DVD Recording

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Noah Kromaksian, Jan 2, 2003.

  1. Noah Kromaksian

    Noah Kromaksian Auditioning

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    I have a Sony computer and a Sony PC-100 mini DV digital camera that are connected via firewire. I have an external DVD-R drive connected via USB. My DVD capture/recording software is neoDVD Standard edition.

    Using the aforementioned setup, I transferred a mini DV tape directly to DVD-R. The final result plays fine on my home DVD player, but the quality of the video appears to be a dropoff from the original tape. Is that to be expected? Is the USB connection the weak link? Is it the software? If I were to purchase an internal DVD-R drive, would it improve the quality of the transfer? Do I need better software? Do I need both? Would I be better off with a standalone DVD recorder?

    Thanks for any help you may be able to offer.
     
  2. Daniel Shock

    Daniel Shock Auditioning

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    Well, I doubt that the usb connection to your DVD burner is the problem. The video encoder would be your problem. Remember that DV from your camera takes up about 12.5-15 GB per hour of video. The encoder has to reduce that to to fit on 4.7 GB of space on a DVD-R. I wish I could answer the question about stand alone recorders. I'll bet that there will still be a quality dropoff regardless...its just a matter of how much...
     
  3. EdR

    EdR Second Unit

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    It's most likely the encoding method/amount that the software uses. It probably uses a set amount of compression on your footage no matter how long it is, or what kind of content is being encoded.

    Some encoders will adaptively compress based on the length of the footage and/or its content (scenes that don't have much movement can be more efficiently compressed without quality loss...scenes with lots of movement need less compression to look good.) I believe this is what is called "VBR" or Variable Bit Rate - which you may know from MP3 audio encoding. But I believe these kinds of encoders are more 'pro' level and expensive.

    My only experience with DVD creation is via Apple's iDVD, which has a decent encoder, but I can see artifacts in some kinds of scenes...it uses a fixed bit-rate encoder. Apple's much more expensive DVD Studio Pro has a better compression scheme that uses VBR.

    I would look into other DVD creation software for the PC and see if there's a consensus about which offers the best encoding/price ratio.

    I don't know anything about the stand-alone recorders.
     
  4. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Actually TMPEG does a pretty good job and it's only $50 to register

    I've been very impressed with the Adobe MPEG-2 encoder included in Premiere 6.5 as well
     

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