you wish).
    To see what you are missing when you watch a modified movie, visit this thread:
    http://www.hometheaterforum.com/htfo...threadid=63207
    Good luck!
     
  7. Tom Weeks

    Tom Weeks Stunt Coordinator

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    Todd, I hated the black bars at first but after nine or ten movies you won't even notice them anymore. In fact, now when I get a pan and scan (full screen) dvd by mistake, I am disappointed because I know that I am missing a sizeable portion of the picture. Honest.
     

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