DTS and DD Built-In Decoders for DVD Players???

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mike_Ped, Jul 26, 2001.

  1. Mike_Ped

    Mike_Ped Second Unit

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    While I was researching a new DVD player for myself I got a little confused with something. My first DVD player was given to me as a gift, the Toshiba 1600. It has a DTS and Dolby Digital symbol on the front of it. Well, it's time for me to get a better DVD player with optical output and CDR playability so I can enjoy my new receiver. In the process of researhing for a new one, I ran into DVD players that say they have a "built-in DTS decoder" and "built-in dolby digital decoder" and some that have neither. However, BOTH those DVD players that have AND do not have this feature have the little DTS symbol and Dolby Digital symbol on the front of them. What does this mean? What is the difference between a DVD player that has a built in decoder and one that does not? Why do both that have the decoders and those that don't have the decoders have the symbols on the front? Please, I need some answers here! Thanx in advance
    Mike
     
  2. Ken Seeber

    Ken Seeber Supporting Actor

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    Some players simply pass the DD and DTS signals out through the optical or coaxial outputs while still in the digital format. They need to be decoded by an outboard decoder, such as one built into a Dolby Digital/DTS surround receiver.
    I know that at least in the case of DTS, if you look closely the logo will read "DTS Digital Out" if it doesn't actually have a built-in decoder.
    If you use the decoder built into the DVD player, you have to connect the player to your receiver with six analog output audio cables. If your new receiver has a built-in Dolby Digital and DTS decoder, don't worry about getting a player that has one. Just connect it to your receiver with a single optical or coax cable.
    [Edited last by Ken Seeber on July 26, 2001 at 01:47 AM]
     
  3. Mike_Ped

    Mike_Ped Second Unit

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    Thanx a lot. Cleared a whole bunch up just now and made my DVD selection a whole lot easier. I think I'm going to go for the Panasonic RV31 since it has MP3 playback and I already have a reciever with DTS decoding. Thanx again!
     
  4. Henry Carmona

    Henry Carmona Screenwriter

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    Hello Mike!!!!
    Mike both are compatible with "Dolby Digital" and "DTS".
    Most better A/V Receivers have "Dolby Digital" and "DTS" decoders built into them, and are of better quality than the decoders found in some DVD players.
    Some receivers will read "Digital Ready". In this case, you would have to have a DVD player with a decoder built in.
    You would also have to purchase 6 interconnects for the connection of the 5.1 audio from the DVD player to your "Digital Ready" receiver.
    With A/V receivers that already have the decoder built in, you can get either kind of DVD player (with or without decoder), and use just one connection (coaxial or optical).
    I would say that probably 95% of the HTF members here have a receiver w/decoder and have their DVD player connected via coax or optical.
    Although some also have the 6 interconnects if their DVD player doubled as a SACD player or DVD-Audio player.
    Confused yet [​IMG]
    Sorry for making it so long, i could have condensed it, but i wanted to kind of explain it a bit.
    ------------------
    [​IMG] "Charlie don't surf."
    [Edited last by Henry Carmona on July 26, 2001 at 01:52 AM]
    [Edited last by Henry Carmona on July 26, 2001 at 01:55 AM]
     

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