DVD analog sound over digital coax cable?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Susana Anderton, Nov 3, 2001.

  1. Susana Anderton

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    I've got a question.
    I just got a new Denon 2802 receiver. I connected an Apex 600-a DVD player (I know, it's crappy) with an S-Video cable and a digital coax cable ONLY. I put an audio CD and an SVCD into it, and they both played out the receiver. How is the sound from these non-digital sources coming out the digital coax cable? Does the DVD player create the data stream on the fly, or do I not understand they way this stuff works?
    Thanks
     
  2. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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  3. Sean Conklin

    Sean Conklin Screenwriter

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    Welcome to the HTF Susana,
    CD and SVCD are actually digital! Your player reads the info and sends it through the Digital Coax as 1's and 0's (bitstream) where it is then processed by your receiver's DAC (Digital Analog Converter) then amplified and sent to the speakers.
    If you were to send the info through through regular analog jacks, your player would read AND process the information using it's own internal DAC then send the processed info to the receiver, bypassing the receiver's DAC.
    So, if you use the Digital coax your receiver processes.
    If you send it through the analog RCA jacks your DVD player processes.
    See what I mean?
    Ok I hope that helped!
    **EDIT** It took me so long to type this, Saurav beat me to it! Someone always does!
    ------------------
    Sean
    "I was thinking of the immortal words of Socrates who said.......I drank what?"
    [Edited last by Sean Conklin on November 03, 2001 at 06:50 PM]
     
  4. Susana Anderton

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    Thanks for the info, guys.
    2 more questions:
    1. My DVD player setup has 2 digital options for Audio Output:
    SPDIF/RAW
    SPDIF/PCM
    What's the difference? Which one should I use?
    2. If I want to record from my DVD player to my S-Video VCR then would I also have to connect RCA audio cables from my DVD player? I guess I could try it, but I have to figure out how to do it first. Man this receiver is complicated!
    Thanks
    [Edited last by Susana Anderton on November 03, 2001 at 07:00 PM]
     
  5. PaulKH

    PaulKH Second Unit

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    1. Good question [​IMG] My HDTV box has a similar option so I'd like to know the answer too. My receiver doesn't seem to care which option I pick.
    2. As far as I know, most (all?) DVDs have macrovision copy protection, so you won't be able to record anything off those DVDs to your S-Video VCR, sorry.
    > Man this receiver is complicated!
    Welcome to home theater. I'm convinced PCs and even computer networks are simpler than home theater at this point!
     
  6. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Susana,
    SPDIF is merly a cable connection refrence SPDIF or Sony-Phillips
    Digital Interface as the name implies is a TosLink (Fiber) or
    Digital Coaxial connection between components as oposed to
    analog.
    PCM and RAW are both digital music storage formats. PCM is
    Pulse Width Control Modulation if I am not mistaken and RAW
    is Raw Audio Wav Format, again if I am not mistaken.
    I think most people would say use PCM over RAW if you can
    select between the 2.
    If any of my info is incorrect someone will step in and
    correct me I am sure [​IMG]
    And yes it does get confusing!
    ------------------
    [​IMG]
    Brett DiMichele
    My Home Theater Site!
    [email protected]
     
  7. Susana Anderton

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    >> 2. As far as I know, most (all?) DVDs have macrovision copy protection, so you won't be able to record anything off those DVDs to your S-Video VCR, sorry.
     
  8. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  9. Karim Nogas

    Karim Nogas Stunt Coordinator

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  10. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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  11. Karim Nogas

    Karim Nogas Stunt Coordinator

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    Sorry Saurav, my question wasn't clear.
    What I'm confused about is why there is any converstion at all if you are using a digital source and only digital connections, regardless of whether it takes place at the CD player or receiver.
    ------------------
    You don't need a centre channel.
    [Edited last by Karim Nogas on November 04, 2001 at 06:13 PM]
     
  12. Steve Daniels

    Steve Daniels Stunt Coordinator

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    Karim,
    I can't speak for Saurav, but I think I can answer your question.
    The reason that the signal needs to be converted from digital to analog is because we can't hear in zeros and ones.
    Inside the receiver, the digital signal is converted to an analog one at the (end of the) pre-amp stage. This analog signal is sent to the amplifier section where it is amplified and sent out through the speaker outputs.
     
  13. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    if you sent a "digital" signal through an amplifier and out
    to the speakers all you would hear would be clicks or thuds.
    The digital information has to be converted back to analog
    and then amplified and sent to the speaker so that it can
    reproduce the sound. Binary code played through a speaker
    would sound like morse code, not music [​IMG]
    ------------------
    [​IMG]
    Brett DiMichele
    My Home Theater Site!
    [email protected]
     
  14. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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    I guess that answers your question?
    Sound is analog. It is recorded as an analog electrical signal, converted to digital and stored on the CD. When you play a CD, the digital information (i.e., 1s and 0s) is read from the CD, and has to be converted back to the original analog signal that was initially recorded. This analog signal is now sent to your speakers, which produce the sound.
    If you'd like to know how the process works in more detail, you could try dearching google.com for "digital audio basics". I've seen some sites on the web which do a pretty good job of explaining the various steps involved - sampling, quantization, encoding, regeneration, and so on.
     
  15. Vin

    Vin Supporting Actor

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  16. Karim Nogas

    Karim Nogas Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the replies.
    Sorry for the dumb question.
    ------------------
    You don't need a centre channel.
     

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