DVD-A vs DAD

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mike Broadman, May 13, 2002.

  1. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

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    Folks, I was curious as to what the technical difference is between DVD-A and DAD. Correct me if I'm wrong, but are they not both PCM 24/96? What does DVD-A do that regular DVD sound does not? Thanks.

    NP: King Crimson, Moles Club, Bath, CD
     
  2. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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    DVD-A uses Meridian Lossless Packing (MLP) encoding to provide up to 192kb/24bit PCM quality multi-channel audio.

    DAD provides up to 96/24 PCM, I believe 2 channel only.

    DVD-A provides higher quality multi-channel audio but only plays on DVD-A compatible players (although many discs sport PCM, Dolby Digital or DTS tracks for compatibility with standard DVD-Video players), where DAD discs should play in most/all DVD players since they just use a standard PCM track.

    KJP
     
  3. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

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    Thanks Kevin.

    Can anyone throw me a link that goes into some more detail?
     
  4. Craig F

    Craig F Second Unit

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    I don’t have a link handy that describes DAD, but here is some more elaboration.
    DAD is not really a format. The DVD-Video spec allows for 2 channel PCM at 96kHz/24-bit. DAD is just a DVD-Video that utilizes this.
    On the other hand DVD-Audio IS a format and has a different spec. DVD-Audio allows the following sample rates (kHz) 44.1, 48, 88.2, 96, 176.4, 192 at bit depths of 16, 20, 24. The 2 highest sample rates are limited to 2 channel stereo. The lower sample rates allow up to 6 full range channels. As previously noted, DVD-Audio can use MLP compression which is a lossless compression unlike DD and DTS.
    For more info on DVD-Audio:
    http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...o-11-2001.html
     

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