DVD player questions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by John Tillman, Dec 10, 2001.

  1. John Tillman

    John Tillman Supporting Actor

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    How would a computer DVD drive give you a progressive signal? Is it the player, software or video card that would yield progressive rather than interlaced?

    Also, are computer DVD players able to play all regions?

    Thanks...
     
  2. TyC

    TyC Stunt Coordinator

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    I don't know which gives you the progressive signal.
    Computers can play all regions if you have the right software. Newer DVD-ROM drives are RPC2, meaning you can change the region 5 times. After that, the drive manufacturer must change it.
    DVD Demystified DVD FAQ - Region section (contains links to DVD-ROM region changing)
     
  3. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

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    The computer you use daily, and the monitor you look at are progressive scan.

    Try DVD Genie, it will allow you to adjust the region endlessly

    Brent L
     
  4. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    The monitor is progressive, but I doubt the players are doing really sophisticated inverse-telecine to undo the 2:3 pulldown. What they seem to do is bob and/or weave (in software) to give you full frames. PowerDVD has a specific setting for that.

    //Ken
     
  5. Matt DeVillier

    Matt DeVillier Supporting Actor

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    good software dvd players like WinDVD and PowerDVD do indeed to inverse 3:2 pulldown (or whatever the technically correct name of the week is). Since video information is stored in interlaced format on the dvd, it the the job of the decoder/video processor to do any de-interlacing. In set top players it is usually done by a separate chip; in software players it is done by their decoding engines
     
  6. Steve_Ch

    Steve_Ch Supporting Actor

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    DVD drives that are manufactured BEFORE 2000 do not have firmware/hardware regional coding, which means with DVDGenie and such you can change the region as many times as you like, now, region coding is also operating system dependent, so things may be trickier with WinXP, check with DVDdemystify page.

    Drives that are manufactured AFTER 2000 are required to have firmware/hardware regional support, which does not mean the code cannot be changed, but it does mean more complication, as software alone solution such as DVDGenie will not do the job.

    People have at times confused regional code requirement with HARDWARE/FIRMWARE regional code requirement, as I've read posts in other forums that said RC existed before 2000, but they were confused, as year 2000 is the cut over from software only to hardware/firmware implementation, and NOT the very beginning of RC.
     
  7. John Tillman

    John Tillman Supporting Actor

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    Thanks guys. I friend at work wanted to know, and I didn't have the answers.
     

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