DVD format?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mike___Walker, Jan 28, 2002.

  1. Mike___Walker

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    My recent HT upgrade includes my first DVD player, so I'm new to DVDs. I have a 27" TV. What format should I buy, Wide Screen or Full Screen? My player has the Pan & Scan feature if that matters. TIA...
     
  2. MichaelGomez

    MichaelGomez Stunt Coordinator

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    Depends on what you like. Pan and Scan stretches and then cuts out info. Usually not a good option. As for widescreen, that is the little black bars on the top and bottom. This is the best rendition of how the movie looked at the theater. On a 27" TV you loose a little bit of your picture but it is still my favorite. Some DVDs come with a Standard, which is where they cut the stuff for you.
     
  3. Colin Dunn

    Colin Dunn Supporting Actor

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    In my opinion, widescreen is the only way to go. The only exception: When a movie was filmed in the 1.33:1 aspect ratio of the TV screen.

    The pan-and-scan process chops off the sides of the picture. This can greatly alter the composition of the shot, and often will leave entire characters out of the shot.

    Additional pans are also added that weren't in the original film, which can disrupt the flow of scenes.

    It is true that the letterbox framing for widescreen doesn't use the entire display space of the TV. However, the framing/composition and flow of the film are preserved intact.

    Just about everyone here strongly prefers to keep the film intact - it's a matter of artistic integrity that takes precedence over using every square inch of screen space. Now you know why HT fanatics want big screens or projection systems - to get the impact of a large picture AND keep the film intact.
     
  4. Bill Catherall

    Bill Catherall Screenwriter

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    Don't worry about the "smaller" image of widescreen movies on your 27" TV. I have a 27" TV as well and you get used to it. If your TV is properly calibrated then the black bars will virtually disappear (because they'll really be black instead of grey).
    Retaining the original picture proportion is critical to every film in order to preserve the director's intent when framing the scene. Much more important than filling your screen. When a photographer takes a picture they don't just point and shoot, they take careful consideration of the framing (where things are positioned in the frame and what is shown). The same goes with cinematography. After a while you'll learn to love those black bars.
    AND later when you upgrade to a widescreen TV (because it's inevitable [​IMG] ) you won't have to repurchase all your DVDs. Remember that the movie is more important than the TV. Pan and scan or full frame (open matte) transfers change the movie into something the director did not intend to be seen.
     
  5. Denward

    Denward Supporting Actor

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    Mike needs to be put on HTF double secret probation for even considering P&S[​IMG]
    Honestly, you won't find a more unanimous opinion on HTF than P&S sucks and OAR (original aspect ratio) is the way to go. As others have said, it's the only way to preserve the filmmaker's vision of the movie. From what little history I know, most/all movies made before TVs became commonplace were shot in the 4:3 (aka 1.33:1) aspect ratio. When TVs were introduced, they also used 4:3. Movie theater attendance dropped. One of the ways theaters tried to compete was to introduce wider screens and to this day almost all movies use some form of widescreen to better fill our natural field of vision. I've heard that the late Stanley Kubrick preferred 4:3 but studio and theater pressures forced him to release movies in a wider aspect ratio. Some HTFers will buy Kubrick movies in 4:3, even though that's not how it was presented in theaters.
    The bottom line is look for OAR, which may be 1.33:1, 1.85:1, 2.35:1, etc.
     
  6. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  7. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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  8. Brian Johnson

    Brian Johnson Supporting Actor

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    Ok. I've been looking for a thread that was somewhat related to what I am looking to ask .

    So. Here it goes

    I have a 32 inch 4:3 tv. My dvd player has the options of widescreen,letterbox,& P&S. I know what pan & scan does and most of my movies are in widescreen.

    SO. which option on my dvd player do I want to use to get the whole widescreen image. I noticed last night with Starship Troopers which is 1.85:1 that in widescreen mode it almost completely filled the screen. When I put it in letterbox i got the 'black bars'

    My dvd also has a 'screen fill' which if turned on will take the widescreen image & stretch it to fill the screen removing black bars, however it often distorts the image.
     
  9. nolesrule

    nolesrule Producer

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  10. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  11. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    here's a nice link from the digital bits that explains the whole widescreen thing:
    http://www.thedigitalbits.com/articl...reenorama.html
    it clearly and graphically shows what happens when you do pan and scan. if you care at all about seeing what the director intended, you'll be an instant convert. that i promise!
     
  12. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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  13. Mike___Walker

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    Widescreen for Dummies, just what I need [​IMG]
    Thanks everyone for the info. I'm planning on upgrading the TV portion of my HT in the near future, so I was wanting to buy the WS formats. I jsut wasn't sure what I'd lose out on with the 27" TV. I think I'm clear on the subject now, thanks!
     
  14. Victor Y

    Victor Y Agent

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    I have the phillip 4:3 aspect HD ready TV and the TV automatic get into the widescreen mode when it detect progressive signal from DVD player. Can that be turn off or should I get another DVD player to scale the image to correct aspect ratio. I am watching Wizard of Oz last night and the picture look fat.
     
  15. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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  16. Victor Y

    Victor Y Agent

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    I konw that, what's the solution. New dvd player?
     
  17. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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  18. Seth Paxton

    Seth Paxton Lead Actor

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    No Victor, you don't need a new player. There are many work arounds.
    Your DVD Player probably has an "Auto" mode for the progressive output. In this mode the player sees if a disc is ANAMORPHIC or not, and will NOT send out a progressive signal to the TV if the video source is not ANAMORPHIC. That way you won't get 4:3 stretched.
    Another method if the progressive output is hardwired (very uncommon now) is to also hook up the S-Video output to your TV from the player. Then you can switch to that for 4:3.
    In both cases you are losing the progressive scan for non-anamorphic images. And it's not just 1.37 stuff like Oz. Things like the Abyss which are non-anamorphic will also be stretched out since they are LBXed images on a 4:3 "palette", meaning the picture is a 4:3 image with the movie image LBXed in it.
    Now, your player MAY also have another option but it sounds like it doesn't, and that would be if you put it in "I have a widescreen TV" mode the player might ADD black bars to the side. I have a JVC that does this and it's becoming more common. That way you get a progressive 4:3 image.
     
  19. Victor Y

    Victor Y Agent

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    Thank you, guys.

    I try the S-Video route and it work but without the sound since I am currently still using the TV for sound. I guess I have to find an audio spliter to split the sound from my player into 2 and hookup to the TV.

    The picture with the S-Video is definitely not as sharp. I am thinking to return the player to BB and buy another one with scaling/zooming features.

    I have another question regarding HDTV signal. From what I read not all HDTV/DTV content is in widescreen mode. Is that mean that same thing will happen to 4:3 aspect ratio TV program like a football game? The football players will look extra, extra wide.
     
  20. Brian Johnson

    Brian Johnson Supporting Actor

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    Sorry if I take it off subject. But was following up a previous post. Ok, now I know to put my dvd into letterbox mode. If I do this on my 4:3 am I getting the whole widescreen image(basically not cutting anything off?)

    And if I am, I have a 'screen fit' button, by filling the screen with the picture in letterbox mode am I still getting the whole picture? It sort of distorts the image, but fills the screen. On some dvd's in letterbox mode I get 4 inches of bars on top & bottom. Some I get 2 inch bars.
     

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