Dryer Exhaust Question

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by SethH, Jul 29, 2004.

  1. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    I recently purchased a used washer/dryer set for the place I'm renting with a few other guys. The house already had the correct outlets and hoses and also had a plastic exhaust hose to hook to the dryer. The problem is that the hose it torn. Can I use duct tape on this or does it get too hot for duct tape? What are my other options for repair?
     
  2. TerryS

    TerryS Agent

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    You can buy replacement hoses fairly cheap at your local home center. Otherwise duct tape should be fine. The hose never gets too hot to touch unless it is clogged.
     
  3. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    Duct tape will work.
     
  4. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    Great! Thanks guys.
     
  5. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    A metal hose is $5 at home depot, duct tape will work until it dries out and gets brittle.
     
  6. Kwang Suh

    Kwang Suh Supporting Actor

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    Duct tape is not advisable. Having a plastic hose is also a safety hazard. Your best bet is to get a flexible metal hose, and use aluminum tape to connect the hose to the wall and dryer.
     
  7. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    I had duct tape on my 12 year old dryer vent flex duct. It held just fine. Only until I bought a new W&D a couple months ago did I have to redo the entire setup. This time though, all solid ducting, no flex. A bit more of a pain to install but much, much better air flow. I still used duct tape for all the fittings.
     
  8. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    Having worked on ducting, I've seen what duct tape can do after a few years, I wouldnt trust it [​IMG]
    I guess if it springs a leak it's not a big deal.
     
  9. Luis Esp

    Luis Esp Supporting Actor

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    The glue on duct tape melts down after a while. Kwang's advice is solid!
     
  10. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    n/m
     
  11. StephenHa

    StephenHa Second Unit

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    Having done appliance sales never use the bathroom duct (that plastic stuff is bathroom fan duct) unless you dislike your house, the metal stuff is cheap and won't burn as fast, our insurance company would cancel our insurance if we used plastic (also check your cords and washer hoses every so often)
     

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