Dual sub positioning?

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by kyle ^_^, Jul 13, 2004.

  1. kyle ^_^

    kyle ^_^ Agent

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    Im going to soon be running two subs in my living room. It is a 15x13 room that is all closed off except for one doorway... Whats usually the best place to put two subwoofers? Side by side? Opposite ends of one wall? Opposite corners? I was also thinking about putting one in the front right corner like i usually do, and one behind the couch?
     
  2. Robert Cowan

    Robert Cowan Supporting Actor

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    there are many different arguements on this topic. however, there are a few universals.

    side by side is not good. this will cause too much interaction. on top of eachother is an option if you can only place them in a small area.

    opposing corners is a great option, but you may have a bit of a harder time tuning them. since they are both in a corner, you get considerable room gain, and can result in boominess.

    the supposed best is either place them as you place your main speakers (behind them, or right beside the mains), OR, place them at 3/4 length of walls.

    for instance, if you have a 15' wall, place it at 11.25' down the wall in either direction. then, do the same with the other one, on the adjoining wall (the 13' wall) at 9.75'. this creates maximum output with minimum boom and minimum cancellation.

    THX says to stack subs, REL acoustics says opposing corners (but move them out until they stop booming), and "industry professionals" claim the third option.

    im getting dual subs, and i will do the third option. subs arent made to be stacked really (its not IDEAL), i cant do opposing corners, but i can put them right next to the speakers (there is a claim about high-bass imaging here too).
     
  3. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    A good idea would be to read the harman papers on sub placement. There is no "right" answer, and it's a somewhat complicated ordeal to do it right. Co-location is probably the easiest thing, though it won't smooth out response. The flipside is placing them separately can make things better if done right, or worse if done wrong.
     
  4. terence

    terence Supporting Actor

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    I found that in my HT co-locating my subs did not work to well, only after seperating them as Chris mention i acheived a smoother in room responce. My subs are in opposing corners and i will tell you there work involed. Meaning you might have to deal with phase issues to really get them dialed in right, maybe eqing them also will help. All i all i love having dual subs and can't see going back to just one but to each his on.
     
  5. Brad_See

    Brad_See Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm an electric bassist and I've heard of bass speaker cabinet companies saying that you get the greatest decibel increase by stacking cabs. I don't know the science behind it or if it carries over to HT subs but I just thought I'd throw it out there to confuse you more. [​IMG]

    brad cook
     
  6. Robert Cowan

    Robert Cowan Supporting Actor

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    the idea behind stacking is that you have minimal cancellation. so, you get the highest output.
     
  7. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Kyle,

    I once set up a pair of subs in a room virtually identical to yours (LxW) and took 1/6-octave measurements. I tried both in one corner, separated in front corners, opposing corners and asymmetrical (i.e., one centered on the long wall, the other in a corner). The results I got:

    1. Both in the same corner – Best results overall. Output was higher, response smoother, second-best extension. Stacking or co-placement is functionally the same.

    2. Front corners (short wall) – Some loss of output, response not as good, but overall performance acceptable. Response could be soothed by equalization.

    3. Opposing corners – Higher output at one peaking frequency, but lots of holes in response and reduced output everywhere else. Abysmal response overall – beyond the hope of equalization.

    4. Asymetrical – Lowest extension, but beyond that performance was almost as bad as opposing corners: Significant loss of output and again, response so bad it can’t be equalized.

    Hope this helps.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  8. Ned

    Ned Supporting Actor

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    From the Harman Kardon whitepaper.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Owen Bartley

    Owen Bartley Second Unit

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    I've heard a lot of good things about stacking, but I think it would depend on your crossover point. My crossover is set to 80Hz (lowest point on my 2802), and I have one Tempest sub in the front left corner. This leaves me definetely hearing and feeling more bass on that side. In my situation, I would add another sub on the right side of the room to attempt to even it out.

    On the other hand, if you can set your crossover lower, it might not be an issue, and you can stack them for the easiest setup, and probably most output overall.
     
  10. kyle ^_^

    kyle ^_^ Agent

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  11. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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  12. Robert Cowan

    Robert Cowan Supporting Actor

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    its interesting how many different viewpoints there are.

    the harman whitepaper is almost exactly opposite of what a lot of the "high end" companies are saying. they claim the worst possible spot is to have the subs opposing and on 1/2 length of the walls.
     
  13. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Well all one would have to do is take measurements with the sub in various positions to see which gave the best, or as best as can be, overall response. A mighty big undertaking though. In a room that size, I'd look to just get one sub that could do the job as we're not talking about a very large space.
     
  14. David Judah

    David Judah Screenwriter

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    If you don't want to take alot of measurments at different positions, I think the safest bet is to co-locate them in a corner and EQ down the large peak/s(requiring one set of measurements).

    My experience with multiple subs mirrors Wayne's.

    DJ
     
  15. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    And many others too that have taken the time to do careful measurements throughout the room.
     

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