down or front firing subs? what's better? what's the difference?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Derek Kan, Aug 8, 2001.

  1. Derek Kan

    Derek Kan Agent

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    This might be too general of a question, but what kind of subs are better? Down or front firing? I've always had the impression that down firing is better... but then I really don't know WHY, if it is, that is. Can anyone explain the difference to me?
    Also, how is the energy exls-10? It's a front firing sub, and that's the one I'm looking at to buy right now.
     
  2. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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    This has been covered in the past, and as far as I remember, the opinion of the experts is that it doesn't matter, a well designed sub is a well designed sub, period. It's possible to do good and bad designs with both orientations, so "front or down" really shouldn't be a criterion in making a buying decision.
     
  3. NickSP

    NickSP Supporting Actor

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    I like the Energy sub you mentioned. I have matched it with Klipsch RF3s for the front, RS3 and RC3 round up the rest.
    I love the Bass as it is from my current setup and feel it is not an overkill.
     
  4. Larry Chanin

    Larry Chanin Stunt Coordinator

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    There are of course special situations where a front-firing subwoofer would have advantages over a downward firing subwoofer.
    For example, when it is necessary to place a subwoofer in a cabinet a front-firing subwoofer is better. Sunfire builds their Architectural subwoofer series specifically for this application.
    Larry
     
  5. Ron Stimpson

    Ron Stimpson Stunt Coordinator

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    Difference?
    One fires down, one fires sideways.
    That's about it.
    Heck there are subs that fire UPWARDS too. Fact is, unless there is someother design limitation (all subs have limits, some more than others) there is little advantage to either configuration. Each has excellent and poor examples out there.
    Find the price and feature set (and credible reviews) that support your desires. The cabinet issue might be one but even that is a bit iffy (that is, a like sized downward firing sub would probably work about as well in the same cabinet).
    Bottom line? Don't use this issue as a criterion for selection.
    Ron
     
  6. Brian Perry

    Brian Perry Cinematographer

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    While I love my front-firing Velodyne FSR-15, I adored my friend's downward-firing Velodyne ULD-15. He had it on a concrete slab (which I tried, but it made no improvement on my sub). If you go with a downward-firing sub, I would definitely look into trying it on a slab.
     
  7. Jeremy Hegna

    Jeremy Hegna Supporting Actor

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    I agree with the above opinions...but I have another...
    The BEST subs in the world are tall, cylindrical, and they fire downwards... [​IMG]
    SVS. That's all you need, try the rest, than buy the best.
    Jeremy
     
  8. Larry Chanin

    Larry Chanin Stunt Coordinator

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    Ron:
    I agree with you that downward versus front firing should never be the primary criteria when selecting a subwoofer, but surely there are specialized situations where one design might offer some advantages (assuming we are considering comparable, high quality products).
    Getting back to the built-in cabinet example, depending on whether or not its advisable to transfer energy to a cabinet enclosure, don't you think that an installer should consider the type of subwoofer design before making a final subwoofer selection?
    From your experience do you feel that the construction of the listening room floor (i.e., concrete slab versus plywood over wood joists) should be considered before making the final selection?
    Lastly, the fact that SVS chose to exclusively manufacturer downward firing subwoofers, did that have more to do with manufacturing issues related to cylindrical enclosures, rather than any inherent superiority of the downward design?
    Thanks.
    Larry
     

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