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DTS Damage to Components (Looking for details)....

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Matthew Furtek, Jul 25, 2002.

  1. Matthew Furtek

    Matthew Furtek Stunt Coordinator

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    It is frequently mentioned that DTS tracks have the possibility of causing damage to equipment if used in an environment that is not DTS compatible. I'd like to understand more about this.

    Currently I have just the DVD player and TV setup, with DVD outputs going to TV inputs. I'm 99% sure if I switched a DTS track on, it wouldn't damage my TV because DTS requires a digital connection.

    As I understand the problem...
    If I got a non-DTS capable receiver, and hook the optical or coax out from my DVD player to it, and attempt to play the DTS track, the player is sending the DTS signal through the DD decoder? This garbage in garbage out will cause some sort of noise in the speakers and cause damage? Is this the extent of risk, or is there more to it than that.

    I'm just a curious party trying to gain some knowledge.

    Matthew Furtek
     
  2. RichardMA

    RichardMA Second Unit

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    Nonsense.
     
  3. JackS

    JackS Supporting Actor

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    If I understand your question, the possibility of outputting the raw bit stream of DTS from a non DTS receiver is probably no longer possible if it ever was in the first place. Certianly any receiver produced in the last 3 years would not allow for this just for the reasons you describe. In the very early days of DTS, I think the switch had to be made manually with some receivers You would have to be purchasing very old DTS equipment that contained the manual switch and which had the possibility of blowing tweeters if the user forgot to make the switch.
     
  4. Wyatt_Y

    Wyatt_Y Stunt Coordinator

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    Being an early DTS adopter, I always understood the problem to be sending a DTS bitstream to a DD only decoder. The DD decoder would not only output garbage but would do so at a high volume level. On early DVD players and AV receivers, DTS capability was more of an exception than the near universal standard it now is.....

    Nearly all early DD/DTS DVD's had an 'are you sure' warning when you selected DTS output. This is rarely seen on current release DVD's....

    I don't think you'd have a problem with analog output from your DVD player to TV unless....you had an older DVD player that had a built in DD decoder but no DTS decoder and were able to select DTS output on the DVD and had the DD decoder in the player trying to process it..... It was common on early DVD players with processors to only decode DD.

    Wyatt
     

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