Dvd Audio ??

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brad M, Jul 11, 2002.

  1. Brad M

    Brad M Second Unit

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    So I'm in Best Buy looking around when I run across a new section in their dvd area. They have added tons of new audio dvds. I looked at some of the titles and would like to hear what some of them sound like. The only video I have in DD is Barenaked Ladies "Pinch Me" on the Total Movie dvdand it sounds just plain awsome on my system. I do not know ANYTHING about these types of discs. I'm only guessing the term "audio dvd" and did a search that turned up over 7,000 theads. Help!

    Does anyone know if I can I pick up one of these and expect it to play on my JVC? Also, I'm a rock & roll kind of guy. I like Van Halen, Aerosmith & new stuff like P.O.D. Do you guys recommend any titles? Should I stay away from it?
     
  2. MikeEckman

    MikeEckman Screenwriter

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    Yes, DVD-Audio discs WILL play on a DVD-Video player, however, you will be listening to it in Dolby 5.1 rather than the super 96KHz mega-awesome new type of audio format they have now. You will also not be able to access some special features like commentaries (if included) that DVD-Audio players can play.
     
  3. John Geelan

    John Geelan Screenwriter

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    Try the Metallica/Black album on for size. That one sounds great even on a Dolby Digital 5.1 setup.

    If you like that then maybe you will eventually trade up to a DVDA player.

    JohnG
     
  4. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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  5. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    DVD-A, and SACD appeal to a different audience that finds MP3 unacceptable for enjoyable and critical listening of music. Is it a niche only format? Perhaps. Is there a law of diminishing returns, only one's pocket book and ears can determine that.

    Me, I think it offers not only higher fidelity of the musical source (Sidenote: Is the 44.1KHz sampling rate good enough nowadays, for many who can tolerate MP3s, the answer is a staggering YES!, but for those who appreciate the finer resolution of music, especially in the mid to upper frequencies of the musical source, the newer higher resolution rewards those who embrace the new higher fidelity that DVD-A and SACD offer), but the opportunity to sample surround music mixes as well. Some people loathe surround music mixes (always preferring to be the audience, and not surrounded by the musicians/singers), and I understand that (which is why a 2-channel mix would keep them happy while the surround music enthusiasts gets to have their cake and eat it too with higher audio fidelity.

    I have DVD-A compability, but only one DVD-A, but that simply due to the small selection of DVD-A that don't really appeal to my musical taste, or I don't feel the desire to buy the DVD-A at this time. What I heard of my one DVD-A was a bit on the different side, but not so wretchedly bad that I've sworn off the surround music mixes completely because it's still relatively a new mode for mixing music, and I think recordings have to be imagined from the beginning to get the most out of the surround music format to fully immerse the listener in the musical listening experience while not alienating them by being so distractingly foreign at the same time.

    From a purely marketing standpoint, the 5.1 channel recordings are a tough sell simply because music is easily enjoyable with just 2 channels. For this reason alone, I consider both DVD-A and SACD to be niche products, but as prices go down, it's not unimaginable to think that DVD-capable walkmans and car stereos will be affordable, and a more attractive option for those wanting a bit more resolution in their music (especially 2-channel mixes), while maintaining backwards compatibility with their investment in redbook CDs. Even if the DVD-capable car deck or walkman wasn't used for DVD-A or SACD, I think it'd kick ass to be able to burn a DVD-R/+R/RW/etc with your musical collection (ripped via MP3 or CDA) and have a musical jukebox on one single DVD-R/+R/RW/etc.

    Should you rush out and ditch your DVD only player for a DVD-A player? Each one of us has to make that decision for themselves after considering the good and bad points. But if you're in the market for a new DVD player, it might not be a bad idea to buy something that allows you access to the new musical formats if you're inclined to enjoy either higher resolution audio reproduction or multi-channel musical mixes that DVD-A and SACD offer.
     
  6. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Brad,

    The Barenaked Ladies "Maroon" DVD-Audio is cool.

    DVD-A sounds awesome on a DVD-A player, OK on a DVD-V player in Dolby Digital. OK may be good enough for you, it is for many; it's not for me and many others.
     
  7. MikeEckman

    MikeEckman Screenwriter

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  8. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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  9. Felix Martinez

    Felix Martinez Screenwriter

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    My $.02

     
  10. Mark_Waldrep

    Mark_Waldrep Stunt Coordinator

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    I don't really have time to go into all of the things that come to mind as I read the preceding thread...but here's the foremost among them...

    The audio fidelity of a recording is established at the time that the musicians are placed in front of the microphones and piped onto a recording device. The holy-grail for audiophiles seems to be the sound of "analog" and it's true that the two track masters of thousands of recordings have been the best that things could sound for many years. I had the honor of remastering the "Will the Circle Be Unbroken" record made thirty years ago directly to 2 track. The analog tracks sound incredible and were loveingly transfered at 96 kHz/24 bits and 44.1 kHz/16 bits for the CD version. But the plan fact remains that the "fidelity" of the two track masters pales in comparison to tracks that I have recorded of two members of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band performing with a similar ensemble. In the new recording, we were able to capture all of the instruments and vocals using stereo miking techniques at 96 kHz/24 bits...that translates to greater dynamic range and signal to noise ratio and vastly improved accuracy of the frequencies that we can hear. The 30 year old analog master made at 30 ips has a signal to noise ratio of about 55-60 dB (or roughly equivalent to about 10 bits of a digital word!) and a frequency response up to about 18 kHz....that's the best that analog could do in 1971.

