DVD 16:9 on a standard 4:3 TV

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Matthew S, Dec 24, 2001.

  1. Matthew S

    Matthew S Auditioning

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2000
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    [​IMG] I just purchased my first DVD player the other day, a Panasonic RV-31 which I bought based on the numerous reviews and suggestions from you folks...thanks.
    My question is: although the player lets you adjust for a 4:3 TV, (I'm using a few year old Panny CT27SF11S)if the DVD is in 16:9 anamorphic format, thats it, you are "stuck" watching the DVD with 4" black bars above and below the picture. I know that I can buy DVD's in eather format, but when I rent form Blockbuster and Hollywood Viveo, their choices are almost exclusively widescreen.
    I suppose that short of buying a widescreen TV now, I'll have to adjust to this format on my standard TV. Don't get me wrong, the picture quality is superior and the 5.1 sound is amazing.
    Is this the way it is, or am I missing something??
    Thanks and Happy Holidays!
    Matthew
     
  2. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 1998
    Messages:
    3,632
    Likes Received:
    5
    A widescreen TV has an aspect ratio of 1.78:1, so any film wider than that will still have some visible black bars.

    It just comes down to whether you want to see the film with it's original frame composition or butchered to fit your TV screen.
     
  3. Lou Sytsma

    Lou Sytsma Producer

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 1998
    Messages:
    5,838
    Likes Received:
    344
    Real Name:
    Lou Sytsma
    Hi Matthew. Welcome to the forum!

    Do a search on OAR(Original Aspect Ratio) and it will answer your questions.

    In a nutshell a widescreen presentation will give you black bars on your TV. Widescreen presentations mimic a rectangular theatre movie screen on the more square aspect (width vs height) of a TV screen.

    This allows one to see the movie the way it is intended to be seen when it was released theatrically. Pan and scan is an attempt to fit that picture on a TV screen. Depending on the movie you could loose > 30% of the picture totalling destroying the image and intent of the picture.

    This forum mandates the presentation of movies in their original - usually widescreen but not always - format.

    Hope this helps!
     
  4. Allen Longcor

    Allen Longcor Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2001
    Messages:
    546
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just got that DVD player for christmas. Go into the menu and change the settings to 4:3 letterbox for the best widescreen picture from the player. You could use the 16:9 mode of the DVD player to fill more of the screen, but the picture looks stretched and wasn't gonna do it for me. Read through the whole manual and you should be good to go.
     
  5. Matthew S

    Matthew S Auditioning

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2000
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Allen, I played with the aspect ratio and you're right, the 16:9 stretched the heads too much. I guess I will have to get used to the "new" way to watch movies and the like. Maybe I will get a widescreen TV or 32" Wega when I grow up [​IMG]
    Matthew
     
  6. Chris PC

    Chris PC Producer

    Joined:
    May 12, 2001
    Messages:
    3,975
    Likes Received:
    1
    Like you and most people in this world of TV, I watched movies on 4:3 set for years. For me, it was a 20" TV. I experienced the same thing you are going through now adjusting to the 'black bars'. When I started to watch DVD and Laserdiscs in "letterbox" or "widescreen" I noticed how seriously little TV screen area the movies actually occupied. You will soon appreciate the full picture though, even if it is "shorter". After watching DVD's in letterbox, and then going to the movies in the theater and then back at home watching a Pan & Scan video tape, you'll forever be able to see how the "Film has been modified to fit your screen". I totally sympathize with you at your dismay with the loss of screen real estate, especially on a 27" TV. I can assure you, that you have two options.

    1) Get the biggest NTSC 4:3 TV you can afford, such as a 32 or 36" TV. I myself have a 32" TV and although the widescreens are small on the 4:3, they are more than watchable. Your next step is a widescreen HDTV.

    2) Get used to a small picture and get a widescreen HDTV when ever you can afford it later on.

    I know this sounds silly, but try to sit a tiny bit closer to the TV. Even 2 feet closer will make it nicer for you to watch the "smaller" or more accurately, the "shorter" picture for now.
     
  7. Arthur S

    Arthur S Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 1999
    Messages:
    2,568
    Likes Received:
    0
    Matthew, unfortunately, far too few movies are available in both the widescreen and 4X3 formats. The 1:78 movies aren't bad on a 4:3 but the 2:33 take away too much screen space.

    I agree with the other posters, sit closer, when you can afford it, get a 36 inch 4X3 tube. Right now, a 36 inch 4X3 tube will give you the most bang for your buck.
     
  8. MikeN

    MikeN Agent

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 1999
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    0
  9. Francois_Laliberte

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2001
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Matthew S,

    Widescreen format is PURE EVIL !!!!!! Run away if you can !

    It all started when one of my buddies told me how great movies looked on dvd's, I did not have a dvd player at the time.

    So I rented one from my local videostore to see if I would like it.

    Well I liked it but I found that the image was too small on my 27 inch Gaoo.

    So I ended up blowing $6,500 on HT equipment (16:9 Toshiba TW40X81 RPTV, etc etc) just because I wanted a dvd player.

    But you know what, it's the best friggin $6500 I ever spent in my life !

    Enjoy the hobby,
     

Share This Page