DVD Player with progressive scan and Component Video out

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Richard_s, Nov 27, 2002.

  1. Richard_s

    Richard_s Second Unit

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    I am still not clear on this but I should be by now. SORRY. Many DVD players on the market have Progressive scan and also state they have component video out capability.

    Does this mean I can use this DVD player for both Interlaced playback like my SVCD's by using the component video out? OR is the component video out on these actually progressive scan only at 480P? Just want to make sure of two things:

    Is there any advantage to me to get a progressive scan unit?

    Since I will be playing CVD and SVCD as well as many interlaced non-progressive sources will a progressive scan DVD unit be good for me?

    My TV has the ability to play 480P, 480I and 1080I so I guess I can use anything. My TV also has a line doubler so I do not know if this makes a difference (remember reading something about this just can't remember what). BTW I have a Sony 53HS10.

    Thanks
     
  2. Kevin. W

    Kevin. W Screenwriter

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    Component is just another way to hook your DVD player to the TV. You can view Interlaced or Progressive through it. If you tv set can handle progressive then get a progressive player. It offers a better picture quality.

    Kevin
     
  3. Dennis Nicholls

    Dennis Nicholls Lead Actor

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    Interesting question - will a player properly deinterlace video from a VCD?

    If not there's really no problem getting a progressive scan unit. My Toshiba SD-6200 puts out either progressive or interlaced over the 3 connectors, just go into the menu to change back and forth. Or you could hook up an S video cable for the few times you will watch a VCD.
     
  4. Neil Weinstock

    Neil Weinstock Stunt Coordinator

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    Just to add, while component video can be either interlaced or progressive, it is the *only* common interface that handles progressive. So once you've got a progressive DVD player, component video is implied (other than possibly certain exotic exceptions.)

    As said above, if you've got a TV that can handle progressive input, you might as well get a progresive DVD player. It's not like you're paying much of a premium for it anymore.
     
  5. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

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    Richard, anyone can buy a progressive-scan player, but the progressive-scan feature does not have to be used. That is, the player can be set to put out an interlaced signal, and this can be done via a composite video (good), S-video (better), or component video (best) connection. Note that with some displays, the difference between S-video and component video output in interlaced mode can be negligible or even indiscernible. In any event, you should get a progressive-scan player and compare the picture quality in both progressive-scan and interlaced modes (using your display's line doubler in the latter case).

    The next issue for you is to find a progressive-scan player in your price range than can play VCDs and SVCDs. I don't use these discs, but maybe others here can help you in this area. What is your budget for a new player?
     
  6. Richard_s

    Richard_s Second Unit

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    Thanks All:
    I will definitely get a progressive scan unit now that I understand that I can use it both ways Progressive scan and Interlaced that is. Not sure how to determine which to use for a given DVD or other source but I am sure I will figure it out. My TV I think will automatically set itself to the source.
    Also good question about the Budget. I am looking for a multidisk if possible. $150 to $200 is my target but the less expensive the better. The following post at another forum is a description. Any help appreciated.
    http://www.vcdhelp.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=126852
     
  7. Brian Ruth

    Brian Ruth Supporting Actor

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    Toshiba SD-3800 or SD-4800 would be my recommendation. If you don't need DVD-A, the 3800 is good, if you do, then the 4800 should be fine.
    As far as I know, Toshiba has the best price-performance ratio of any major DVD player brand. I could be wrong here though - so I'd wait to hear from others first.
    EDIT: Just saw the SD-3815 on Toshiba's website. That SHOULD be about what you're looking for.
     
  8. Richard_s

    Richard_s Second Unit

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    Sorry for the newbie Question but what is DVD-A? Not sure if I need it or not.

    Thanks
     
  9. Brian Ruth

    Brian Ruth Supporting Actor

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    Richard:
    DVD-A(udio) is basically CD audio on steroids.
    More accurately, it takes the data for an album and stores it on a DVD (4.7 or 8 GB) rather than a CD (650 or 700 MB). This added space means that you can get a more accurate reproduction of the original material. Some will say it is so accurate that it is virtually indistinguishable from the original tapes.
    The whole term "DVD-Audio" is a little misleading, however - while you DO need a DVD-A compatible player to play PROPER DVD-A, MOST (I'd say 80-95%) DVD-A discs contain a DVD-Video (DD or DTS) layer or portion (or side) that can be played back on all standard DVD players (i.e. even ones without proper DVD-A decoding).
    These sections generally don't sound as good as TRUE DVD-A, but they generally sound better than the CD.
    If you DO get a DVD-A player, you have to go about connecting it properly.
    To get surround (5.1) audio from a DVD-A compatible player and disc, you need to use the analog outputs on the DVD-A and the analog inputs on your receiver - this means you have 6 cables you need to buy if you want to reproduce TRUE DVD-A Surround sound.
    This means you can't get true DVD-A surround through an optical cable (unfortunately).
    SOME DVD-A discs have a stereo layer, which (somebody correct me if I'm wrong) only requires 2 outputs and 2 inputs, if I'm not mistaken. NOT ALL DVD-A discs have this stereo layer, though. If I were to hazard a guess, I'd say 60% to 75% do. I'm unsure if this stereo layer transfers through a standard audio cable, but my hunch is that it does not.
    If you DO end up hooking a DVD-A player to your receiver with an optical cable, you will likely only be able to play the aforementioned DVD-Video layer. Kind of a bummer, but that's what you get when you have companies that are anal-retentive about copy protection.
    I hope this helps, though I fear I have left you with more unanswered questions. HOPEFULLY you'll be able to make an intelligent judgement as to whether or not you want DVD-Audio decoding on your DVD player. [​IMG]
     
  10. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Hmmm...

    Brian, I don't believe it's correct to say that the DVD-Video audio (ie. Dolby Digital or DTS) version of a DVD-Audio disc will sound better than a CD. In some instances, that may be true, but probably not in general. Both DD and DTS use lossy compression, so each channel of audio is actually inferior to CD audio. However, it might be true that the surround experience could be more enjoyable than the strictly stereo experience of CD audio--and I'm excluding DTS CDs and SACDs.

    Also, DVD-Audio is not merely pumped up CD audio, but rather pumped surround audio. DVD-Audio can be full surround w/ lossless compression at higher bitrates, ie. truly better than CD audio in every channel. But I assume that's implicit in your explanation.

    _Man_
     
  11. Chris Svencer

    Chris Svencer Stunt Coordinator

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    I am also looking for a DVD player for about that price. I have looked at JVC's XV-SA75GD and XV-S500BK, and the Phillips DVD724AT. I found them all for like $120-$130. Any suggestions? I need progressive scan, component out, and optical out. No need for DVD-A. I really like either of the JVC's but haven't heard to much about them.
    Thanks.
    -Svence
     
  12. Richard_s

    Richard_s Second Unit

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    Chris:
    Go here for reviews of a large number of units you can search by brand at the top of the page:
    http://www.vcdhelp.com/dvdplayers
    I am still looking for a multidisk unit but if I can not find one I think the best one is the DVD724AT and is the one I am going to try. Can get a 30 trial from Best Buy [​IMG]
    The JVC XV S300BK (not the s500BK you listed) is listed and looks decent. Did not read the reviews yet though.
    Give a look
     

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