Duplex - Uh, why use two discs?

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Chris Rein, Mar 2, 2004.

  1. Chris Rein

    Chris Rein Stunt Coordinator

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    Well, I just saw that Duplex has two discs inside the case.

    One is "Widescreen with Features"

    The other is "Fullscreen"

    So, I'm trying to figure this out...the runtime on the movie is 89 minutes. Why in the hell couldn't they just put them on one disc or make it a flipper? Just doesn't make sense, especially on a movie like this. Guess I have two choices A) Sell the Fullscreen disc to some schmuck who doesn't know better or B) Use the Fullscreen version as a coaster. Either way works for me!

    The movie, after drinking a couple of beers, had a few funny moments, especially the clapper scene, the ass wiping scene and definitely the surround sound scene!
    . It wasn't great. It wasn't bad. It was just there. I guess after living in a duplex and an apartment and having noisy-ass neighbors, I can relate.

    Anyone want to take a crack at why this is two discs? [​IMG]
     
  2. rutger_s

    rutger_s Supporting Actor

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    Why two discs?

    Maybe so the DVD producers did not want to sacrifice picture quality? It may only be 89mins but two versions at 89mins plus extras sure eats up disc space. Space that could be used for a better bit-rate. Which in turn leads to a better picture.

    But I'm just quessing here. Anyone else have any theories?
     
  3. Ryan Wong

    Ryan Wong Stunt Coordinator

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    It can boost the sales.
     
  4. Jesse Skeen

    Jesse Skeen Producer

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    I HATE 2-disc sets!
     
  5. SteveK

    SteveK Supporting Actor

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    The dictionary definition of duplex is "having two parts or elements". So it couldn't really be a "Duplex" unless it had 2 DVD's. That's the real reason.

    Sorry, couldn't resist. [​IMG]

    Steve K.
     
  6. Sean Moon

    Sean Moon Cinematographer

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    Personally, I like this idea much better than seperate wide and full releases. It would cut down on customer confusion on many levels.
     
  7. Chris Rein

    Chris Rein Stunt Coordinator

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    Ah, the extras...or lack there of!

    Good theories, good smart-ass-isms [​IMG] and good conversation.

    As for picture and sound, it was pretty good in the video departmet, and okay in the sound department. Sound was fun during a few select scenes. Anyway, I was just curious as to why the two discs. Cutting down on sales-package versions is okay.

    For me, I would love for studios to make a DVD cover for Fullscreen that was all zoomed in, edges chopped and you could barely make out the title of the movie. That would be full screen. Then, for widescreen, so everything on the cover, all of the title, etc. so they can see right on the package what they're getting. LOL!
     
  8. Jesse Skeen

    Jesse Skeen Producer

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    Well, all DVDs were SUPPOSED to include BOTH versions to satisfy everyone when the format was launched, but the "foolscreen" version was usually dropped if it was a long movie or they had a lot of extras to put on the disc. The yokels at Wal-Mart complained about them black bars though, which started dual releases rather than just telling them to shut up and deal with it. (At the very least, they could just enable the auto pan-and-scan to crop the picture and be done with it.)
    I'd much rather have both versions included than have to make sure I'm getting the "right" one, or even worse not having it available at all, but it's silly to do it on 2 separate discs. Those who aren't obsessive collectors will probably sell off the disc they don't want, and I don't think the movie studio will like that.
     
  9. Matthew Chmiel

    Matthew Chmiel Cinematographer

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    Disc one, which includes the widescreen version plus extras, is a dual-layer disc.

    Disc two, which includes the "full frame" version, is a single-layer disc.

    I'm sure this method is cheaper than releasing two seperate editions of the film. This method should also be used more (by studios similar to MGM and FOX).
     
  10. RobertCharlotte

    RobertCharlotte Supporting Actor

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    I know you're kidding, but frankly, I've never understood why this idea hasn't been tried. Package the full screen version with the DVD case portrait, the widescreen with the DVD case landscape. No confusion.
     
  11. Bob clamer

    Bob clamer Supporting Actor

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    The copy I rented only had one disc in the case, widescreen with bonus features.
     
  12. Julian Lalor

    Julian Lalor Supporting Actor

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    With 1.85:1 films like this (ie films that don't have much in the way of FX shots) couldn't they just use pan and scan on the fly? This feature is not used anywhere near as often as it could be.
     
  13. Chris Rein

    Chris Rein Stunt Coordinator

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    I agree on the "all in one package" even if I would just toss out or sell the Fullscreen versions of the film if possible. I can see where studios would "might" save on additional cases and printing, but how much are they really saving? I'm sure the dual cases (with hinge or "double decker") are more expensive than the single case, and since they're printing a ton of inserts anyway (for one release or two), the cost per unit doesn't change much if at all.

    If they are redoing content on each disc, in this case Duplex (one with features, the other without and Fullscreen) wouldn't that be more cost right there? Maybe I'm looking to deep into this.

    It seems that the most logical answer here would be to reduce the "oh shit" syndromes when getting home only to find out you got the Fullscreen (or for some...dare I say Widescreen) version of the film that you simply don't want.

    And I agree that the hardware could (and should) scale on the fly for most if not all widescreen movies. It should be as easy as setting a "flag" or "trigger" on the disc menu (choose widescreen or fullscreen) that tells the player to scan widescreen material when you press that option. Then they would just need to make one disc (widescreen baby!) and let the player do all the work.

    I have to stop thinking about this! It's making me crazy! [​IMG]
     

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