    Think of the visual this visual analogy...if you take one of your 8mm home movies from 1959 and did a digital telecine to HD at 1080i and displayed it on the latest hidefinition plasma screen would it look like the 8mm original or like a new production done with state-of-the-art cameras and lighting? The answer is obvious...this is the same thing that is happening to audio remastering onto SACD or DVD-Audio...

    My point is that resolution is relative...of course, we want to hear audio as close to the master as possible. Analog transfered to SACD or 96 kHz/24 bit PCM can sound as good as the master but no better! New recordings made to DSD or hiRes PCM brings the experience to another plane altogether...it does make a difference.
     
  11. Al B. C

    Al B. C Supporting Actor

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    Finally a reasonable explanation!
    Thanks Mark. [​IMG]
     
  12. Lee Scoggins

    Lee Scoggins Producer

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    Real Name:
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  13. Brad M

    Brad M Second Unit

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    Wow. I just got an education.

    Thanks for the information. I guess I'll steal the checkbook from my wife and pick up one this weekend and judge for myself.

    Thanks again.
     
  14. Brian Burgoyne

    Brian Burgoyne Second Unit

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    Brad,
    You want an education? Wait til Lee and John Kotches start debating. If you can follow that, you might as well apply to MIT.[​IMG]
     
  15. John Kotches

    John Kotches Cinematographer

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    Brian,
    I can't speak for Lee's educational background, mine doesn't come anywhere near MIT, although I did visit the MIT and Harvard campuses a few years back when I was working out of an office in Boston.
    I'm not degreed in a technical area. Like Mark Waldrep, I majored in music, with "technical field" minors of mathematics and physics. The minors were easy to pick up -- my first 2.5 years of school I was a dual major in Physics and Music. Music won. Knowing what I know now, Physics should have won [​IMG]
    Regards,
     
  16. Doug_B

    Doug_B Screenwriter

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    My current interest in the hi-rez formats revolves around obtaining the best quality source material available for material in which I am interested. Thus, my motivation is largely geared towards replacing a lot of my favorite redbook CDs with noticeably better versions, whether those versions happen to be redbook remasters or SACD/DVD-A encodings. If I know that I have a fair or poor redbook CD quality-wise, then an SACD/DVD-A/remaster redbook is an attractive purchase upgrade for me. I extend this thinking to material I don't yet have as well. Summing these two together on the hi-rez side of it gave me enough justification to pursue a high-rez player(s) (will eventually get a universal player; currently own SACD player). With such players in hand, any new material that comes out in hi-rez is a small markup (IMO) relative to redbook, so I'll always go in the hi-rez direction, with no regard as to whether the hi-rez version is markedly better than the redbook version.

    Doug
     
  17. Brian Burgoyne

    Brian Burgoyne Second Unit

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    John,
    It's all Greek to me! I have a master's in the pseudo science of psychology. The only thing we can agree on is that the dog will salivate when he hears the can opener.[​IMG]
    My daughter is going off to college to major in music. I often drove their bus to choir and band competetions and was interested in the acoustics of the various halls they performed in. I am trying to encourage her to take a class or two in the "physics of acoustics?" What is the correct term for that?
    Back to the original post. I'm a mid-fi kind of guy with a Toshiba 4700 dvd-a player and no bass management yet. The moment I played my first dvd-a disc I was amazed at the sound. I have since bought about 20-30 discs and am still amazed at the sound. I have thought about getting a pioneer elite 47 combo player so I could venture into SACD, especially since I heard they released a Stevie Ray Vaughn disc! The 2 channel purists can continue to be set in their ways. The which is better SACD or DVD-A people can continue to argue. But I'm gettin' older by the minute so I'm just gonna enjoy what is available without getting all hung-up about it.
     
  18. John Kotches

    John Kotches Cinematographer

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    Brian,

    Probably more interesting will be something along the lines of "The Physics of Music" or some similarly titled course.

    As someone who's a psychologist, you can probably answer this one. Aren't the same regions of the brain engaged for music and mathematics?

    Regards,
     
  19. Brian Burgoyne

    Brian Burgoyne Second Unit

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    Some research coming out of University of California Irvine is showing that listening to music enhances spatial reasoning which improves mathematical functioning. There is a lot of interplay among regions of the brain across the corpus collosum when math and music are engaged.

    There is also research that shows that musicians may have more grey matter than non-musicians. (I guess as long as they don't kill their brain cells with drugs).

    So maybe that's why you are so smart...
     
  20. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

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