Duel "Sweet Spots" Possible???

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jack Smith, Jan 17, 2002.

  1. Jack Smith

    Jack Smith Agent

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    Is it possible to calibrate the sweet spot for two large chairs positioned side-by-side? There is approximately 12-to-20 inches between the seat cushions. Right now my Radio Shack meter thingy has the sweet spot centered on me, and I am looking for a way to avoid re-setting my receiver (Denon 5800) at zero, when company is over, so the audio resembles something more of an even dispersion. Any solutions?

    -Cinepro 3k6SE1 Amp (375x6)powering FL, FR, FC

    -Cinepro 2k5II Amp (250x5)powering four surrounds

    -Denon 5800 as pre-pro

    -Samson 700 powers subs

    -Klipsch RF7, RC7, RS7, and in center position RF3 (pair)

    -SVS 46/16c pair of subs

    -bunch of other stuff...
     
  2. Jack Smith

    Jack Smith Agent

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    Sorry, I meant "dual".
     
  3. Legairre

    Legairre Supporting Actor

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    Is that 12-20" between the chairs the center? If it is the just calibrate for that empty space.
     
  4. BruceD

    BruceD Screenwriter

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    One recommended method is to try and use a figure 8 movement between the two spots, watch the SPL meter, and try to average the SPL level to the calibration level.
     
  5. ling_w

    ling_w Second Unit

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    Yes, Get the Bose 901's.

    Actually, there are processors out there that modify the front channel signals so that it produces a image with a wider sweet spot. It involves modifying the signal and creating phase differences above certain freq depending on the original source location so as to model after the human auditory system. So offset listener would still get a central image due to the phase differences between the L&R loudspeaker. This process is implemented in Meridian's Trifield mode, but it does not do 5.1, although it could easily do it.

    There are recording encoding/decoding techniques that captures and recreates that information, so the full sound in the XYZ dimension is captured and reproduced at playback. Sadly that method is rarely used in the recording or mixing of music or movies. This would be the Ambisonic recording format, which a few decoders are available (including the Meridians.) For straight 5.1, ambisionic mixers could be used so as to allow direct playback w/o the need for a decoder, but no studios are using it.
     
  6. John Gates

    John Gates Second Unit

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    Hi Jack,
    You could try experimenting with speaker placement to see what happens to the sweet spot. Try toeing in, toeing out, moving in or out from the wall, widening the stance, etc.
    Just to make sure we're talking about the same thing, I define "sweet spot" as that location where you read a coherent soundstage and have good imaging (you can't tell where the speakers are, there's just a wide soundfield painted before you with width and depth).
    Some speaker brands suffer from very narrow sweet spot as a matter of design, and no matter what you do with placement, the sweet spot won't get much wider. Amps and pre-amps can also impact this, in my experience.
    The desire for ultra-wide sweet spot was a major factor in my purchase of nOrh speakers. I'm not kidding when I say the nOrh 4.0's had an 8 foot wide sweet spot. They are awesome for HT. [​IMG]
    Hopefully, you'll be able to find that elusive combo of room and speaker placement that will give you what you're looking for. Calibrate with the SPL meter, but trust your ears for "sweet spot." [​IMG]
    John G
     
  7. MikeH1

    MikeH1 Screenwriter

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    This is the exact reason why I went with the Bipolar sound. I wanted a bipolar speaker that was very musical and found it with Mirage. I do like the pinpoint accuracy that forward radiators have but the huge soundstage/sweetspot of the Bipolars absolutely sold me. I had never heard anything like it and the more I listened the more I was convinced.
    I'm sure you have no thoughts of replacing your speakers but these might be worth a listen. If you really want a bigger soundstage then perhaps a sacrifice has to be made. Of course, explore these other options mentioned before. [​IMG]
     
  8. Thomas_Berg

    Thomas_Berg Screenwriter

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    if you face your speakers towards the walls you can reflect the music to create an exceptional soundstage.
    [​IMG]
    ling_w beat me to it.
     
  9. Drew Eckhardt

    Drew Eckhardt Stunt Coordinator

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    For two channel, you need bipolar speakers (Definitive, Mirage, etc). After escaping college, I still lacked the patience to sit still enough to fully appreciate the capabilities of direct radiators; although now I don't think I'd take the wider sweet spot along with the room/placement issues and imaging compromises.

    I'm more aural than visual (skipping glasses for far too long didn't help here - by the time I caved in, I needed to drive past street signs and turn arround), and on movies still find seating a couple feet off center acceptable with direct radiators. If that's the scope of your problem, better speaker placement might help.
     

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