DVD Component Video via A/V Receiver or Direct to TV?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by David Glenn, Oct 8, 2002.

  1. David Glenn

    David Glenn Second Unit

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    This Saturday I'll be taking delivery on my KP57WV700 RPTV. [​IMG] I used to do my s-video switching through my Receiver (DA5ES). I've never used Component Video before so I'm not sure if what I'm asking even makes sense.
    How much is lossed by connecting my dvd component video through my receiver versus going directly to my RPTV?
    I basically need to know how many component cables I need to get.
    Thanks in advance for your response.
     
  2. Jed M

    Jed M Cinematographer

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    David, congratulations on the new tv. [​IMG]
    I do not know Sony's specs off hand but I would imagine it can pass 480p with no problem and probably 1080i. I have an Outlaw 950 which is rated at 45 MHz, which is almost conservative these days, and it passes 1080i perfectly, at least to my eyes. Just remember if you use the receiver to switch make sure you buy an extra component cable to hook from the receiver to the tv. Good luck with your new investment, its gonna be a keeper.
     
  3. David Glenn

    David Glenn Second Unit

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    Jed,

    So your saying there should be no loss in picture quality when connecting through my receiver?

    Thanks for the kind words and the advice.
     
  4. Jed M

    Jed M Cinematographer

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    David, you are going to hear opinions that claim that you should never use a receiver to switch video at all, no matter the bandwidth, because it is creating an unnecessary step for the signal which could theoretically cause loss in pq. I basically say that if my eyes and science back me up then I am fine with it. Give it a try and find out what camp you are in. I personally don't think you will see any picture loss, but believe it or not, I have been wrong before. [​IMG]
    PS and you're welcome.
     
  5. Brent Hutto

    Brent Hutto Supporting Actor

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    If the component switches in the receiver have plenty of bandwidth and you use good-quality cables that aren't too long and the receiver doesn't introduce any noise into the signals it's switching then it shouldn't make any difference at all.

    However, if you don't need the switching for some particular reason, then don't use it. Does your new TV have too few component inputs? If not, I can't imagine why you'd want to introduce any possibility at all for loss of picture quality even if it's probably negligable. If for no other reason, the direct connection saves you $50 or so worth of cables.
     
  6. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    I always connect directly to the display. Even if the loss were theoretical, that's enough for me.
     
  7. David Glenn

    David Glenn Second Unit

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    Well, here are the specs for my RPTV:

    7 A/V inputs, including:

    4 composite video (3 rear, 1 front)
    3 S-video (2 rear, 1 front)
    2 rear-panel wide-bandwidth component video
    (compatible with 1080i/720p/480p/480i signals)
    DVI HDTV input with HDCP copy protection

    Looks like I should go direct to the display, however I am going to compare/try using the receiver just to satisfy my curiosity.

    Thanks again for all the feedback.
     
  8. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    David: you can run component cables straight to the TV AND run SVideo through the receiver. This way you can keep the system simple to operate for the family, but you can take the extra step to flip the TV to see the component input when you want.

    Note: Are you running ordinary component video, or progressive/HD signals?

    A report came out last year that said while many receivers would switch component video, only a few could pass HD signals without messing the higher frequency signals:

    Component Video: 4 Mhz max
    Progressive Video: 12 Mhz max
    HD Video: 35 Mhz max

    So before you consider running progressive through your receiver, make sure it is a later model that says something like "HD switchable" or "High Bandwidth".

    Hope this helps.
     
  9. David Glenn

    David Glenn Second Unit

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    Thanks Bob.
    I have the Sony DA5ES A/V Receiver . I purchased it last year so I'm assuming I'm good to go.
    Initially, I'll be using my Toshiba 4700 Progressive Scan DVD Player. I'm currently considering getting in on a group buy for either the Panasonic DVDRP91K or the Sony DVPNS999ES. I'm also considering the old DVP-S9000ES or the new Sony Progressive Scan 300+1 Mega Changer.
    In any case, I didn't see the bandwidth specs you mentioned in the crutchfield description (link above). Can anyone tell me if my A/V Receiver is up to snuff ("HD switchable" or "High Bandwidth")?
    I can't say this enough... Thank you for taking the time to respond.
     
  10. Jed M

    Jed M Cinematographer

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    David, it should say something in the very back of your manual where it has all of the intimidating looking specs. Look for the video section and it should list the bandwidth for component along with s-video and composite. Also, I did a quick search and I could not find Sony's manuals online but it does say "HD Component Video Switching" here on the Sony website: http://www.sel.sony.com/SEL/consumer...rs/index.shtml
    Another plus with Sony is that they have discrete codes for their remotes which makes it easier to switch inputs. If you have a pronto or something that can download codes from the internet you can hit a button to go directly to video 5 and a button to go back to video 2 instead of having to cycle through all the inputs every time. It also makes it a breeze for doing macros. There was a time in my life where I would not consider buying brands that didn't have discrete codes but then I realized I was missing out on way too much, but its always a major plus when they do. Good luck.
     
  11. David Glenn

    David Glenn Second Unit

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    Thanks again Jed. I have to check my manual if I can find it in my filing cabinet.

    Yeah, i can't stand toggling through my video inputs. I have a Home Theater Master MX-500 remote. I'm not sure if I can download codes. I'll have to do a little research at remotecentral.com. I've kept putting off fully utilizing my universal remote. After I finish hooking up my RPTV, I'll have to give efficiently setting up my remote a high priority.
     

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