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DTS by using DVD's decoder?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Tom Sullivan, Aug 2, 2001.

  1. Tom Sullivan

    Tom Sullivan Agent

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    Greetings!
    I want the DVD player to decode DTS. Can it only be done by using the six channel analog outs? Or can this be done also by using the one digital out?
    The reason I ask is I hv a JVC 723gd and a Marantz SR8000. When I set the DVD player to PCM only I only get the fronts to work and nothing out of the rear speakers when using the digital out.
     
  2. Nicholas A. Gallegos

    Nicholas A. Gallegos Stunt Coordinator

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    When the DVD player itself is doing the DTS decoding, you have to use the 6-ch. analog outputs. The player itself plays the role of both the bitstream decoder and the DAC.
    The digital output on your DVD player is simply going to output either a 2-ch. PCM signal or a undecoded DD or DTS bitstream.
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  3. Tom Sullivan

    Tom Sullivan Agent

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    Thx, I've always used the receiver to do the decoding for DTS & DD. But I have a friend that has a Yamaha 595 that's just DD. He thought he was listening to DTS but I told him that I think you need to use the six channel inputs for it to work. Which is what you now confirm. I think he'll have a problem with bass management though.
    Also his Sony DVD player is basic and doesn't have 5.1 outs, just digital.
    Another question. Do you think the sounds quality suffers when using the six channel analog outs? Vs the digital out?
    [Edited last by Tom Sullivan on August 02, 2001 at 11:29 PM]
     
  4. Christopher Chung

    Christopher Chung Stunt Coordinator

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    So, lets say the reciever reads, "Dolby Digital" when I'm playing a DVD (don't have a DTS disk to use as an example) it means that the reciever is doing the decoding right?
    I have a Sony 945 connected from the Sony DVD through the regular Monster Optical. The DVD player can decode too since it has the "DTS" and "Dolby" symbols.
    I'd also like to know whether you lose anything when you use the analog inputs as opposed to the optical inputs.
     
  5. Tom Sullivan

    Tom Sullivan Agent

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    Not sure about the Sony's, but this friend of mine thought he was listening to DD on his Yamaha. When I payed him a visit I noticed the display just had the small DD logo lit up. I told him the the whole panel should be reading "DOLBY DIGITAL". We then looked at his DVD's menu and I found that he never turn on the DIGITAL stream. You should hv seen his eye's light up when the setting was fixed. And then after the fix his receivers whole panel lit up with DOLBY DIGITAL. He was listening to Pro Logic for two years and not Dolby Digital. lol
    [Edited last by Tom Sullivan on August 03, 2001 at 12:17 AM]
     
  6. Christopher Chung

    Christopher Chung Stunt Coordinator

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    Hahaha, that's good to know Tom! Now I'm sure my reciever is running the Dolby Digital since it says it nice and large when it detects an audio stream.
    But I'm still curious about the DTS sound when I use the optical as opposed to the analog outputs/inputs. I thought you got everything gong to the reciever if you just use the optical connection and you don't have to worry anything after that. Know anything about this?
    Chris
     
  7. Tom Sullivan

    Tom Sullivan Agent

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    I wasn't sure about this either because I always used my receivers decoder. But it now looks like you'll only be able to use the DVD players DTS decoder if you can connect the six channel outs to a reciever that accepts six channel analog inputs. The question about sound quality still stands.
     
  8. Christopher Chung

    Christopher Chung Stunt Coordinator

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    Yep, my reciever has 6-channel inputs to connect from the reciever. But I thought these outputs/inputs were only for the Dolby 5.1 sound? Am I just totally confused???
    Chris
     
  9. Tom Sullivan

    Tom Sullivan Agent

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    Not sure of your DVD player but the JVC723 I have has a setting for Dolby Digital/PCM. So when I play a DTS dvd and want the DVD player to do the decoding. I just hit the 6-channel input button on my remote for the Marantz to switch to the DVD's decoder to let it do the DTS surround. I've confirmed it works by listening to the old DTS intro and could hear the stereo sound out of the rear speakers.
     
  10. ReggieW

    ReggieW Screenwriter

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    I have a JVC 721BK with the built-in DTS decoder. My receiver is the JVC 778 which was merely Dolby Digital. I have not had a problem with receiving DTS, and I notice that whenever I play a DTS disc, the 5.1 channel lights on the JVC DVD player light up, and only two are lighted on the receiver. However, when I play a Dolby Digital disc, the 5.1 lights come on on the DVD Player AND the receiver. I don't feel that any quality is lost, as the few DTS discs I have usually do sound more aggressive than their DD counterparts. I do have my analog functions fully operational for DVD-Audio though.
    Reg
     
  11. Tom Sullivan

    Tom Sullivan Agent

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    It seems you'll only get the DVD player to do the decoding if you hit the six channel inputs on your receiver. So you need a DVD player that has six channel outs. (which you do hv by the way) (great player!)
    Do the DTS intro test and listen for a stereo sound out of your rear speakers. It's just that my friend who has a DD only receiver thought he was listening to DTS through his digtal out of the DVD player. I never thought about it but now it looks like that can't be done.
     
