DTS CD vs. DVD-A

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Shalen, Nov 13, 2001.

  1. Shalen

    Shalen Extra

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    Could someone explain the difference between the two. I know DVD-A is suppose to be the best, but is it that much better than DTS CD? Also, what are your opinions on the future of the two (unless that is a big debate I don't want to open up a can of worms)? I got a DVD player recently (Zenith 5201) that supports CD-R, CD-WR, and MP3, but doesn't support DVD-A. Now I'm thinking about returning it and getting one that plays DVD-A. Are there any DVD players out there that support DVD-A and MP3 that are under $300? And the final question is does anyone know of websites that have upcoming titles on DTS CD?
    Thanks
    Shalen
     
  2. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    DTS CD is pretty much a dead format as far as I'm concerned. I personally am happy with DTS CD sound quality, and don't notice a huge quality difference between DTS and DVD-A (Using the formats on Steely Dan's "Two Against Nature" DVD-A to compare). DVD-A is better, but DTS is still pretty damn good.
    ------------------
    Philip Hamm
    AIM: PhilBiker
     
  3. Jaehoon Heo

    Jaehoon Heo Stunt Coordinator

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    Technically, most DTS CD's are encoded from 44.1kHz 20 bit 5.1 channel master. Due to DTS's lossy nature(though it is least lossy of all psycho-acoustic coding), the quality of encoded DTS CD's are a little degraded from the original.
    Most of recent DVD-Audio releases use 88.2/96kHz 24 bit 5/5.1 channel master, and the same audio signal as in the master is recorded on the DVD, or losslessly compressed and recorded. It means that virtually no degradation will be made from very high-quality master. So, theoretically, DVD-Audio should be much better than DTS CD.
    However, one tricky thing is that some people may feel big or small difference while others don't, depending upon their listening experiences or their system and listening environment. The other tricky thing is that DVD-Audio's watermarking scheme may degrade the audio quality, though it is claimed to be inaudible. I think the watermarking is a bad thing, just for copy protection, and we, high-quality music fans should protest against.
     
  4. John Tillman

    John Tillman Supporting Actor

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    One possible show stopping issue for going to DVD-A or SCAD is needing six analog coax cables to port the sound to your amp/receiver (which has to have inputs for 6-channel).
    I've got a few DTS & DVD-A discs and they are all very enjoyable. I think I hear better separation or enveloping with the DVD-A. Plus the added benefit of video, pictures and lyrics.
    There was a recent thread in the hardware section where someone stated that SCAD is a better sounding format than DVD-A due to superior DAC's being used. Not an audio-file myself so do some research.
     
  5. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    The Panasonic RA60 supports both MP3 and DVD-Audio, and is available for around $230. Its a pretty good all around player. You can find my review over in the Hardware forum if you're interested.
    I've just had DVD-Audio for a little bit, and I find the quality to be outstanding. Unfortunately I can't provide any comparison between DTS and DVD-Audio yet, however I just got Eric Clapton's Reptile which has DVD-Audio 5.1 and 2 channel as well as DD and DTS. So when I get the time I plan to do some comparisons.
     
  6. Shalen

    Shalen Extra

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    Thanks for all your replys.
    John - I have a Sony STR-DE875. The website says it has "5.1-channel input for new high-resolution multi-channel audio sources such as SACD", so I take this to mean that it can handle DVD-A. Does this sound correct? Also is SCAD on a DVD? If so, can it play on any DVD Player? I have heard about it (on here) but don't know anything about it.
    Thanks again for all the replys.
    Shalen
     
  7. Keith Mickunas

    Keith Mickunas Cinematographer

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    Sony is one of the main backers of SACD, so that's why their docs only mention it, but the same connectors will work for DVD-Audio. SACD requires an SACD player, of which Sony makes most. Some of those play DVD-Video also, but not all. Pioneer currently makes a player that lists for $6000 that plays both DVD-Audio and SACD, along with DVD-Video. Also, SACDs can (but not must) have a CD compatible layer so they can be played in most CD players, but this is in standard PCM.
     
  8. Will

    Will Guest

    Most DVD-A players won't decode SACD, and most SACD players
    won't decode DVD-A (except for some very expensive players)
    so you'll need to choose which type of player, DVD-A or
    SACD, to buy.
     
  9. Jaehoon Heo

    Jaehoon Heo Stunt Coordinator

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    SACD/DVD-A capable players so far :
    Pioneer DV-AX10 : multichannel DVD-A and 2-channel SACD
    Pioneer DV-S747 :Japan/EU model, not in USA yet,
    multichannel DVD-A and multichannel SACD
    Apex AD-7701 : multichannel DVD-A and 2-channel SACD maybe
    known to have bad audio quality
    Philips SACD 2000 : multichannel DVD-A and multichannel SACD
    believed not to have DVD-V playback
    TBA 2002?
    [Edited last by Jaehoon Heo on November 14, 2001 at 11:30 PM]
     

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