  12. Christopher Chung

    Christopher Chung Stunt Coordinator

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    So in conclusion, you can only hear true DTS through using analog cables from the 6-channel outputs of the DVD player correct? Otherwise, using the optical cables will give you Dolby Digital, right?
    By the way, not too many DTS discs out there, so how much better is the sound?
     
  13. Nicholas A. Gallegos

    Nicholas A. Gallegos Stunt Coordinator

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  14. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    quote: So in conclusion, you can only hear true DTS through using analog cables from the 6-channel outputs of the DVD player correct? Otherwise, using the optical cables will give you Dolby Digital, right?[/quote]
    Not exactly. For players with built in decoding, you should get either, regardless of the output used. On my Sony DVP-S560, I can get DTS either way. I am not using the analog outs.
    quote: By the way, not too many DTS discs out there, so how much better is the sound?[/quote]
    Don't go there...hehehe
    Personally, I have found that most DTS tracks sound better than a DD counterpart, but the difference isn't worth losing sleep over.
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    All progress is based upon a universal, inate desire on the part of every organism, to live beyond it's income.
    ITRCA ** Honda/Acura Club ** Speedring (sorry, car guy)
    [Edited last by John Garcia on August 03, 2001 at 11:18 AM]
    [Edited last by John Garcia on August 03, 2001 at 11:25 AM]
     
  15. Scott Gaffney

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    You can have either the player or the receiver do the DD or DTS decoding. If the player does it, then you must use the 5.1 outputs. If you want the receiver to do it, then the digital output is used. If your receiver can do DTS, no real need for the 5.1 outputs. Unless, you feel your player can do a better job of decoding. Then go with the 5.1 outputs for both DD and DTS and just put the receiver in Direct mode.
    My receiver (Outlaw 1050) and player (Panny RP-91) can both do DD and DTS. So, I could just use the digital outputs and forget the 5.1 outputs. However, since the player does DVD-A, I had to hookup the 5.1 outputs. DVD-A cannot go through the digital outputs. If you play a DVD-A disc through the digital outputs you will only get the DD or DTS DVD-V quality signal. NOT the "enhanced resolution" used by the "lossless" technology.
    Now, for me, the added option I have with having a player that can decode DTS and using the 5.1 outputs is that I can have DTS AND 6.1 surround. Previously, I used DD on even the discs that had DTS because the Outlaw could matrix the center surround from a DD signal. Utilizing the 5.1 outputs and putting the Outlaw in Direct mode during DTS movies I can press the 6.1 button on the receiver and voila' I have a matrixed center surround on the DTS. Of course, it is not true DTS-ES, but, it is still pretty darn cool. This 6.1 button also works on the DVD-A tracks.
    sdg
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  16. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Yes, forgot to say that you have to use direct (analog) mode, which means using the analog inputs, to use the DTS/DD decoding from your player.
    [Edited last by John Garcia on August 03, 2001 at 11:30 AM]
     
  17. John GB

    John GB Stunt Coordinator

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  18. Tom Sullivan

    Tom Sullivan Agent

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    We're all clear now. Alot of people have receivers that are dolby digital and don't have DTS. Most likely they'll have a receiver with six channel analog inputs (or future ready) Sooo they must have a DVD player that has six channel analog outs so they can use the DVD players decoding of DTS.
    To add to the confusion, lol. My old Panasonic 120A DVD player has both DD&DTS on board decoders and no six channel analog outs, Just Digital. How are you supposed to make use of the dvd players decoders on this type of DVD player? [​IMG]
     
  19. LawrenceZ

    LawrenceZ Stunt Coordinator

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    It sounds to me that a lot of people are getting confused with the DTS and DD logos on the front of their DVD players. Just because a player displays the logo's doesn't mean that they have built in decoders for DTS and DD, just that the player will output both formats. As far as I know, a player must have 6 analogue outputs far a decoded DTS or DD signal, you would then use the 5.1 input mode of your reviever.
     
  20. Tom Sullivan

    Tom Sullivan Agent

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    Larry, good point. My friend was told by the salesman that he could use the units DTS to do the decoding. This Sony doesn't have the six channel outs. So much for saleman for knowing what he's talking about.
    No one's said if the sound takes a hit when using the analog out vs letting your receiver do the decoding in the digital domain. Any thoughts?
     

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